Leverage for the Next Generations: How to Build Credit Effectively

According to a study done by Sallie Mae recently, the younger generations, from teens to young adults, are much more likely to make payments by debit card, cash, or mobile transfer (Venmo, Paypal), than by credit card. In fact, only around 50% of them have credit cards at all. This statistic is leaving some analysts, like those at Fortune magazine (Bloomberg) wondering if credit cards will soon go the way of the video store or Toys R Us. But what are some possible reasons for this shift away from debt lending instruments in young adults, and what lessons can they learn to ensure that picking one up doesn’t lead them to further financial struggles?

One of the big reasons that can easily be identified as an answer to the first question is the looming student loan debt floating over most of those adults’ heads. The average student leaving college in 2017 had roughly $28,650 in student loan debt. On top of this, about 11% of outstanding student loans were 90 days or more delinquent or in default. With the risks of this debt compiling and carrying out, students and young people entering the workforce are less concerned about credit scores and more concerned on making sure they can pay their monthly loan amount, on top of any other recurring expenses. However, the one piece of good news coming out of paying these student loans is that by doing so, one can build up significant credit that will help take the place of missing out on credit card payments. While this avenue won’t leave much room to start borrowing to buy discretionary items, making these payments on time and for the right amount will allow young folk to build a strong credit foundation for the future.

In addition to student loans, many other issues impede those looking to get a credit card early. In 2009, the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act set forth a precedent that banks needed to have more stringent policies with which they lend money, including not offering credit cards to anyone under the age of 21 without a co-signer or proof of income. Even if these are available, with little to no credit history available, some will be turned down for credit card offers. However, most companies offer some sort of secured debt instruments at the least which ask for a deposit upfront as a collateral credit limit. These will allow those with low or new credit scores to earn it while keeping the banks/credit card companies from being at risk. One additional method for those who choose not to use these types of cards is simply to be added as an authorized user on a parent’s credit card. While at a slower pace, this can help out a young person get started even if they don’t use it at all.

Additionally, once their credit is established and starts going in the right direction, they must remain diligent to avoid having what they worked for diminished. There are many different factors that go into a person’s score, however following some key principles will be more than enough to continue pushing this score up:

  1. Use 30% max of the allowed total credit line. This 30% rule is used to ensure that one’s spending habits are in-line with how much they can borrow.
  2. Pay all bills on time. Either through setting up auto-pay or keeping a calendar with important payment deadlines written down, this is one of the most important factors.
  3. Continue using the debt instrument. Even if it’s only being used to pay for small monthly charges or gas bills, continuing to use the card will build up credit.
  4. Pay as much as is feasible. The balance set on the card is not nearly as important as the fact that it’s being used. In order to keep interest down (some go as high as 17%!), one should pay off as much of the balance as they can each month. This is especially important since roughly 25% of millennials have carried a credit card debt for over a year!

All in all, younger generations of people have sincere trepidation when it comes to using credit cards or any other item causing them to incur more debt than they’ve already been exposed to through student loans. They’re still fearful, having grown up through the Great Recession, and face several hurdles even if they decide to pursue getting a credit card. However, once they have them, and through loans, they can still build up a reasonable credit score and attain their financial dreams by remaining diligent and following advice like those points listed above. Please let us know if you have any questions on the above information for you, your family, or your friends.

What will be Your Legacy?

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In the last few years, Elise and I have really gotten into our own family histories. Both sides of Elise’s family came from England, one in the 1830s and one at the turn of the century. My family tree is more diverse. I am 25% German, 25% Finnish, 25% Italian, and, I just recently found out, 25% Jewish. My German ancestors came to America in 1855 and the others came at the turn of the century.

As Elise and I looked back at not only the DNA of our forefathers and foremothers, but also the culture, traditions, stories and values passed on to us, we realize what wonderful legacies we have been given. In a way, we’re all standing on the shoulders of our ancestors.

In the past few years, there’s been a huge increase in people exploring their family history. Ancestry.com sold 1.5 million DNA kits a year ago on Black Friday. The DNA test uncovers your origins. And, Ancestry.com and others have huge online databases and have put together family trees that you can review and expand. This search has caused us to again look at our potential legacy and what it will be. Do you wonder what your legacy will be?

Legacy is defined as “something transmitted by or received from an ancestor or predecessor from the past.” In the simplest terms, it is everything you have worked for in your life. Certainly, that includes money and property, but it’s much more than that. It includes what you have achieved in your work life and your family life, as well as other social relationships and achievements that you ultimately leave behind.

Your estate, on the other hand, is the sum total of everything you own-all of your property (real, tangible and intangible). Your estate requires an “estate plan” to provide for your desired succession of assets, while minimizing taxes and administrative hassles.   If you desire to pass on more than just your assets and transfer your spiritual, intellectual, relational and social capital, you need a “legacy plan.”

The question is not “Will you leave a legacy,” but “What kind of legacy will you leave?” Why not be proactive and intentional in creating your legacy? Why not structure your life in a manner that helps you achieve your purpose and greatest success and safeguards those accomplishments for transfer to future generations? Why not develop and maintain your legacy plan?

If we think of our legacy as a gift, it places an emphasis on the thoughtful, meaningful, and intentional aspects of legacy, as the consequences of what we do will outlive us. What we leave behind is the summation of the choices and actions we make in this life and our spiritual and moral values.

What do you want to leave for your family, the community, your partner or the world? Your legacy can be huge; perhaps a world-changing cause. But it doesn’t need to be a grandiose concept. Instead of wanting to leave a legacy that inspires people to help starving children in the world, you, for example, may relate more with leaving a legacy with your family and friends of how you were kind, accepting and open to others, which might help inspire them to do the same.

A good place to start is to think about the ancestors, mentors and associates whose legacy you admire. What actions can you take to inspire others in the same way?

We encourage you to give some thought to your legacy plan. We’re all creating our legacy every day, whether we realize it or not. And, here at DWM, we’re focused on protecting and enhancing not only your net worth, but your legacy as well.

 

 

Financial Literacy: Money Matters!

As you all know, we provide proactive financial advice on matters such as investment management and value-added services such as tax planning, risk management and estate planning to name a few.  Something you probably didn’t know is that earlier this year, we launched a campaign to promote financial literacy for children and young adults!  It is called the Young Investors program.  Some of our clients have recently become the first recipients of this new program!

Financial literacy is a person’s ability to recognize and use the money and other resources he or she has to get what is needed and wanted.  Another way of saying this is that financial literacy is being able to set goals for using financial resources, make plans, and use the plans to meet financial demands and achieve goals.  To achieve financial literacy, a person needs to have experiences with money.  That is why it is important that children begin to learn about money and its use when they are young.

You might not know this, but financial literacy availability for young children is scarce, primarily because the school systems lack time and budget resources to incorporate financial education into the curriculums.  In fact, only 16 states require any instruction in economics between Kindergarten and 12th grade.  Even worse, only 7 states require students to take courses in personal finance.

There’s been a greater awareness of this educational need in the past 10 years and some financial-literacy advocacy groups have begun to take some steps to fill this educational void.  Some have responded by offering summer camps to young children whose parents want to teach their children the basics of money management.  Feedback from many of the attendees is that, believe it or not, they had fun!  Of course, we want to join in on the fun, and we are also excited to be a part of the solution.

We know that a financial foundation is best achieved when started early, reviewed, as well as reinforced often.  It’s important to teach young children even before they are in school about the concept of money, and that it’s not all about spending!  For example, something simple that a parent can start as early as age 3 can have lasting effects for the future.  Consider this:

Activity: Tell your toddler that you’ll give him a cookie now if he wants it, but you’ll give him two cookies if he waits an extra ten minutes. See what he chooses and try to encourage him to wait for the extra cookie.

Lesson Learned: Be patient and wait for a bigger payoff, rather than always going for instant gratification.

Although it might not look like much, it sets the stage for a less impulsive, more thoughtful response, and hopefully not just one involving money in the future!

Thinking about the scenario above, in an article I read the other day from the Wall Street Journal on personal finance summer camps, a 12 year old boy cited some camp attendance takeaways such as stopping and pausing before making purchases and long term planning!  I suppose it’s true that small things do matter!  And more interesting feedback from the camp directors is that many children ages 10-14 didn’t know what stock and bonds were.  Some thought the investments were a form of real estate.  Clearly, more attention needs to be given to this area.

We love the opportunities these summer camps offer and hope to provide some of our own financial education to our client families year round.  With our financial literacy agenda, our Young Investor program is structured with several tiers of age appropriate interactions and dialogue starters on financial matters for our clients to have with their children or grandchildren.  Age appropriate financial suggestions, tools, links to pertinent financial articles and fun activities to engage their minds are some of the content we will be sharing.  With the importance of starting as early as possible, we literally start at the very beginning, with newly born children/grandchildren, and capture all ages through the early 20s.  Specifically, we break out the tiers in roughly 5 year intervals, so age 0-5 years is the first group, 5-10 years is next, then 10-15 years, with 15-20ish years being the last group.  Our goal is that by age 25, the child or grandchild will be more than ready to begin a lifetime of investing!

Even after your children and grandchildren start their careers, it is our hope that they will join our Emerging Investor program, where they can establish their own brokerage accounts with Charles Schwab and have some of the same great DWM advantages and services as their parents and grandparents.  We are happy to help them by protecting and growing a diversified portfolio to preserve assets and provide moderate growth with minimal risk.

With our help, the young children of today will come to ask for financial assistance and have some of the best mentors in their lives, YOU!  And we all know that money is not an elective in life, so let’s keep the dialogue going with our young generation and keep providing them with good ‘sense’!  We hope you find this program to be a valuable experience.  As always, please let us know your thoughts or if you need financial assistance with a young investor in your life.

Emptying the Nest

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It is an exciting time of year when smiling faces in caps and gowns are seen everywhere! Recently having the pleasure to witness my son’s graduation, the President of the University of South Carolina made sure that the graduates took the time to thank their parents for helping them get to this important occasion. Absolutely! So, congratulations, parents! Turning 21 or graduating from college are exciting milestones and your kids have now reached what we all consider to be the beginning of “adulthood” as they get ready to enter the “real” world. Kids grow up in all different ways and in all different stages – is your young adult ready for launch?

At DWM, we like to offer proactive financial advice for all members of our clients’ families. As your young adult is readying to depart the nest, however that looks, we think this is a good opportunity to provide some education, as they take the reins of their own financial future. Many college-aged kids have had a student checking account and understand how to use their debit card pretty well by now! They probably have some experience with having a job and budgeting for things they want to buy in the short term. However, some of the more complex financial topics can be intimidating for young adults, While they may have a solid background in finance, it is always good to review concepts like compound interest, building good credit, taxes, buying insurance and understanding 401(k)s, for once they land that first “real” job! We might suggest that a good place to start is by getting a copy of The Wall Street Journal. Guide to Starting Your Financial Life by Karen Blumenthal (https://www.amazon.com/Street-Journal-Guide-Starting-Financial/dp/030740708X ). This book covers issues about renting or buying your first home, basic investing, taxes, purchasing health insurance, buying a car, establishing good credit and saving for retirement, among other topics. Might make a perfect college graduation or 21st birthday gift!

In addition, this is a good time to help them make sure all of their accounts are properly set up, titled appropriately and that they have a savings program in place. Reaching the age of majority, which is age 21 for both Illinois and South Carolina, is a good time to change any custodial accounts like a UTMA and UGMA to individual accounts. It may also be helpful to talk about debt, perhaps review student loans and consider opening a credit card account to establish some credit history. Using debt wisely, having a good emergency fund and responsible budgeting are all really valuable conversations and will help your young adult navigate their new financial map.

Encouraging saving and investing is a fundamental lesson and the “pay yourself first” concept is an important one. Remind them that they are paying their future self and that, just like the rewards for eating right, exercising and wearing sunscreen, saving and investing will benefit the health of their future self (as well as their current self!).

One idea that might help is having an automatic savings app like the one found in The College Investor article https://thecollegeinvestor.com/17610/top-automatic-savings-apps/. Also from The College Investor, you can find numerous financial and investing podcasts available that your young adult may take interest in. Here’s the link to get started: https://thecollegeinvestor.com/6778/top-investing-podcasts/. Or maybe they would want a subscription that focuses on the economy, like The Economist or Wall Street Journal.

If working and the business offers it, they should always make sure to contribute to their 401(k) to get the most advantage of any company match. And, if they don’t already have one, starting a Roth account is another great investment savings vehicle, especially while their starting incomes and lower tax brackets will allow them the opportunity to make annual contributions. Up to $5,500 of their earned income can be directly contributed to a Roth account and the compounded gains will never be taxed. Your young adult can set up automatic transfers to investment accounts or savings vehicles so they get used to not seeing those funds in their everyday account, just like 401(k) contributions. It is a great way to plant the seeds for a successful future!

Once the young adult has gotten some traction and they have good financial habits in motion, encourage them to contact us and check out the Emerging Investors program at DWM http://www.dwmgmt.com/investors/. You can learn even more about the EI program by clicking on this link and accessing one of our recent blogs written by Jake Rickord http://dwmgmt.com/archives-blog/index.php/2017/11/. Our Emerging Investors program offers a specialized financial planning model with DWM investment strategies that uses the automated Schwab IIP platform. Our goal is to help them graduate to full DWM Total Wealth Management clients down the road. The best way to reach the level of a TWM client is not just by higher earning, but by stronger and earlier investing. We love to educate and help others plan for their financial future. We are always available if you or your young adult have any questions and would certainly welcome feedback.   Please let us know how we can be of assistance!

 

The Money Talk

It’s no secret that today’s standard high school and college curriculums are missing a few very important details. One of the most overlooked areas is basic financial education. Discussing finances with your children can be a difficult topic to broach, but it is critical to their success in the long run.

One common misconception of having “the money talk” is the idea that kids must be sheltered from financial issues. In some instances this is absolutely true, but having a basic discussion about finances and instilling good values in your children is important. “The money talk” shouldn’t be seen as taboo, but rather as an opportunity to guide your kids and help them navigate potentially tricky financial issues and decisions that arise.

Here are some tips to help as you approach “the money talk.”

 

1.Be honest.

 

Chances are that at some point in your life, you’ve experienced highs and lows in your finances. No need to hide it! These experiences provide a learning opportunity for your kids and allow you to be open and frank about the reality of financial decisions—they can handle it.

If you ran up debts in your past and had difficulty paying these back, this serves as an excellent teaching moment. Learning from those you respect can be just as effective as learning the lesson on your own.

Also, this may go without saying, but be careful not to spread falsehoods about your current financial situation. Remember, your kids can handle it and will almost always know when you’re not being completely honest with them.

 

2. Talk in values, not figures.

 

If you’re hesitant to share your financial situation with your children, that is normal. You are certainly not alone on this, but it doesn’t have to be scary. The good news is your kids don’t always want to know (or need to know) every detail of your financial life. Don’t sweat the small stuff—instead, focus on teaching them the basics. Ask yourself, what do they need to know, and what is often missed in standard education? Children should have a solid understanding of concepts such as saving, budgeting, paying down debt, developing healthy spending habits, and compounding interest.

 

3. Use real-world experiences.

 

Life is full of sporadic but important financial lessons that can be found in everyday experiences. It’s up to you to look for these opportunities and expand on them with your children.

If you’re going to the bank, you may consider taking your children with you. This is a great time to demonstrate how transactions work and, if applicable, how an ATM works. To take it a step further, you may even begin the discussion on how money can generate interest.

When your children start their first jobs and start receiving paychecks, this is a convenient time to discuss the importance of budgeting, paying bills, and taxes. Talk through what their goals are for each paycheck and how much they may need to save in order to accomplish these goals.

If you are planning a family trip, consider letting them in on the budgeting. Showing them your budget, planning activities you want to accomplish with this budget, and building a trip around this information will help make financial planning seem tangible to them. This may also be a good time to remind your kids that goals often require sacrifice, and not every trip activity will be accomplished.

Try giving your kids an allowance and taking them to the grocery store. The grocery store can be a clear example of “needs” vs. “wants.” Your children need nutrients but most certainly would like to have a few candies as well. However, with a set allowance, they won’t be able to afford them all!

In closing, whether you realize it or not, you play an important role in your children’s financial future. In their early years, they rely heavily on you for financial advice to help them form healthy financial habits (and the occasional $20 bill for the movies). At DWM, we feel it is essential to educate your children about finances early on, so they can be better prepared for the future. That’s why we created our new Emerging Investor program to help younger folks invest early on and get started on the path to financial freedom! To learn more about this exciting new program, check out the full description here: http://dwmgmt.com/blogs/123-2017-11-29-20-49-47.html.