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DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

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A "Smashing" DWM 3Q19 Market Commentary

Brit with flag

“Fancy a cuppa’?” “Anyone for tea?” Even though our beloved Chicago Bears were “bloody” unsuccessful in their visit to London this past weekend, I’m “chuffed to bits” to put a little “cheeky” British spin on this quarter’s market commentary… Let’s “smash it”!

After a volatile three months, the third quarter of 2019 is officially in the history books. The S&P500 finished only 1.6% below its all-time high, bonds rallied as yields lowered, and alternatives such as commodities and real estate rallied. It’s been a rather “blimey” year for investor returns so far, but there’s a lot of uncertainty out there about if these “mint” times can last. Let’s look at how the asset classes fared first before turning to what’s next.

Equities: Equities were about unchanged for the quarter, as evidenced by the MSCI AC World Index -0.2% reading for the quarter.  Domestic large cap stocks represented by the S&P500 did the best relatively, up 1.7%, but underperformed in the final weeks of the quarter. Recent trends show that traders are gravitating toward stocks with cheaper valuations instead of pricey, growth ones. International equities* underperformed for the quarter, down -1.8% but had a strong showing in September. Even with this so-so quarter, stocks, in general, are up over 15%** Year-to-Date (“YTD”)! Yes, “mate”, this bull market – the longest on record – continues, but at times looking “quite knackered”.

Fixed Income: The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index & the Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index ascended even higher, up 0.7% and 2.3%, respectively for the quarter and now up 6.3 & 8.5%, respectively YTD. “Brilliant!” Yields continue to fall which pushes bond prices up. But how far can they fall? The 10-year US Treasury finished the quarter at 1.68%, a full percentage point below where it started the year. For yield seekers, at least it’s still positive here in the States as the amount of negatively yielding debt around the world swells. Sixteen global central banks lowered rates during the quarter including the US Fed, all of them hoping to prop up their economies. As long as they’re successful, all is good. But what if our slowing US economy actually stalls? We could be “bloody snookered”…

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, showed a +0.3% gain and now up 6.1% YTD. Lots of winners in this space. “Lovely!” For example, there is a lot of money flowing into gold***, +4.4% on 3q19 & +14.7% YTD, as it is seen as a safe haven. And real estate, +6.3% 3Q19 and +23.5% YTD, has rallied from investors looking for yields that are more than the bonds like those mentioned above.

Frankly, it’s been a pretty great year for the balanced investor who’s now looking at YTD returns that around double-digits. But it’s not all “hunky-dory”. The main worries are the following:

  • The US-China trade war continues affecting the global economy. Sure, since the US exports less than every other major country, this shouldn’t affect us as much. But given the uncertainty, many companies are choosing to hold off on capital expenditure until we get clarity on this issue. Reports earlier this week that US manufacturing momentum has seriously slowed down led to one of the worst fourth quarter starts for the stock market in years. Politics will continue to make it volatile.
  • The Fed’s path of monetary easing. It’s gotten “mad” – it seems every time there is bad news, it’s good news for the stock market because traders are betting on the central banks around the world to support the markets. Seems “dodgy”, right?!? So the Fed must play this balancing act, always wanting to keep the economy humming along. Quite frankly, there really is no economic reason for a rate cut right now if it weren’t for the trade conflict. Figure we’ll have at least one more cut, possibly two, in 4Q19 and hopefully that’s it. Otherwise, if they keep lowering, it means we have fallen into a recession.  

It’s in a lot of peoples’ interest to get a trade deal done. If it does, markets will celebrate it. The longer a deal plays out, the more volatility we’ll see and the higher the risk of recession becomes. The US economy is not “going down the loo”, but it won’t continue to go bonkers with everything mentioned above as well as the Tax Reform stimulus fading away in the rear-view mirror as quickly as a Guinness at the Ye Olde Cheshire.

This all isn’t “rubbish”. Actually, there is a lot of turmoil out there. So don’t be a “sorry bloke”. In challenging times like this, you want to make sure you’re working with an experienced wealth manager like DWM to guide you through.

Don’t hesitate to contact us with any “lovely” questions or “brilliant” comments, and Go Bears!

“Cheerio!”

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

*represented by the MSCI AC World Index Ex-USA

** represented by the MSCI AC World Index

***represented by the iShares Gold Trust

****represented by the iShares Global REIT ETF

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Climate Capitalists to the Rescue?

Written by Les Detterbeck.

Record heat has hit the South. On October 1, it was 101 in Montgomery, AL. Record highs were hit in AL, TN, MS and KY. An acute lack of rainfall has dried out the Southeast as well and residents and farmers are hurting. Planet Earth continues to get warmer.

Look at the chart above showing the changes in temperatures from the 1850s until now. Each stripe is one year. Dark blue years are cooler and red stripes are warmer. The period 1971-2000 is the base line. At the same time, extreme events like Dorian are becoming more severe, more glaciers have died and seas and lakes are getting higher. The climate has changed.

The past century has seen major changes in the world. The Industrial Revolution has brought riches to some, higher standards of living to many, and the population has increased from 2 billion to 7 billion in that last century, and carbon dioxide (“CO2”) emissions have skyrocketed. Fossil fuels have been used to produce industrial power, electricity, transportation, heating, fertilizers and plastic. In 1900 about 2 billion tons of CO2 went airborne. For 2019, 40 billion tons per year will be emitted, with the biggest increase in the last 30 years.   Expanding use of fossil fuel and related increasing emissions of CO2 have gone hand in hand with the expansion of world growth. See the chart below.

GDP CO2

We humans also produce CO2, breathing and eating.  Trees and plants absorb CO2 and, with sunlight and water, convert it to food.   Compared to 1900, we have 5 billion more humans, expanded use of fossil fuels and, because of deforestation, we have less flora to absorb the CO2.

The first half of the 20th century scientists believed that almost all of the CO2 given off by industry and humans and not absorbed by plants would be sucked up by the oceans.  By 1965 oceanographers realized that the seas couldn’t keep with the CO2 emissions.   Climate change shouldn’t come as a surprise; we’ve known about it for decades.

There are lots of predictions about the impact of climate change in the future. No one can predict the future. But certainly, as our beloved Yogi Berra always said, “The Future is not what it used to be.”

The Economist recaps it this way: “Climate change is not the end of the world.”  Humankind is not poised teetering on the edge of extinction.  The planet is not in peril.”  However, climate change could be a dire threat to the displacement of tens of millions of people, it will likely dry up wells and water mains, increase flooding as well as producing higher temps and more severe weather.  The Economist concludes that “the longer humanity takes to curb emissions, the greater the dangers and sparser the benefits-and the larger the risk of some truly catastrophic surprises.”

Addressing climate change will also provide substantial business opportunities in the coming years.  Already some countries are abandoning coal to generate electricity. Britain, e.g., has developed a thriving offshore wind farm industry used to generate power. Germany recently announced that it will spend $75 billion to meet its 2030 goals to combat climate change, primarily in the transportation area with electric vehicles.

In addition, “climate capitalists” want to do good for the planet and well for themselves.  Elon Musk has invested billions into batteries and electric vehicles.   Chinese BYD’s Zhenzhen sprawling campus is a major provider of solar cells, electric cars, heavy machinery and other items needing energy storage.  Warren Buffet has invested $232 million into BYD.  American billionaire Philip Anschutz has spent a decade promoting a $3 billion high-voltage electric grid. Bill Joy, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems, is now backing Beyond Meat, a maker of plant-based alternatives to burgers.  Microsoft’s Bill Gates established a $1 billion company to bankroll technologies that “radically cut annual emissions.”  Even Pope Francis is using the Vatican Bank’s $3 billion fund to help fight climate change.

The UN’s one day climate summit last week concluded with a number of new announcements.  65 countries and the EU have committed to reach net-zero carbon by 2050.   Unfortunately 75% of the emissions come from 12 countries and 4 of them, India, American, China and Russia made no commitment.  However, certain businesses such as Nestle, Salesforce and have made commitments to reach net-zero by 2050 or before.

2050 will be here before we know it.  Yet, technological change can be adopted quickly, particularly when people are provided a better alternative.  In America, the shift from horse-drawn carts to engine-driven vehicles took place within a decade, from 1903 to 1913.  Let’s hope climate capitalists all over the world do well for themselves and good for planet as soon as possible and we humans and our countries do our parts as well.

 

https://www.dwmgmt.com

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Indiana Jones and the Fountain of Wealth

Written by Jake Rickord.

With current markets swirling with questions of trade deals, recessions, inverted yield curves, and various other political and financial uncertainties, should we be fearing a near future “Temple of Doom” scenario like intrepid archaeologist Indiana Jones in the much acclaimed 1984 movie?!? Perhaps we can learn some tidbits of info - clues, per se - from Indy that can help us in our quest for our prized possession: financial serenity, wealth management’s version of the Holy Grail. While this ultimate goal may look a little different for each of us, and the journey this may be wildly different, some of the steps we take will likely be extremely similar, and the clues below, inspired by Indy, can provide some guidance as we take those steps!

Clue #1: Diversifying your arsenal, and your portfolio!

You’ve heard it before. In fact, diversification is a word that has been mentioned so many times in TV and movies that it’s become hard to think about investing without discussing how diversified one’s portfolio is. We’re here to tell you that this relationship makes sense! Various studies have shown over the years that having a well-diversified portfolio can significantly benefit investors in the long run.

Figure 1: Hypothetical Growth of $100,000 showing Diversified versus Undiversified Portfolio*

As shown in Figure 1, having a globally allocated, well-diversified portfolio made up of investments that have low correlation to one another, with pieces of each being from the equity, fixed income, and “nontraditional investments” (or alternatives), can help investors try to protect their assets during market downturns, and participate in market upswings. Much like Indy’s arsenal of guns, knives, and his famous whip protected him, using multiple asset class holdings with low correlations can protect investors’ portfolios from extreme danger.

Clue #2: Be Educated!

As a professor of archaeology at Marshall College, Indy’s extensive years of research have provided him a wealth of knowledge to work off of when he begins each search for ancient (and sometimes alien) artifacts. Despite this, he learns quite a bit along the way on his quests that leads to his success in discovering these items. Much like Indy, our pathways to financial health and peace often seem clouded in mystery, and are often filled with confusing directions and puzzles that can lead us astray from the path to our goals. These puzzles and directions, luckily, can be illuminated in most cases by educating one’s self in the complex and intricate business of finance! Whether it’s subjects of Arks, mysterious stones, or crystal skulls, a.k.a. topics of investments, insurance and taxes in finance terms, a little bit of knowledge can go a long way towards creating the ever important map to the desired goal! Blogs like these help our clients become educated and better prepared for the financial journey ahead!

Clue #3: A Little Help From Our Friends

No matter which adventure he’s on, Indy always has a crew of fellow explorers with him to help on his search. Each play their own integral role in supporting his journey as he brushes with Nazis, Russians, and Thuggee cults. In a similar manner, wealth managers like DWM can act as your “Short Round” (an ally) in your continual journey to financial serenity and success, helping guide you through the sometimes dark and perplexing pathways. Our expertise in these “ruins” of sorts can assist with dodging the pitfalls in your financial plans and portfolios.

With or without headlines coming out about recessions or inversions or trade deals or anything else, by following these three clues, and sticking to them for the long-term, an investor can create a stable pathway to success. Just as Indy never gives up on his quests, neither should we.  Our steps may alter in ways over our lives, from accumulating wealth, to protecting it, and then to financially planning for our legacies, but each of these has the underlying pursuit for peace of mind. Please feel free to reach out to DWM if you have any questions about how we can accompany you on your hunt.

*Source: https://www.schwab.com/resource-center/insights/content/why-global-diversification-matters

 

https://www.dwmgmt.com

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