The Money Talk

It’s no secret that today’s standard high school and college curriculums are missing a few very important details. One of the most overlooked areas is basic financial education. Discussing finances with your children can be a difficult topic to broach, but it is critical to their success in the long run.

One common misconception of having “the money talk” is the idea that kids must be sheltered from financial issues. In some instances this is absolutely true, but having a basic discussion about finances and instilling good values in your children is important. “The money talk” shouldn’t be seen as taboo, but rather as an opportunity to guide your kids and help them navigate potentially tricky financial issues and decisions that arise.

Here are some tips to help as you approach “the money talk.”

 

1.Be honest.

 

Chances are that at some point in your life, you’ve experienced highs and lows in your finances. No need to hide it! These experiences provide a learning opportunity for your kids and allow you to be open and frank about the reality of financial decisions—they can handle it.

If you ran up debts in your past and had difficulty paying these back, this serves as an excellent teaching moment. Learning from those you respect can be just as effective as learning the lesson on your own.

Also, this may go without saying, but be careful not to spread falsehoods about your current financial situation. Remember, your kids can handle it and will almost always know when you’re not being completely honest with them.

 

2. Talk in values, not figures.

 

If you’re hesitant to share your financial situation with your children, that is normal. You are certainly not alone on this, but it doesn’t have to be scary. The good news is your kids don’t always want to know (or need to know) every detail of your financial life. Don’t sweat the small stuff—instead, focus on teaching them the basics. Ask yourself, what do they need to know, and what is often missed in standard education? Children should have a solid understanding of concepts such as saving, budgeting, paying down debt, developing healthy spending habits, and compounding interest.

 

3. Use real-world experiences.

 

Life is full of sporadic but important financial lessons that can be found in everyday experiences. It’s up to you to look for these opportunities and expand on them with your children.

If you’re going to the bank, you may consider taking your children with you. This is a great time to demonstrate how transactions work and, if applicable, how an ATM works. To take it a step further, you may even begin the discussion on how money can generate interest.

When your children start their first jobs and start receiving paychecks, this is a convenient time to discuss the importance of budgeting, paying bills, and taxes. Talk through what their goals are for each paycheck and how much they may need to save in order to accomplish these goals.

If you are planning a family trip, consider letting them in on the budgeting. Showing them your budget, planning activities you want to accomplish with this budget, and building a trip around this information will help make financial planning seem tangible to them. This may also be a good time to remind your kids that goals often require sacrifice, and not every trip activity will be accomplished.

Try giving your kids an allowance and taking them to the grocery store. The grocery store can be a clear example of “needs” vs. “wants.” Your children need nutrients but most certainly would like to have a few candies as well. However, with a set allowance, they won’t be able to afford them all!

In closing, whether you realize it or not, you play an important role in your children’s financial future. In their early years, they rely heavily on you for financial advice to help them form healthy financial habits (and the occasional $20 bill for the movies). At DWM, we feel it is essential to educate your children about finances early on, so they can be better prepared for the future. That’s why we created our new Emerging Investor program to help younger folks invest early on and get started on the path to financial freedom! To learn more about this exciting new program, check out the full description here: http://dwmgmt.com/blogs/123-2017-11-29-20-49-47.html.

LOOKING THROUGH THE GENDER LENS

Woman_with_wealth.jpgLast week, we celebrated International Women’s Day. Adopted by the UN in 1975, we recognize this global day of advocacy to celebrate women’s work and to promote women’s rights. It has been a troubling year hearing women’s stories of facing sexual harassment in the workplace and elsewhere, but yet a momentous year of watching women gain a collective voice against this treatment. The #Me Too movement has catapulted women’s rights to one of the top national conversations and focused attention on the goal to removing gender bias in many aspects of our culture. You’ve come a long way, baby, indeed!!

This conversation has also put the spotlight on the gender gap for pay and hiring practices. According to an article in Businessweek, working women still earn between 57% – 80% of the salary of a working man, depending on whether they are white, black or Hispanic. Women’s pay is catching up, but is predicted not to achieve equal status until 2058. This affects all of us, as women have less opportunity to save, contribute to Social Security and participate in the economy. Saving adequate retirement savings is harder for women. Women are able to save less for several reasons, the gap in pay being one of them. There may be career interruptions for children, a need to pay for child care while in the workplace, higher healthcare costs and, of course, women live longer, which all puts a strain on women’s ability to save for retirement and have adequate means when older.

Adding to the difficulty in obtaining adequate saving levels, research has shown that women are, on average, less risk tolerant in their financial decisions than men. According to Associate Professor from the University of Missouri Rui Yao, women and men do not think of investment risk differently, but income uncertainty affects women differently from men. That uncertainty may result in women keeping funds in asset allocations with lower expected returns to “buffer the risk of negative income shocks”. This can be a concern for any investor with low levels of risk tolerance, as they might have greater difficulty reaching their financial goals and building adequate retirement wealth because they are less likely to invest in more growth-oriented asset classes with bigger returns, like equities. “Risk tolerance is one of the most important factors that contributes to wealth accumulation and retirement,” said Rui Yao. At DWM, we review the risk tolerance of all of our clients very carefully. We make sure that their investment strategy matches well with their capacity for risk, as well as their tolerance for it, while making sure that they can achieve their goals for financial independence.

Despite fighting issues of sexual harassment and glass ceilings in the workplace, women have made some remarkable gains in their financial status. In 40% of American families, the primary breadwinner is a woman and, for the first time in history, women control the majority of personal wealth in the U.S. In fact 48% of all millionaires are women. Also, women will benefit immensely in the future transfer of wealth – from husbands who are older and die sooner or parents who now bestow equal inheritances to sons and daughters. Breadwinner women may control more wealth, but there is still a shortfall in other areas.

There are many arguments for equalizing our gender dynamics at home and at work – there is no doubt that enabling women to achieve their full potential is certainly better for women and their families. There is also a universal financial argument to be made. By some estimates, according to Sallie Krawchek of Ellevate Network, if women were fully engaged in the economy, GDP would increase by 9%! Ms. Krawchek’s article also cites multiple studies that conclude “companies with diverse leadership teams” outperform other companies on metrics including higher returns on capital, lower risk and greater innovation. This translates into healthier corporate environments that are rewarded on the bottom line. That is good for men, women and families! All of the reasons for closing the gender gap are important, but the financial benefits for everyone are significant and certainly can’t be considered controversial. As someone once said, “It’s the economy, stupid”!

While there remain roadblocks to women achieving equality in their financial status with men, we do think having these national conversations and educating both women and men on the benefits of empowering women will begin to make progress. We agree that deficiencies in retirement savings and the economic engagement of women are highly related and we hope changes are coming. At DWM, we look at the total wealth management for all of our clients equally and with consideration for every one of their life situations. We know that anything that has a positive effect on the financial success of women is good for us all.

Time for a financial caddie?

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“Pro Jock.” “Looper.” That’s what I strived to be in my early days of youth. Those that are familiar with the movie Caddyshack may recognize the reference and, yes, one of my first jobs was that as a caddie. And whereas the Caddyshack movie was quite whacky, in real life the lessons learned by growing up as a golf caddie were life lessons and things as a “financial caddie” I still exhibit today.

  1. Preparation / Guidance – a good golf caddie (“GC”) should arrive to the ball before the golfer and remove any surrounding debris and have yardage-to-the-green ready for the golfer. This is quite similar to how a financial caddie (“FC”) prepares his client for the next big shot in their life, by assessing the current investment environment and creating an Investment Policy Statement/target asset allocation mix and chart of course that can help the client navigate “all 18 holes”.
  2. Paying attention – a good GC needs to be paying attention to their golfer’s needs, i.e. is she cold and needs a jacket from the bag?, is her ball dirty and in need of cleaning?, is she familiar with what the next hole does? A good FC is one that is not only paying attention but being proactive with the client’s needs, i.e. running tax projections to make sure there are no surprises come tax time, running estate planning flow reports to make sure that the clients’ estate planning is in-line with their wishes, etc.
  3. Commitment – I remember some caddies that would quit – sometimes physically, sometimes mentally, sometimes both – out there. That’s bad caddying and a lack of commitment and perseverance. Some days will be beautiful, sunny ones but some will be stormy with difficult conditions. Like a good GC, a good FC makes you, the client, the priority and makes sure that our professional attention, focus and best efforts always have you in mind.
  4. Resourcefulness – Every “loop” is different, every golf shot is different, every round is different the same way in the financial world there are always new things being thrown at you. A good GC and FC will embrace change and always look for new possibilities to solve the problem, unravel the puzzle, and complete the task.
  5. Attitude – the good caddies know that they need to show up to the caddie shack early in the morning with a smile and a hard-working, respectful attitude if they want to earn the continual right of “toting the bag”. At DWM, one of our most valued qualities is a conscientious attitude used to apply diligence for the timeliness of project completion and adherence to punctuality in schedules in respect to the clients we gratefully

That being said, I’d like to share a wonderful experience with you. Schwab & Co invited my father/business partner, Les, to play in the Schwab Cup Senior Pro-Am last week. Pros like Bernard Langer, Vijay Singh, Fred Couples, Lee Janzen, and our new favorite, Brandt Jobe were all there. These are golfers my dad grew up watching and idolizing. Les was able to share the course with these guys and, after a 20+ year break, I came out of golf caddie retirement to strap on the bag one last time!

“So, I tell them I’m a pro jock, and who do you think they give me?” No, not the Dalai Lama, but Les Detterbeck, himself. Third generation of the first Lester. The long putter, the grace, not yet bald… striking. So I’m on the first tee with him. I give him the driver. He hauls off and whacks one – big hitter, the Lester – long, into a one foot crevice, a couple miles east of the bottom of the desert, right on the fairway. And do you know what the Lester says? Gunga galunga…gunga…No, actually he says, “give me the 4 wood” and the Lester proceeds to put it onto the green and two putt for a gross par, net birdie to start our Pro-Am team off in the right direction.

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It was exhilarating day to say the least. We didn’t win the event, but we had a once-in-a-lifetime day, coming just a couple weeks before Les’ 70th birthday. And whereas I doubt I will ever caddie for someone in an official tournament ever again, I know that I will always strive to do my best as a FINANCIAL CADDIE to the wonderful clients we currently serve and future ones.

Of course, this was the first time I had officially caddied in over twenty years. I thought I did a splendid job, my gift to Les for his 70th. Back in the 80’s, I’d be happy to earn $20-$40 for the round to go blow at the local music shop on a few CDs. But this time… there was no money; only total consciousness. So I got that going for me, which is nice.

(*If you haven’t figured by now, Caddyshack is the author’s favorite move of all time. Happy BDay, Les! Gunga Galunga!)

Now’s the time to plan your 529!

Summmerrrtttime!  Every day in the summer at our office here in Charleston, we are regaled with the carriage tour drivers’ versions of this famous song from Porgy & Bess.  We end up having that song stuck in our head a lot of the time!  Already the ads for back to school sales are appearing and it reminds us that, while the “livin’ is easy” right now, the hustle of getting kids ready to head back to school isn’t far away.  We hate to interrupt your summer fun, but it is a good idea to get ready for college tuition payments no matter what age those students are!

We wanted to highlight the particular advantages of using 529 plans for funding your education purposes, as it is the most cost-effective way to manage the expenses of higher education.  Enacted in 1996, Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Service Code allows an account owner to establish a plan to pay for a beneficiary’s qualified higher education expenses using two types of plans – a pre-paid tuition program or the more popular, state-administered college savings plan.  The beneficiary can be a family member or friend or an owner can set up a 529 account for their own benefit.  Anyone can then donate to the account, regardless of the owner or beneficiary.  Funds can be deposited and used almost immediately (need to wait 10 days) or can be invested and grown until needed.  Surprisingly, according to a Wall Street Journal article recently, only 14% of Americans plan to use 529s to pay for college.

Although there is no allowable federal tax deduction for 529 contributions, the income and gain in the account are not taxable, as long as they are used for qualified education expenses.  These qualified expenses include tuition, room & board, books and, in a 2015 legislative change, payments for many technological expenses like a computer, printer or internet access, even if not specifically required by the educational institution.  The costs for off-campus housing can also qualify, as long as the amount used matches the average cost of resident-living at your university.  Many states, like SC and IL, also allow a tax deduction for 529 contributions to in-state plans.  Another recent legislative change allows for an increase from one to two annual investment selection changes per year, unless there is a rollover and then a change can be made at that time.  This gives the 529 owner a little more benefit, flexibility and control over their accounts.

When funding 529 accounts, we recommend that our clients not fund more than 50% of the total cost of estimated expenses for the education of their student before the student selects and starts college.  One nice feature about 529 plans is that they are transferrable to a sibling or other close family member, if a student doesn’t use or exhaust their entire 529 account.    However, you don’t want to overfund an account and then have some leftover.  Only the gains in the account are taxed, but there is a 10% penalty on the account if the funds are withdrawn and not used for qualified education expenses.  Another reason for not overfunding is that there are many scholarships available – you may have an accomplished science whiz or an amazing athlete that earns scholarship money.  Once final amounts of tuition requirements are determined, 529 account owners can make necessary additional contributions to take advantage of tax benefits.

There are many scholarship opportunities available for those who take the time to look and apply.  Checking with the high school guidance counselor, local civic groups or community organizations about scholarships or awards opportunities can give your high school student some hands on involvement in paying for their own education!  All high school seniors should also fill out the annual FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).  There are many opportunities for earning money for college and nothing should be ruled out.

We know that using 529 accounts is the least expensive way to pay for college.  Research shows that the most expensive way to pay is by taking out student loans or paying out of pocket as the student needs it.  At DWM, we want to help you strategize how to save for and pay for any education expenses that you may have before you, no matter when those costs are expected.  We can help you evaluate the various state plans and the investment options in the 529s and calculate an appropriate annual or lump sum amount of savings.  We will be glad to help make your summertime livin’ easy and carefree!  Okay, now back to summer fun…already in progress!