Our Blog

DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

Here’s our latest blog:

 

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The End of Signing on the Dotted Line

Written by Grant Maddox.

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We all lead busy lives, so it’s important to save time and maximize efficiency whenever we can. The new eSignature feature from Charles Schwab allows you to review, electronically sign, and send back eligible forms to us, making a variety of processes quicker and easier than ever before.

At DWM, we always stay up to date with the latest technology and keep you informed, so we can ensure the best possible experience for our clients. As we learn more about today’s changing technology and the need to stay on top of cybersecurity, going digital allows sensitive client material to remain safely guarded, as well as providing an easier, less burdensome and more accurate onboarding process for everyone.

eSignature is accepted on many new account applications, maintenance forms, and managed account forms, such as:

  • Schwab One Personal accounts
  • Schwab One Trust Accounts
  • Company Retirement Accounts (CRA/Pension Trust)
  • Custodial/Minor IRA Applications
  • Account Closure Forms
  • Designated Beneficiary Plan Agreements
  • Investor Checking Accounts
  • IRA Distribution Forms
  • MoneyLink Applications
  • Transfer Your Account (Into or Out of Charles Schwab)

This time-saving eSignature feature is extremely efficient, and it’s easy to use, too! Simply follow the steps below and you’ll be well on your way to mastering electronic signatures.

1) When expecting a form for eSignature, keep an eye out for an email from Charles Schwab that states “Documents for Your Electronic Signature.”

2) Click “Review Documents” at the bottom of that email.

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3) Log into your Schwab account using your Schwab Alliance when prompted. If you don’t know your account information, let us know or contact Schwab Alliance at 1-800-515-2157.

4) Click “Agree/Continue” to agree to the eSignature terms and conditions.

5) Review the document and ensure that it is accurate before signing.

6) When you are ready, choose from two signing options: automatic signature or draw, in which you digitally “draw” your own signature.

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7) Click “Sign” in all places where signature or initial is needed.

8) Click “Finish” to complete the process. DWM will be notified promptly and you will then receive a confirmation email.

 

We could all use some time back in our day, so if you’d like to learn more about eSignature, reach out to us at any time or contact Schwab Alliance at 1-800-515-2157 for more information.

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Bull Market Runs Come in All Lengths

Written by Lester Detterbeck.

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Let me help you with the details of the above chart- though it is difficult to read, it’s quite important.   This graph from First Trust reflects the historical performance of the S&P 500 index from 1926 through June 2018. The blue represents bull markets; the red bear markets. It’s obvious that there is a lot more blue on this chart than red. That’s why we encourage you to “stay invested” through the ups and downs of the markets in a risk appropriate, diversified portfolio.

There are 8 bear markets shown. These represent periods of time when markets went down 20% or more. The longest and largest, from 1929-1932, was caused by the Great Depression. This bear market lasted 2.8 years and represented a cumulative decline of 83.4% overall; 47% per year. Ouch. Other bear markets have been much tamer. The average bear market period for the eight periods shown above lasted 1.4 years with an average cumulative loss of 41%. The bear market in 2008-2009 caused by the financial crisis lasted 1.3 years, with a 51% cumulative decline, 41% per year.

There are 9 bull markets shown. The longest and largest occurred after World War II from 1948 to 1963. This bull market lasted 15.1 years and represented a cumulative total return of 936%, or 17% per year. The average bull market has lasted 9.1 years with a cumulative total return of 476%; 21% per year. Some bull markets have been as short as 2.5 years and there have been other longer bull markets of 12.8, 12.9 and 13.9 years.  Our current bull market started in Spring 2009 and has lasted 9.3 years, with a cumulative total return of 350%; 17.5% per year.

At DWM, we are asked the question: “How long can this bull market continue?” This question seems to be based on a concern that a bull market comes with a pre-ordained expiration date; when it runs out of whatever made it go. However, selling equities because a bull market run is longer than average has been a great way to miss out on lots of gains. Remember, bull market runs come in all lengths.

While a bull market may be technically defined as a period of time after a 20% drop (bear market) has reached its end, it’s probably healthier to view a bull market from an economic perspective. Barry Ritholtz in a Friday Bloomberg article defined a bull market as follows: “An extended period of time, typically lasting 10-20 years, driven by broad economic shifts that create an environment conducive to increasing corporate revenue and earnings. Its most dominant feature is the increasing willingness of investors to pay more and more for a dollar of earnings.” This is exactly what we have seen in periods after WWII, the 1980 and 1990s biotech boom and now the maturation of internet, software and mobile companies.

Bear markets are typically brought about by recessions; often when the markets have gotten overheated (such as the dot.com bubble bust in 2000). Bear markets can also be brought on by a financial crisis, as we had in 2008-2009. Recoveries from financial crises are quite different from recoveries from depressions.   A post crisis recovery is marked by slow and erratic economic growth, weak wage gains and disappointing retail sales. Furthermore, investors, after being burned, remain skittish for years. The 2008-2009 crisis scarred consumers and left them more determined to sock away funds.

Case in point, the Wall Street Journal reported Monday morning that the personal savings rate is up to 7.2% from the 3.3% estimated previously. The new number exceeds the 6.4% average savings rate since 1990 and is almost three time the savings rate in 2005. The “wealth effect” that we saw in the mid 2000s that increased spending and dropped savings rates, is not happening now. This news, along with the reduction in corporate taxes, historically low unemployment and continued increased corporate earnings bodes well for a continuation of the current Bull Market despite ongoing negative factors.

Yes, we don’t know how long this bull market will run. And, we’re not going to try to time it. We do know, at some point, this bull market run will come to its natural end. Before it does, we may see more pullbacks (declines of 5% or more) or corrections (declines of 10% or more).   Remember this graph- lots more blue than red- and stay invested.

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Mother Nature is in Charge!

Written by Ginny Wilson.

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Americans are getting a little disaster weary.  From the horrific wildfires out west to torrential rains and flooding all summer in the east, it has been quite a year.  And in the south and east, we all know what August means…hurricane season is upon us!  Mother Nature is getting on our nerves in 2018! 

How can we protect ourselves to minimize the risks to our homes, our property and our livelihoods?  Mitigating risks from catastrophic events starts with prevention and planning by both government and individuals.  Prevention can start with using damage-resistant building materials, having elevated home designs, enforcing safe building codes, developing flood plain management systems, securing or removing hazards ahead of storms and by having evacuation or escape plans in place.  FEMA has an 81 page guide of Mitigation Ideas to deal with earthquakes, landslides, floods, hurricanes, hail, lightning, tornadoes, severe winter weather and more.  https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1904-25045-2423/fema_mitigation_ideas_final_01252013.pdf  There are many threats coming from our environment, but many things that can be done to lessen some of the painful aftermath of these occurrences. 

We certainly can use property & casualty insurance to plan and prepare for the worst.  In hurricane-prone areas, for example, we have riders for “named storm” or “wind and hail” coverage that comes with our homeowner’s insurance.  The costs of the insurance can be reduced by increasing the amount of a deductible you want to have or, in other words, how much you can afford to pay out of pocket for repairs after a storm.  We also look for extra coverage for those circumstances when there is a widespread event like a hurricane that may drive costs up with higher demand for labor and materials.  Homeowners may want to have an extended coverage rider built in to help with those higher costs.  It is important to evaluate what your risk tolerance is for these situations and how much you want to pay to transfer some of the risk to the insurance company.  If your home is destroyed or badly damaged, do you have a comfortable level of protection for you and your family?

There has been much discussion on the 50 year old National Flood Insurance Program, as well. President Trump recently signed the legislation to extend the debt-ridden program until November 30th.  That means not dealing with necessary reforms until after hurricane season and mid-term elections.  The federal program, which is some $20 billion in debt to the U.S. Treasury, offers subsidized flood insurance to coastal or flood-prone areas where private insurers have pulled out or made it unaffordable.   As it is, the NFIP provides coverage with caps on claims for homes at $250,000 and on property at $100,000.  Many higher-value property owners may choose to also carry “excess” flood insurance to bridge the gap between the federal program caps and the value of their homes and property. 

Unfortunately, the reduced premiums from about 5 million NFIP flood insurance policies nationwide cannot adequately support the claims that have come from recent events, including storms like Sandy, Katrina, Harvey, Maria, Irma and Matthew.  And hurricanes aren’t the only cause of flooding.  We have seen some of these epic rainstorms cause significant inland flooding and damage.   As the head of the SC Department of Insurance said recently, “our entire state is in a flood-zone.”  And this may be true for many areas in the South, East and Midwest.  It is clear there is a need for a flood program that can provide support for affected residents after a storm, especially as we see changing climate conditions and rising sea levels. Lawmakers thus far have been unable to find a bi-partisan fix to the financially strained system.

As homeowners and members of our communities, we should certainly do our share to prepare for these natural events and make sure we have a solid plan in place for our families and our property.  We can maintain our property, keep our own emergency fund and can participate in the insurance coverages available to help protect us.  And we should hope and expect that our legislators - local, state and national- will compromise to find solutions to reform existing programs and to prepare disaster plans that can assist all of us in the event of a catastrophic event.  

At DWM, we use a holistic approach to evaluating your financial plan, including risk management.  We will help you review all of your property & casualty insurance policies to ensure that you have appropriate coverage for you and your family.  Let’s hope Mother Nature stays peaceful for the rest of the year!

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