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DWM is committed to learning for its team, clients and friends. In this changing world, it’s extremely important to stay current in all areas impacting your financial future.

We encourage all of team members to “drill down” on current topics important to you and contribute to our weekly blogs.  Questions from our clients and their families are often featured in our blogs.  

Financial literacy for clients and their families is very important to us.  We generally hold an annual wealth management seminar for all of our clients.  We encourage regular, at least semi-annual, meetings in person with our clients to review family updates, progress on financial goals, asset allocation and performance of investments.  We’re happy to assist younger members of the family as part of our total wealth management program.

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Tick, Tock…Is it Time for your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD)?

Written by Jenny Coletti.

dskljszdkl“Time flies” was a recent quote that I heard from a client.  Remember a long time ago…putting money aside in your retirement accounts, perhaps at work in a qualified traditional 401(k) or to an individual retirement account (IRA)?  It’s easy to ‘forget’ about it because, it was after all, meant to be used many years down the road.  It would be nice to keep your retirement funds indefinitely; unfortunately, that can’t happen, as the government wants to eventually collect the tax revenue from years of tax deferred contributions and growth.

In general, once you reach the age of 70 ½, per the IRS, many of those qualified accounts are subject to a minimum required distribution (RMD) and you must begin withdrawing that minimum amount of money by April 1 of the year following the year that you turn 70 1/2.  Of course, there are a few exceptions with regards to qualified accounts, but as a rule, when you reach 70 ½, you must begin taking money from those accounts per IRS guidelines if you own a traditional 401(k), profit sharing, 403(b) or other defined contribution plan, traditional IRA, Simple IRA, SEP IRA or Inherited IRA.  (Roth IRAs are not required to take withdrawals until the death of the owner and his or her wife.)  Inherited IRAs are more complicated and handled with a few options available to the beneficiary, either by taking lifetime distributions or over a 5 year period.  The importance here, is to be aware that a distribution is needed.  Another word of caution…In some cases, your defined contribution plan may or may not allow you to wait until the year you retire before taking the first distribution, so review of the terms of the plan is necessary.  In contrary, if you are more than a 5% owner of the business sponsoring the plan, you are not exempt from delaying the first distribution; you must take the withdrawal beginning at age 70 1/2, regardless if you are still working.

The formula for determining the amount that must be taken is calculated using several factors.  Basically, your age and account value determine the amount you must withdraw.  As such, the December 31 prior year value of the account must be known and, second, the IRS Tables in Publication 590-B, which provides a life expectancy factor for either single life expectancy or joint life and last survivor expectancy, needs to be referenced.  The Uniform Lifetime expectancy table would be referenced for unmarried owners and the Joint Life and Last Survivor expectancy table would be used for owners who have spouses that are more than 10 years younger and are sole beneficiaries.  It comes down to a simple equation: The account value as of December 31 of the prior year is divided by your life expectancy.  For most of us, your first RMD amount will be roughly 4% of the account value and will increase in % terms as you get older.

It all begins with the first distribution, which will be triggered in the year in which an individual owning a qualified account turns 70 ½.  For example, John Doe, who has an IRA, and has a birthdate of May 1, 1947, will turn 70 ½ this year in 2017 on November 1.  A distribution will need to be made then after November 1, because he will have needed to attain the age of 70 ½ first.  Therefore, the distribution can be taken after November 1 (for 2017), and up until April 1 of the following year in 2018.

Once the first distribution is withdrawn, subsequent annual RMDs need to be taken for life, and are due by December 31.  In this case, John Doe will need to next take his 2018 distribution, using the same formula that determined his first distribution.  This will become a regular obligation of John’s each year.

So, we’ve talked about who, what, why and when, now let’s talk about the where.  Once the distribution amount is calculated, an individual can then choose where he or she would like that money to go.  Depending on circumstances, if the money is not needed for living expenses, it is advised to keep the money invested within one of your other non-qualified accounts such as a Trust or Individual account, i.e. you can elect to make an internal journal to one of your other brokerage accounts.  Alternatively, if you have another thought for the money, you can have it moved to a personal bank account or mailed to your home.  Keep in mind that these distributions, like any distribution from a traditional IRA, are taxed as ordinary income, thus, depending on your income situation, you may wish to have federal or state taxes withheld from the distribution.  At DWM, we can help our clients determine if, and what amount, to be withheld.

Another idea for the money could be a qualified charitable distribution (QCD).  Instead of the money going into one of your accounts, a direct transfer of funds would be payable to a qualified charity.  There are certain requirements to determine whether you can make a QCD.  For starters, the charity must be a 501 (c)(3) and eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions, and, in order for a QCD to count towards your current year’s RMD, the funds must come out of your IRA by the December 31 deadline.  The real beauty about this strategy is that the QCD amount is not taxed as ordinary income. 

It may be pretty scary to know how quickly time flies, but with DWM by your side, we can take the scare out of the situation!

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DWM 2Q17 Market Commentary

Written by Brett Detterbeck.

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“Let the Good Times Roll!” Yes, the 1979 song by Ric Ocasek and the Cars may describe the market’s attitude in the first half of 2017. “You Might Think” the markets are “Magic” or “All Mixed Up” – other classic Cars songs – but, nonetheless, investors should be pleased to see their mid-term results.

With the trading year half-way complete now, “It’s All I Can Do” to give you the major market stories in 2017:

1. All three major non-cash asset classes (equities, fixed income, and alternatives) are positive to start the year.

2. Large-cap equities have significantly outperformed small-cap equities, the largest outperformance to start the year in almost 20 years. Large caps, as represented by the S&P500, were up 3.1% for 2Q17 and up 9.3% Year-to-date (“YTD”) through June 30th. Small caps, as represented by the Russell 2000, were up 2.5% and 5.0%,

3. Growth is significantly outperforming value. In fact, it’s the biggest outperformance to start a year ever besides 2009. The S&P500 Growth Index was up 4.4% 2Q17 & 13.3% 1H17 vs the S&P500 Value Index, up 1.5% and 4.9%, respectively!

4. International stocks are outperforming domestic stocks. The last several years have seen the opposite, but now international is outperforming domestic in what may be a tidal change. The MSCI EAFE Index was up 6.4% for the second quarter and now 13.8% YTD!

5. Minimal volatility – Despite political noise and other headlines around the world, the equity market continues to move forward with little whipsaw. The CBOE Volatility Index, Wall Street’s so-called “fear gauge”, saw its lowest level in over two decades!

Let’s drill down into the various asset classes.

Equities: Obviously, we can see from above that returns in ‘equity land’ were quite decent. In general, stocks rallied on strengthening corporate earnings, improving economies both here and abroad, and continued support from central banks. Earnings from S&P500 companies increased 14%, the best growth since 2011.

Fixed Income: The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index gained 1.5% in the second quarter and is now up 2.3% for the year. The Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index produced even better returns, +2.6% 2Q17 and +4.4% YTD, thanks to stronger results overseas. Many bond investors, including DWM, have been surprised at the falling US government bond yields. The 10-year Treasury Note started the year at 2.45, peaked in March at 2.61, only to close the quarter at 2.30. Why aren’t rates going up? Much of it has to do with skepticism about the passage of Trump’s fiscal agenda. Amongst other things, there has not been the promised major tax reduction nor a flood of fiscal spending yet. As such, inflation expectations weakened in June. However, hawkish comments in the last several days from major central banks, including our US Fed indicating a strong chance that they will announce in September a decision to start shrinking its balance sheet, has caused a reversal in bond yields to start the third quarter. We see the Fed continuing to unwind the past years of stimulus via rate hikes or balance sheet reductions in a well-announced, controlled fashion.

Alternatives:  The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, was up 0.4% for the second quarter and 1.1% YTD. This benchmark gives one a good feel for what alternatives did in general. Of course, there are many flavors of alternatives so drilling down into the category can reveal very different results. Furthermore, alternatives can take the form of either alternative assets and/or alternative strategies. “Traditional” alternative assets like gold* and real estate** fared well through the first half, up 7.8% and 3.2%, respectively. However, another “traditional” alternative in oil (a commodity) suffered, falling back into bear territory. US fracking companies continue to pump at lower prices frustrating OPEC’s goal of price stability via OPEC member supply cuts. A couple of alternative strategies fared differently: managed futures*** have shown losses in the first half, down -5.6%; whereas merger arbitrage**** has had a decent gain of 2.2%. These examples show how alternatives behave independently, thereby providing the ability to reduce the volatility of one’s overall portfolio.

It has been a solid first half for most balanced investors. Looking forward, it’s hard to say what path the markets will take. They could continue this nice trajectory upward - did you know that US stocks were up in January, February, March, April, and May? This is significant because, historically, when US stocks are up in the first 5 months of the calendar year, the average return for US stocks for the full calendar year was +28.8%! This first-five-months-up event has only happened 12 times and in all 12 times, the year ended up in double digits!

However, domestic stocks are getting expensive. The S&P500 now trades at 18x projected earnings over the next 12 months, its highest level in 13 years. Overseas stocks are still a relative bargain compared to the US and one of the reasons for their recent and expected-to-continue outperformance. Furthermore, where the US has raised short-term interest rates four times since the end of 2015, international central banks have been and will remain relatively more accommodative for the near future.

The other scary thing is that the equity and bond markets are sending mixed signals. If bond yields stay down, that would tell us that the bond market sees tepid economic growth, which could be true if all of the pro-growth Trump agenda plans do not come to fruition. For now, the equity markets are signaling otherwise – that this bull market has legs based upon strong corporate results and improving fundamentals. No, Mr. Ocasek, the signals from the bond market and equity market are not “Moving In Stereo.” Only time will tell to see what market is signaling correctly. In the meantime, the goal is to have a portfolio in place that can weather any storm. At DWM, we think our clients’ portfolios are well-positioned for what the markets will throw at us. We look forward to the journey. In fact, and finishing with one last Cars’ classic, “Let’s Go!”

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

*represented by the iShares Gold Trust

**represented by the SPDR Dow Jones Global Real Estate ETF

***represented by the AQR Managed Futures Strategy Fund

****represented by the Vivaldi Merger Arbitrage Fund

 

 

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Happy Fourth of July!

Written by Nick Schiavi.

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We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it. ~William Faulkner

Those who won our independence believed liberty to be the secret of happiness and courage to be the secret of liberty. ~Louis D. Brandeis

From the entire DWM team, we would like to wish you a safe & fun Independence Day!

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