Our Blog

DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

Here’s our latest blog:

 

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Emptying the Nest

Written by Ginny Wilson.

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It is an exciting time of year when smiling faces in caps and gowns are seen everywhere! Recently having the pleasure to witness my son’s graduation, the President of the University of South Carolina made sure that the graduates took the time to thank their parents for helping them get to this important occasion. Absolutely! So, congratulations, parents! Turning 21 or graduating from college are exciting milestones and your kids have now reached what we all consider to be the beginning of “adulthood” as they get ready to enter the “real” world. Kids grow up in all different ways and in all different stages – is your young adult ready for launch?

At DWM, we like to offer proactive financial advice for all members of our clients’ families. As your young adult is readying to depart the nest, however that looks, we think this is a good opportunity to provide some education, as they take the reins of their own financial future. Many college-aged kids have had a student checking account and understand how to use their debit card pretty well by now! They probably have some experience with having a job and budgeting for things they want to buy in the short term. However, some of the more complex financial topics can be intimidating for young adults, While they may have a solid background in finance, it is always good to review concepts like compound interest, building good credit, taxes, buying insurance and understanding 401(k)s, for once they land that first “real” job! We might suggest that a good place to start is by getting a copy of The Wall Street Journal. Guide to Starting Your Financial Life by Karen Blumenthal (https://www.amazon.com/Street-Journal-Guide-Starting-Financial/dp/030740708X ). This book covers issues about renting or buying your first home, basic investing, taxes, purchasing health insurance, buying a car, establishing good credit and saving for retirement, among other topics. Might make a perfect college graduation or 21st birthday gift!

In addition, this is a good time to help them make sure all of their accounts are properly set up, titled appropriately and that they have a savings program in place. Reaching the age of majority, which is age 21 for both Illinois and South Carolina, is a good time to change any custodial accounts like a UTMA and UGMA to individual accounts. It may also be helpful to talk about debt, perhaps review student loans and consider opening a credit card account to establish some credit history. Using debt wisely, having a good emergency fund and responsible budgeting are all really valuable conversations and will help your young adult navigate their new financial map.

Encouraging saving and investing is a fundamental lesson and the “pay yourself first” concept is an important one. Remind them that they are paying their future self and that, just like the rewards for eating right, exercising and wearing sunscreen, saving and investing will benefit the health of their future self (as well as their current self!).

One idea that might help is having an automatic savings app like the one found in The College Investor article https://thecollegeinvestor.com/17610/top-automatic-savings-apps/. Also from The College Investor, you can find numerous financial and investing podcasts available that your young adult may take interest in. Here’s the link to get started: https://thecollegeinvestor.com/6778/top-investing-podcasts/. Or maybe they would want a subscription that focuses on the economy, like The Economist or Wall Street Journal.

If working and the business offers it, they should always make sure to contribute to their 401(k) to get the most advantage of any company match. And, if they don’t already have one, starting a Roth account is another great investment savings vehicle, especially while their starting incomes and lower tax brackets will allow them the opportunity to make annual contributions. Up to $5,500 of their earned income can be directly contributed to a Roth account and the compounded gains will never be taxed. Your young adult can set up automatic transfers to investment accounts or savings vehicles so they get used to not seeing those funds in their everyday account, just like 401(k) contributions. It is a great way to plant the seeds for a successful future!

Once the young adult has gotten some traction and they have good financial habits in motion, encourage them to contact us and check out the Emerging Investors program at DWM http://www.dwmgmt.com/investors/. You can learn even more about the EI program by clicking on this link and accessing one of our recent blogs written by Jake Rickord http://dwmgmt.com/archives-blog/index.php/2017/11/. Our Emerging Investors program offers a specialized financial planning model with DWM investment strategies that uses the automated Schwab IIP platform. Our goal is to help them graduate to full DWM Total Wealth Management clients down the road. The best way to reach the level of a TWM client is not just by higher earning, but by stronger and earlier investing. We love to educate and help others plan for their financial future. We are always available if you or your young adult have any questions and would certainly welcome feedback.   Please let us know how we can be of assistance!

 

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Don’t Waste One Drop of Summer!

Written by Les Detterbeck.

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Summer is here. Perhaps you’ll take a vacation. Great! But, beyond that, what’s on the rest of your summer bucket list? Don’t waste one drop of this very special season. Here are some possibilities:

Relax

  • Nap in a hammock
  • Sit on a porch swing
  • Watch the sun rise and/or set from a beach
  • Bring a blanket and lie on the grass at an outdoor concert

Devour special summer foods

  • Make homemade ice cream
  • Pick berries and peaches at a farm
  • Make lemonade from scratch
  • Dig your own clams
  • Buy a creamsicle from the neighborhood ice cream truck

Do something nostalgic

  • Ride a roller coaster
  • Play miniature golf
  • Go to a “final tour” concert
  • Go to the state fair

Experience the great outdoors

  • Go fishing
  • Go kayaking or paddle boarding
  • Go camping (or glamping, if the outdoors doesn’t suit you)
  • Go on a nature walk
  • Take a group to a water park

Do something out of the ordinary

  • Take a last minute, improv road trip
  • Go to a baseball game
  • Clean the clutter in your house and take it to Goodwill
  • Make a playlist of all of your favorite songs. Take a drive and sing them at the top of your lungs.
  • Plant a garden

Give back to your community

  • Volunteer at a local animal shelter or even adopt a new pet
  • Perform random acts of kindness
  • Write a soldier a letter
  • Bake cookies for a neighbor

All of the above would be fun.   In addition, how about adding personal growth items to your summer bucket list? These activities can enhance the quality of your life and contribute to the realization of your dreams and aspirations. Hence, these should add to your long-term happiness. Not only that, life-long learning can be fun. Consider the following:

Reading/Listening

  • Fiction and non-fiction, best sellers and classics
  • Read a book you normally wouldn’t read
  • Download an audio book or two and listen to it while driving, exercising or walking
  • Download podcasts and listen to those

Health

  • Try to do 30 minutes of exercise every day
  • Use a workout “buddy” for the summer
  • Modify your workout routine by cross-training in the summer
  • Eat fresh fruits and vegetables whenever possible

Career

  • Work towards further expertise and/or an advanced degree in your profession
  • Work on personal skills such as writing, communication and time management
  • Help complete summer projects for the development of your company

Family

  • Discover your ethnic roots-do a DNA test and have your relatives do one too
  • Chart your family tree (and get everyone involved)
  • Interview and record an older family member and preserve their family stories
  • Attend or host a family reunion

Take some quiet time to define your happiness

  • When are you most happy?
  • How often are you engaged in your passions?
  • What accomplishments are you most proud of?
  • What will be your legacy?

We hope you all have a wonderful summer, perhaps take a vacation, have fun and attain some personal growth. The combination is priceless. The summer solstice on June 21 is one week away. Labor Day will be here before we know it.   Happy Summer! Don’t waste one drop of it!

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Rates keep going up! Should I Still Buy That McMansion I’ve Been Dreaming of??

Written by Grant Maddox.

 

BMIFeature-Rising-Rates-Minimal.pngThe ultra-inexpensive era of mortgage rates is coming to an end, and quickly. Mortgage rates have reached unprecedented 7-year highs. The average 30-year mortgage this week will cost consumers 4.7%, up nearly a full 1% from 2016.

While a 1% increase may not seem like the end of the world, it is important to realize the effect this may have over the course of a mortgage. Consider a consumer who purchased a home with a $200,000 mortgage in 2016. Assuming a 3.7% interest rate, this would amount to a principal and interest monthly payment of $921. In today’s environment, the same consumer may have a monthly payment of $1,037. Over the life of a conventional 30-year mortgage, today’s consumers may pay $41,760 more than those who locked in a rate in 2016.

Reviewing rates in today’s environment may leave some consumers discouraged. However, in comparison to many historical rates, today’s rates are actually relatively low. Take 1981, for example, when the average 30-year mortgage rate was 16.64%. Using a 16.64% interest rate, a $200,000 mortgage in 1981 would cost the consumer $2,793 per month, or, over the course of 30 years, $632,160 more than a consumer today.

For those looking to purchase a new home, the question remains: Is now a good time to buy? The answer is not so simple. There are a few factors to consider before determining if it’s the right time to buy for you.

First of all, as the economy improves overall, mortgage rates are likely to continue to increase. The culprit behind increased mortgage rates is actually surging wage growth. According to the Census and Bureau of Labor Statistics, average household income is at an all-time high, while mortgage rates have been laying low—until now. As wage growth continues to increase the money supply to consumers, consumer spending power increases. Unfortunately, increased consumer spending also increases demand for goods and will ultimately raise the price of goods–inflation.

With the expectation of rising inflation comes a steady increase in the yield of the 10-year Treasury note. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which usually affects the 30-year mortgage rate, has risen to its highest close since 2011, ending up at just over 3.1%.

In addition, the Federal Reserve has indicated that it will be raising short-term rates at least three to four times this year alone, and potentially several more times in the coming years.

Current home owners should also not expect to refinance anytime soon. As rates rise, the group of homeowners who would benefit from or be eligible for mortgage refinancing has decreased drastically by 46% this year, according to Black Knight Inc.—the smallest group since 2008.

But with mortgage rates trending upward and no sign of lowering again in sight, many people are choosing to strike while they still have the chance.

Overall, your decision depends on if you want to wait it out and hope that mortgages rates will decrease again, or if you want to buy now while the rates are still relatively low, even with the 1% jump. One effective tip to help counteract for the increase in mortgage rates is to lower your price range accordingly and look for a house priced lower than what you would have pursued had mortgage rates remained at their lowest point.

Of course, there are many other factors besides mortgage rates which may affect a consumer’s decision to purchase a home. For example, economic factors such as rising rents, home appreciation, and predictable monthly housing payments.

Bottom line: Rising rates are expected to continue for some time, so it is important to weigh all factors at play and make the decision that’s right for you today and in the future.

 

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