Did You Ever Dream That You Forgot Your Pants? No Problem.

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Have you ever dreamed that you are walking into a college final exam and you have done no studying for it?   Better yet, in the dream, have you walked into the exam and forgotten your pants? I can tell you from personal experience, I have had dreams where both events occur. Fortunately, I’m pleased to report, this has never happened in real life and likely and hopefully never will. More importantly, though, I now know that my dreams have served an all-important psychological function-working out my anxieties in a low-risk environment and preparing for the future.

Most of the emotions we feel in dreams are negative; including fear, helplessness, anxiety and guilt. Yet, this night-time unpleasantness may, in fact, provide an advantage during the day.

All sleep is not the same. Dreams typically occur in REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, when our brains are more active. You cycle between REM and non-REM sleep. First, comes non-REM sleep followed by REM sleep and then the cycle starts over again. Babies spend 50% of their sleep in the REM stage, compared to only 20% for adults. Deep sleep which is non-REM is known for the changes in your body, not your brain; when your body repairs and regrows tissues, builds bone and muscle and strengthens the immune system.

REM sleep is crucial for mental and physical health, yet we generally slough off the dreams as being silly, juvenile, and self-indulgent and simply get on with our day. Because dreams seldom make literal sense, it can be easier to discard them than to try to interpret them. In fact, according to Alice Robb, author of “Why We Dream,” dreams can help us “consolidate new memories and prune extraneous pieces of information.” Further, they may provide a time for the brain to experiment with a wider array of associations of the facts and outcomes and sometimes help solve problems.

Finnish evolutionary psychologist Dr. Antti Revonsuo studied the perplexing question of why our minds subject us to something so unpleasant. He reasoned that if our ancestors could practice dealing with dangerous situations, perhaps battling a mastodon, as they slept, they might have an advantage when they had to confront them in the next day. Research on animals fits into this theory. REM deprived rats struggle with survival-related tasks such as navigating a maze, while rats with REM sleep apparently dream about this upcoming challenge and perform better.

In 2014 researchers at the Sorbonne interviewed a group of aspiring doctors about to take their medical school entrance exam. Nearly all of the 719 students who replied had dreamt about the exam at least once beforehand and, understandably, almost all of those dreams were nightmares. They had dreamed that they got lost on the way to the exam facility, that they couldn’t understand the questions and that they had written their answers with invisible ink. Ouch. But, when the researchers compared the results of the exam with dreaming patterns, they found that students who dreamed more often performed better in real life.

Ms. Robb suggests that, while we tend to focus on and discuss dreams that are strange, most dreams are less bizarre than we think. A study in the 60s by psychologist Frederick Snyder of 600 dream reports showed that “dreaming consciousness” was, in fact, “a remarkably faithful replica of waking life.” He found that 9 out of 10 dreams “would have been considered credible descriptions of everyday experience.”

In another study, Dr. Revonsuo and Dr. Christina Salmivalli, analyzed hundreds of dreams from a group of their students and discovered that the emotions in the dream were usually appropriate to the situation, even if the situation itself was unusual. “The dreamer’s own self was ‘well preserved.’” Effectively, even in dreams, we know who we are.

So, go ahead and get a good night’s sleep tonight and look forward to the REM dreaming phase. It may feel negative and not be all that comfortable. However, it just might give your brain some time to work through some important matters and find solutions.

Pizza Meets Technology

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What’s your favorite pizza? In Chicago, I love Lou Malnati’s deep-dish, in the Lowcountry, Grimaldi’s Brooklyn Bridge, with ricotta and Italian sausage, is amazing. And, now, thousands of years after pizza was invented, it too is being impacted by technology. Recently, the WSJ, in their “The Future of Everything” section, focused on the impact technology is having at Domino’s Pizza.

But first, let’s take a look at the history of pizza. Archeologists in Sardinia have found ancient remains from the 1st millennium B.C. of flattened bread that was apparently very popular. Writings in the 6th Century B.C. mentioned soldiers baking flatbread and covering it with cheese and dates. Stone ovens are mentioned in the 3rd B.C. when Roman historians described “flat round of dough dressed with olive oil, herbs, and honey baked in stones.” Excavations made in Pompeii show that in the 1st Century B.C. retail shops were making and selling pizzas.

Modern pizza seems to have come from Naples in the 16th century. Tomatoes from the New World combined with bread and other products to produce the earliest form of modern pizza. The Queen of Naples in the mid-18th century had a special oven in her palace for making pizzas. Antica Pizzeria Port’Alba, the first modern pizzeria, opened in Naples in 1830. By the end of the 19th century, citizens of Naples were consuming pizza for breakfast, lunch and dinner.

In the early 1900s, the first Italian pizza in America was introduced by street peddlers who walked up and down Taylor Street in Chicago. New York City got the first pizza license in 1905. Pizzerias spread across the U.S. in the early 20th century. In 1943, Chicago’s Ike Sewell invented the deep-dish pizza. In the 1950s, celebrities of Italian origin, including Frank Sinatra and Joe DiMaggio, promoted pizza. The first frozen pizza was released in 1957. Pizza Hut started in 1958, Little Caesar’s in 1959 and Domino’s in 1967.

These days, pizza is a huge business. According to 2018 “Pizza Power” report, the worldwide pizza market was $134 billion, with U.S. the top country, at $45 billion annually. There are 75,000 U.S. pizzerias and the top 50 chains have average unit sales of almost $600,000, with annual growth overall at 12%. The big winners were reported to be those who focused on consumer needs by embracing “websites, social media, online ordering and delivery technology.”

Domino’s, with 6,000 U.S. outlets is the world’s largest pizza company. Yet, their just-issued 2Q19 quarterly report showed slower growth. Their stock has gone “cold”- investors have “lost their appetite” for Domino’s Pizza. Technology has fueled new and improved competitors, delivery apps, online ordering and quality.

The growth of online ordering through companies like Grubhub and Door Dash has impacted Domino’s business. Domino’s, with its own delivery drivers, has declined to form partnerships with them. Also, food delivery companies, such as Uber Eats and Postmates, have jumped into the business aggressively with free or discounted delivery during the March NCAA tournament period with great success. Even though Domino’s hasn’t raised their prices on pizzas in over a decade, increases in same-store sales are slowing.

Ritch Allison, CEO of Domino’s, was recently interviewed by the WSJ for its “The Future of Everything” section. Mr. Allison was clear that “Pizza will endure. However, almost everything about how a pizza is made and transported to the customer is undergoing a high-tech shift.”

Domino’s has maintained that it won’t outsource delivery. Instead it will invest in operations to make delivery more efficient and better for customers. Low unemployment and rising minimum wages in some cities are pushing up labor costs and making it harder to find drivers. They’re working on a driverless vehicle smaller than a golf cart, with compartments that can be heated up or chilled. They are looking at drones and even deliveries by bike and scooter riders.

Mr. Allison indicated that they are working on upgrading their “Dom” automated telephone answering service. They’ve been missing customer calls during busy times. Their goal is to answer every call and hopefully build bigger orders as well. They hope improved data on customers will help them produce better menus, adding and deleting items over time based on demand patterns.

For Domino’s “Robots will help, but not replace human pizza makers.”   Robots can put dough balls on trays, but Mr. Allison wants to “keep the magic of pizza making” with humans. Domino’s is currently using, in locations in Australia and New Zealand, artificially intelligent cameras to photograph and grade each pie based on different criteria. This quality audit is designed to ensure that a subpar pizza never reaches a customer’s door. They hope to extend this quality method to operations worldwide.

Yes, even our beloved pizzas, that humanity has been eating for thousands of years, and hopefully for many more thousands as well, are being impacted by technology. Hopefully, that will make it easier in the future for all of us to get our perfect pizza at the perfect time.

IT’S SUMMERTIME! LET’S TALK BASEBALL: IT’S MORE THAN JUST A GAME

First, full disclosure. I love baseball. I was born 2 blocks from Wrigley Field and walked to Cub games alone when I was 7 and sat in the bleachers. As a lifetime Cub fan it’s a mixed blessing- a life of both affection and affliction. Happily, the Cubs are having another good year and the White Sox are resurging. Baseball is a fun game for sure, but it’s more than just a game. This week’s Economist’s article “Baseball and Exceptionalism” examines how our national pastime reflects America’s desire to be different and successful.

You may have heard that a young man named Abner Doubleday invented baseball in 1839 in Cooperstown, New York. Doubleday later was credited with firing the first shot for the Union at Ft. Sumter and became a Civil War hero.

Actually, that story is untrue. Doubleday was at West Point in 1839 and he never claimed to have anything to do with baseball. The Doubleday myth was created by A.J. Spalding, a sporting goods magnate. In the 1930s the National Baseball Hall of Fame was established in Cooperstown. However, if you visit Cooperstown today, you’ll see a plaque admitting that the Doubleday myth is untrue.

The real history of baseball, like many things, is more complicated than that. References to games resembling baseball in the United States date back to the American Revolution. Its most direct ancestors appear to be two English games; cricket and rounders. However, American promoters in the 19th century, including Mr. Spalding, saw political and commercial profits to be gained from promoting a uniquely American game that was both different and exceptional. Actually, no surprise, American baseball teams raided cricket clubs (Philadelphia for example had 100 such clubs) for players, while the great American poet Walt Whitman proclaimed “Baseball is our game- the American game.”

Anglophobia, stirred by Britain’s trade with the Confederacy during the Civil War, pushed the issue. Alarmed by the persistent claim that baseball was invented by the English, Spalding bankrolled a commission, fueled by “patriotism and research” to produce a better explanation. The Doubleday myth was the result.

For Spalding and many Americans then and now, baseball was (and is) more than just a game. It reflects the triumphs, defeats and tensions of our nation. American baseball is the story of our country over the last 150 years. A common endeavor, yet with periodic problems and disputes between communities, owners and workers, and cultures. Mexicans, Irish, Jewish and African Americans saw baseball as a point of entry to American culture. Author Philip Roth called baseball “this game that I loved with all my heart, not simply for the fun of playing it…but for the mythic and aesthetic dimension it could give to a boy’s life in participating in a core part of America.”

The Economist makes three very good points about Americans creating, and in many cases still believing, the untrue Doubleday myth about our national pastime. First, America is often less exceptional- because, like baseball, it is more of a “European- accented hybrid”- than it considers itself to be. Second, there are costs to self-deception such as isolation in sport and otherwise. For example, right now 2 billion people are avidly watching the Cricket World Cup while baseball remains basically an American game. Third, our country’s belief in our exceptionalism may be at the core of our achievements. Believing you are different and exceptional increases your confidence and that can produce greater success.

Henry Ford is known not only for his fantastic success with his automobile empire but also for his great quotes. I really like this one: “Whether you think you can, or you think you can’t- you’re right.” Henry Ford inspired Americans to be more confident-exceptional and different- and therefore more successful. Spalding’s myth about Abner Doubleday inventing baseball isn’t true, but certainly has helped Americans believe that we are exceptional and different and this had helped lead to many of our successes.

And, now, “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.”

Can Money Buy You Happiness?

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Happy New Year!! We hope you had a fantastic holiday season. Now, it’s on to 2019 with planning and resolutions for the New Year. What are your goals? More money? More Happiness? More Joy? As you tackle these huge questions of money and meaning, we’d like to offer you some ideas.

Does money buy happiness? King Midas was rich, but his gold didn’t bring him happiness.   That’s because there’s a difference between being rich and being wealthy. Brian Portnoy, in his book, “The Geometry of Wealth,” articulates this well: “Being rich is having ‘more.’ The push for more is a treadmill of which satisfaction is typically fleeting. Wealth, by contrast, is funded contentment. It is the ability to underwrite a meaningful life- however one chooses to define that.”

Money, of course, is a huge part of our daily lives. Our life cycle with money includes earning, spending, saving and investing. Our first paycheck shows us our ability to earn and sustain ourselves. Next, where do we spend the money and how much do we save? Lastly, as we accumulate money, we choose to put our financial capital at risk to grow at a higher rate of return than cash. Money is like the oil in your car; without it, the car grinds to a halt, but with it, YOU still have to steer the car in the right direction.

Sonja Lyubomirsky in “Pursuing Happiness,” identifies three factors which determine happiness/human fulfillment. These are disposition (who you are), circumstances (what you face) and intentions (what you do). Her research shows that outcomes are impacted as follows: 50% comes from disposition, 40% from intentions and 10% from circumstances. The good news is that we can control our intentions; which, of course, is our review, planning, implementation and monitoring of our life planning.

As Daniel Kahneman (featured in earlier DWM blogs) has proven, how well we handle our intentions and planning has a lot to do with “Thinking Fast and Slow.” The fast brain is the home of impressions, impulse, and feelings. The slow brain is engaged when we are deliberately thinking and making informed choices. The two systems work together; the key is using our slow brain as we shape a life of money and meaning. The process of building and executing a plan can be, in itself, a source of happiness.

In 2015, the Dalai Lama and Archbishop Desmond Tutu met and discussed life; recapped in “The Book of Joy.” They separated happiness into two categories; one, experienced happiness, which comes and goes with daily pleasures, and, two, reflective happiness, the achievement of joy, which takes work. Dr. Portnoy identifies the four pillars of joy:

  • Connection-the need to belong
  • Control-the need to direct one’s own destiny
  • Competence-the need to be good at something worthwhile
  • Context-need for a purpose outside of one’s self

These “Four C’s” are at the heart of funded contentment. And while contentment can be achieved by all, including those in lower levels of income, money helps.

Dr. Kahneman found in his research that happiness directly increases as income increases. However, after about $75,000 of annual income (per person), experienced happiness levels out. The concept is that good and bad moods come and go at the same pace for someone making $100,000 per year as compared to someone making $1 million per year. However, reflective happiness, or funded contentment, does increase with higher incomes for many people. This is because at higher levels of income, money, allocated wisely, can underwrite the Four C’s, which constitute reflective happiness. Money can be used for both experienced and reflective happiness and, by using both our fast brain and our slow brain, we can achieve both.

In our crazy, chaotic world, it’s important not to let our fast brain guide all of our intentions. We need to have a plan and a process and be ready to adapt it as the world changes. True happiness takes work. Our goal, as wealth managers, is to assist you with a process not only to protect and grow your money, but also to help you achieve “funded contentment”- the ability to underwrite a meaningful life- however you choose to define that.

Good luck on your planning for 2019. Please let us know if you would like us to help.

Total Eclipse of the Sun

We all spend a lot of time thinking about our Sun.  In the summer, we want to know if clouds or rain will obscure the Sun’s heat and brilliance and perhaps impact our plan for outdoor activities.  We must think about the Sun’s intensity by protecting our skin and our eyes from the powerful UV rays with sunscreen, protective clothing and eyewear.  Sunrise and sunset mark the ebb and flow in our days with beautiful atmospheric displays.  The Sun, as we all know, keeps us alive on this planet!

On August 21st, our moon will pass between the earth and the Sun, throwing shade across a wide path of the United States that includes Charleston, SC.  Temperatures will drop, the sky will darken and animals will be confused about what to do. The Great American Eclipse of 2017 will begin in the Charleston area with the first phase at 1:17 pm, will hit the peak or “totality “ period at 2:46 pm and will finally end around 4:10 pm.  This is the first total solar eclipse to occur in the US since 1979 and is the biggest astronomical event that America has seen in years.

There are five stages to a solar eclipse and there are some interesting features to look for during each phase, for those of you getting ready to participate.  Here are the 5 phases:

1. Partial eclipse begins (1st contact): The Moon starts becoming visible over the Sun’s disk. The Sun looks as if a bite has been taken from it.

2. Total eclipse begins (2nd contact): The entire disk of the Sun is covered by the Moon. Observers in the path of the Moon’s umbra, or shadow, may be able to see Baily’s beads and the diamond ring effect, just before totality.  Baily’s beads are the outer edges of the Sun’s corona peeking out from behind the moon and the diamond ring effect occurs when one last spot of the Sun shines like a diamond on a ring before being obscured.

3. Totality and maximum eclipse: The Moon completely covers the disk of the Sun. Only the Sun’s corona, or outer ring, is visible. This is the most dramatic stage of a total solar eclipse. At this time, the sky goes dark, temperatures can fall, and birds and animals often go quiet. The midpoint of time of totality is known as the maximum point of the eclipse. Observers in the path of the Moon’s umbra may be able to see Baily’s beads and the diamond ring effect, just after totality ends.

4. Total eclipse ends (3rd contact): The Moon starts moving away, and the Sun reappears.

5. Partial eclipse ends (4th contact): The Moon stops overlapping the Sun’s disk. The eclipse ends at this stage in this location.

Historically, solar eclipses have been significant events and have been recorded dating back to 5,000 BC.  There are writings of mathematical predictions of eclipses from ancient Greece, Babylon and China.  Rulers and leaders often used the predictions of astronomical events to gain power or to offer reassurance to a fearful population.  George Washington was grateful for a heads up about a coming solar eclipse prior to a battle in 1777 so he could alleviate any superstitions that his troops may have.  And scientists have used the opportunity of an eclipse to study the Sun, measure distances and features in the universe and learn about the Earth’s atmosphere.  The discovery of hydrogen can be credited to a solar eclipse and a solar eclipse in 1919 provided observational data for Einstein’s theory of general relativity.  This year, NASA has set up many sites within the path of the eclipse to monitor, measure and capture data to further their knowledge.  There is much to be learned from studying these phenomena.

As we have seen throughout history, the science of astronomy can be used to predict and measure certain events and occurrences with regularity.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there could be more certainty in predicting the ups and downs of the stock market?  One study found that stocks around the world rise on sunnier days!  However, no one can predict the future.  We need to focus on what we can control, including an appropriate asset allocation, diversification and keeping costs low.  That is why actively managed funds underperform the benchmarks and why even the geniuses like Warren Buffet recommend using passive index funds.  At DWM, we think you should stick with your investing plan and not look for the latest fads or trends or even astronomical events to impact your strategy.

We hope that NASA and other scientists learn some spectacular new things from this years’ eclipse.  Here in Charleston, we will be avid, yet passive spectators to the historical occurrence and will use our ISO certified eclipse glasses to watch the once-in-a-lifetime event unfold.   Happy eclipse watching!

Happy Holidays – Lessons from Star Wars

Grandsons Matthew and Henry and I went to the see “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” yesterday.  With Carrie Fisher (Princess Leia) having passed away in the morning, it was a surreal experience.  Even so, we all loved it.  This is the eighth Star Wars film, all of which have been commercial blockbusters, amassing combined box office earnings of $7 billion.  But did you know that the Star Wars films have also provided some great financial lessons as well? With thanks to wealthmanagement.com for the idea, here are some of the key ones:

There is tremendous power in holistic planning.  Young Luke Skywalker’s advisor Obi Wan Kenobi (“OWK”) taught him that the Force, an energy field created by all living things that binds the galaxy together, is the source of his power. In the same way, a well-developed holistic financial plan can give you tremendous power to meet your goals.  Of course, once implemented, the plan needs regular monitoring and modifications as conditions and goals change.

Stick to the Plan.  Do you remember when Luke was just a neophyte, learning the ways of the Force,  and the skeptical Han Solo, disregarding the advisors like OWK pushed Luke to be a risk-taker, like him?  After Luke got distracted by Solo’s taunts, OWK reminded him to trust his plan instead of making knee-jerk reactions.  While things got rocky along the way, Luke eventually reached his goal- to become a Jedi Knight.  It’s an important lesson.  You need to stick to your plan, particularly with investments.  Trust in your plan and your allocations and focus on long-term goals.

Quick and Easy Leads to the Dark Side. In the 1980s, the Jedi Master Yoda taught Luke about the Dark Side.  Yoda told Luke that chasing instant gratification, like investing heavily in a hot stock, can lead to ruin.   When Luke ignores the advice, he’s almost defeated by Darth Vader.  Yoda reminds us that patience is a key in investing.  At DWM, we firmly believe that you should adopt an appropriate, diversified asset allocation and stay fully invested.  Don’t try to time the markets or chase performance. Stay disciplined.

Value is the key.  Despite his other issues, Han Solo does understand value.  Luke was shocked when Solo initially disclosed his fees to pilot them across the galaxy in the Millennium Falcon.  Luke said he could buy and pilot his own starship for less, but OWK knew expertise can command a fair price and even offered to spend more to ensure results.   Yes, value is the key.  Expertise and honesty command a fair price and offer the best possibilities of helping you get to your lifetime destinations.

Family is everything. In “Star Wars VII: The Force Awakens,” Solo played the role of advisor to next generation heroes Rey and Finn, but was unable to guide his own son Ben. As a result, Ben disregarded Luke Skywalker’s teachings and sought out the advice of Snoke and converted to the dark side, as the evil Kylo Ren. At DWM, our focus is on families.  We do our best to meet, understand and communicate with everyone, sometimes three or four generations, and, as part of our total wealth management service, provide financial assistance to all family members, regardless of the size of their current investment portfolio.

Use a Fiduciary. Along with Yoda’s warning about the quick, easy and seductive dark side, the heroes of Star Wars are frequently working not just for themselves, but in the best interest of the galaxy. General Leia (no longer a princess) formed the Resistance when the First Order rose to power in the ashes of the Empire. The evil First Order did not support plans made in the best interests of the galaxy.  Finn abandoned the First Order after he was asked to attack innocent villagers and used his knowledge to aid the resistance.  Unfortunately, there are many providers in the financial service industry that are part of the quick, easy and seductive dark side.  Align yourself with advisers who are fiduciaries, legally bound to put your interests first, and who are passionate about adding value and helping you reach your goals.

 May the Force Be With You Always!