Our Blog

DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

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Your “Hidden Brain” Impacts Your Politics

Written by Lester Detterbeck.

 

 

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Hopefully, all of us will vote in the midterms on 11/6 or before. Roughly half the country will vote for Republicans (conservatives) and half will vote for Democrats (liberals.). Did you know that your choices are not only impacted by your upbringing and experiences, but also very specifically by your genes? We’re hard-wired from birth for much of our political views.

Shankar Vedantam is one of my favorite authors and commentators. He is NPR’s social science correspondent and before that a journalist at The Washington Post. His 2010 book “The Hidden Brain: How our Unconscious Minds Elect Presidents, Control Markets, Wage Wars and Save our Lives” describes how our unconscious biases influence us. I highly recommend it.

Mr. Vedantam relates the story that on a regular basis, right before an election, someone will share an article with him about how science proves that the brains of a liberal are stunted or that Republicans are less intelligent than Democrats. While those claims likely have no merit, Mr. Vedantam contends that there are “genuine psychological differences between liberals and conservatives.”

On a recent Hidden Brain telecast, Mr. Vedantam hosted political scientist Dr. John Hibbing to the show. Dr. Hibbing is co-author of “Predisposed: Liberals, Conservatives and The Biology of Political Differences.” Dr. Hibbing pointed out that differences between partisans are not limited to politics. There are generally differences in food choices, living spaces, and temperaments. Conservatives generally like meat and potatoes; liberals are more likely to prefer ethnic food. Conservatives tend to have organized rooms with things like sports memorabilia, while liberals tend to have lots more books and may not be as tidy. As far as temperament, conservatives tend to favor order and tradition and liberals tend to be more comfortable with ambiguity and change.

Then, there’s a huge difference between conservatives and liberals when it comes to threats and danger. According to Dr. Hibbing, conservatives tend to see the world with its terrorists, home invaders, drug cartels, and immigrants as a very dangerous and threatening place.   Liberals tend to believe they live in a relatively safe society.   Conservatives therefore want and need the government to help them “protect themselves and their family, limit immigration, and put lots of money into defense and law and order.” Liberals, on the other hand, are reinvigorated by immigrants coming to our country, don’t see the need to spend so much money on defense and support gun control. Conservatives and liberals read about events of the world and they simply don’t respond to them in the same way.

Mr. Vedantam chimed in: “There is a very powerful illusion that we have that the rest of the world sees the world the way we see the world. And, if they come to a different conclusion, it must be because they’re being deliberately obtuse or somehow deliberately biased, as opposed to the idea that people are actually seeing the world the same way, but reacting to it differently.” Psychologists call it a case of “false consensus” that we assume others will see the world the way we do.

People are wired differently. Roughly 30-40% of our political views come from genetics based on research by Dr. Hibbing. 60-70% comes from our environment. Mr. Vedantam has described how researchers separate the effects of biology from those of the environment. They look at fraternal and identical twins. Both sets of twins have identical initial environments, but the fraternal twins have similar but not identical genes. Data from thousands and thousands of twin pairs supports the conclusion that political views are quite “inheritable.”

Finally, brain activation patterns of liberals and conservatives are different. Dr. Hibbing has conducted tens of thousands of experiments in which he showed various pictures to individuals whose brain was being scanned. Liberals’ brains would highly activate at times much differently than when conservatives’ brains were highly active. The brain scan results alone proved “incredibly accurate in determining whether an individual was a conservative or liberal.”

Frankly, I find it very helpful to learn that political views are at least, in part, biological. Years ago, left-handers (like both my mother and father) were thought to be lazy and had their hands hit with a wooden ruler to make them write “correctly,” using their right hand. People saw left-handers as a flaw, something that needed to be driven out. Now, of course, we understand that being left-handed is very biological. Similarly with politics. Dr. Hibbing concludes: “If we recognize that others, virtually half the country, are oriented to the world in a different fashion, maybe we would be a bit more tolerant to them. This is the only way we’re going to get anywhere if we at least understand where they are coming from even if we might deeply disagree with their conclusions.”

As we approach the midterms with the vitriol rising, let’s all remember our hidden brains and those of others, particularly family and friends and show tolerance and respect to all. We may see the same world differently: our unique genes, unconscious biases and life experiences may produce different conclusions and different political preferences. Yet, we’re all Americans and we and our country will all do better if we work together.     

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Midterm Elections and Beyond: What to Expect

Written by Lester Detterbeck.

 

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November 6 is less than 3 weeks away. We hope everyone votes - as Americans, it’s our most fundamental right. We certainly are not predicting the election results. Lots of close races in IL, SC and across the nation.

However, history shows that the president’s party has lost House seats in over 90% of the last 20 midterm elections. With possible changes in Congress, anxiety sets in among investors. Political uncertainty begets legislative uncertainty and creates a headwind for stocks.

No surprise-the stock markets in 2018 have been quite volatile, particularly these last three weeks when equities have pulled back 5-10%. Even so, the fundamentals are still very good. Economic growth and corporate profits remain strong. The job market is robust, overall personal incomes are increasing and consumer sentiment is high. All bode well for a longer-term positive trend.

Historically, U.S. stock market performance after mid-term elections has been very good. The uncertainty fades and investors move forward. Going back to 1926, the average return on U.S. stocks the year after the mid-term election has been an amazing 17.9%. And, the average return in November, the month of the election, has been 2.7%. However, the last three midterms have not produced such lofty U.S. stock market returns in the following year: only 5% in 2007, 2% in 2011 and 1.4% in 2015.

We expect lots of forecasts as we come up to Election Day. For many years, the “Presidential Election Cycle Theory” was thought to be reliable. This theory states that U.S. stock market returns are weak the first two years of the president’s term and strong in the year prior to (the year after the mid-term election) and the year of the next election. Yet, recently this theory has missed the mark many times including for elections in 1960, 1984, 1988 and 1992. Furthermore if this theory was correct, then 2007 and 2008 should have been strong and 2009 weak. However, the opposite was true. In addition, during President Obama’s tenure, the stock markets were stronger the first two years and weaker the last two years of each term. Again, just the opposite of the “Theory.”

We’d rather focus on the long-term and fundamentals rather than rely on a theory that hasn’t worked for decades. We’re viewing October-to-date performance as a healthy pullback, particularly for U.S. stocks. The S&P 500 price/earnings ratio forward estimate as of Monday was down to 16.84 as compared to 19.30 a year ago. This current P/E ratio is now right at the 25 year average which typically means the bull market is not about to end.

At the same time, the price/earnings ratios for other developed countries (like those in the EU and Japan) are less than the U.S. And, the P/E ratio for emerging market countries (think China, India, Russia and Turkey) is even less. A lower P/E ratio means a lower stock price for the same earnings. Academic research has shown that undervalued equity markets have achieved higher future returns in the long run than their overvalued counterparts. That’s why we are so confident, and research shows, that, in the long run, diversification wins.

We’re not making predictions about the financial markets between now and November 6th nor what happens thereafter. Instead, we encourage you to “sit tight” in your diversified, appropriate long-term asset allocation through and after November 6th. Over the past century, equities have produced real capital growth of about 7% annually. No other investment-bonds, cash, gold or real estate offers comparable return potential. At the same time, we encourage you to consider holding an appropriate amount of fixed income and liquid alternatives, which both are generally non-correlated with equity and are designed to reduce your risk and volatility and increase your long-term returns.

So, stay invested and make sure to vote. If you won’t be able to vote in person on November 6th, please obtain, complete and submit your absentee ballot. Remember: Every vote matters. Every vote counts.

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The Life Insurance Puzzle

Written by Ginny Wilson.

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We read an article last month in Investment News that suggests that life insurance should not be used as a savings vehicle. As you might imagine, there was some uproar among the life insurance industry readers that heartily disagreed with the premise of the “Guestblog” by Blair Duquesnay.   Ms. Duquesnay believes that there are certainly appropriate purposes for life insurance, but saving for retirement is not one of them. She stated in a follow-up that “life insurance is an instrument of protection, not accumulation.” We wanted to look a little closer into this to understand both sides of the argument.

First, let’s start with some of the universally acceptable reasons for having a life insurance policy. As Ms. Duquesnay says, life insurance should be purchased, in general, “because there will be a financial impact” on a business or family if someone dies. Certainly, protecting our loved ones or business partners is prudent and responsible. If something happens to you, you might want to provide a benefit for regular or special spending needs, potential increased child care costs, a mortgage payoff or other debt relief. Similarly, a death benefit might help cover college costs or provide a lifetime of comfortable support to our dependents. Some policies can be used for estate planning, long-term care or asset protection. It is also true that, in general, the need for a life insurance death benefit may decline over time, as your life circumstances change.

Let’s talk about the different types of life insurance:

1.Term Life, or annually renewable life insurance, offers an affordable premium to buy a particular level of insurance for a specific period of time. Maybe you use it, maybe you won’t and maybe you keep it going, maybe you don’t, but, either way, at the end of the term, the policy expires and, generally, there is no longer a need to have it. There is no additional value to the policy beyond the safety net of the death benefit.

2.Whole Life is the most common form of permanent life insurance, which means the benefit coverages will be around for your lifetime, as long as you pay the premiums. There are two parts to it – an investment portion (cash value) and an insurance portion (face value or death benefit). Premiums are fixed and are considerably higher than term policies, with high mortality charges for keeping the guaranteed death benefit. These products are designed to stay in force for your lifetime and come with steep surrender charges if you terminate the policy early. There are also substantial up-front commissions and fees for investing part of your premiums in a tax-deferred account. You can access your cash value by taking a loan out with the insurance company against the account value in the policy and they will charge you interest. If you stop paying the premiums, you may be able to switch to a paid-up policy that will be worth the existing cash value, but in general, these products are expensive to keep in place.

3. Universal Life is designed to also be a permanent insurance policy, but is considered adjustable because the policy offers the flexibility of changing premium amounts and having a fixed or increasing death benefit. If you need to stop paying or reduce premiums, your accumulated cash value can be used to keep the policy from lapsing. Once the policy value goes to zero, the policy and death benefit lapse forever. There can be steep surrender charges if terminating or withdrawing from your account, which will reduce any accumulated cash value. Like Whole life policies, your premium pays a portion to a high-interest cash value account and a portion for a death benefit. The growth is dependent on the performance in the accounts, on investment earnings (or losses) and on the amount of your premium contributions. The flexibility can be beneficial, but the policy value can deteriorate and lapse and the fees and costs are much higher than a term policy.

4. Variable Life – these are policies built like Universal life contracts (there are also hybrid Variable Universal Life policies, just to make it more confusing), but the investments are kept in managed mutual fund sub accounts with investments selected from a menu. This gives the policy holder more investment choice (and risk) for the cash value account in the policy. However, like Universal life, the same risk applies - the accumulation is dependent on the amount paid with your premium and the performance of the investments in the cash value account. The flexibility might be attractive, but it also increases the risk to the policy. Again, once the policy value goes to zero, the policy and death benefit lapse forever.

There are more insurance products and deeper complexities to the above definitions, but this is a basic outline of some of the life insurance choices. As you can see, the “permanent” life insurance policies and their saving (or investment) option can be costly and will allow for less flexibility in the growth of your investment savings than using standard investment accounts not tied to insurance. We generally find that the expensive fees, commissions and surrender charges keep us from recommending these products as a saving vehicle. “Buy term and invest the rest” is the motto of most fee-only advisors. The insurance industry is always working to improve these products and find the sweet spot for combining protection with accumulation. We certainly agree that there may be appropriate circumstances for using the more complex insurance products. At DWM, we don’t sell any of these insurance products, but we are happy to review your current policies or insurance needs to help you find the sweet spot for you and your family!

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