Financial Literacy: Money Matters!

As you all know, we provide proactive financial advice on matters such as investment management and value-added services such as tax planning, risk management and estate planning to name a few.  Something you probably didn’t know is that earlier this year, we launched a campaign to promote financial literacy for children and young adults!  It is called the Young Investors program.  Some of our clients have recently become the first recipients of this new program!

Financial literacy is a person’s ability to recognize and use the money and other resources he or she has to get what is needed and wanted.  Another way of saying this is that financial literacy is being able to set goals for using financial resources, make plans, and use the plans to meet financial demands and achieve goals.  To achieve financial literacy, a person needs to have experiences with money.  That is why it is important that children begin to learn about money and its use when they are young.

You might not know this, but financial literacy availability for young children is scarce, primarily because the school systems lack time and budget resources to incorporate financial education into the curriculums.  In fact, only 16 states require any instruction in economics between Kindergarten and 12th grade.  Even worse, only 7 states require students to take courses in personal finance.

There’s been a greater awareness of this educational need in the past 10 years and some financial-literacy advocacy groups have begun to take some steps to fill this educational void.  Some have responded by offering summer camps to young children whose parents want to teach their children the basics of money management.  Feedback from many of the attendees is that, believe it or not, they had fun!  Of course, we want to join in on the fun, and we are also excited to be a part of the solution.

We know that a financial foundation is best achieved when started early, reviewed, as well as reinforced often.  It’s important to teach young children even before they are in school about the concept of money, and that it’s not all about spending!  For example, something simple that a parent can start as early as age 3 can have lasting effects for the future.  Consider this:

Activity: Tell your toddler that you’ll give him a cookie now if he wants it, but you’ll give him two cookies if he waits an extra ten minutes. See what he chooses and try to encourage him to wait for the extra cookie.

Lesson Learned: Be patient and wait for a bigger payoff, rather than always going for instant gratification.

Although it might not look like much, it sets the stage for a less impulsive, more thoughtful response, and hopefully not just one involving money in the future!

Thinking about the scenario above, in an article I read the other day from the Wall Street Journal on personal finance summer camps, a 12 year old boy cited some camp attendance takeaways such as stopping and pausing before making purchases and long term planning!  I suppose it’s true that small things do matter!  And more interesting feedback from the camp directors is that many children ages 10-14 didn’t know what stock and bonds were.  Some thought the investments were a form of real estate.  Clearly, more attention needs to be given to this area.

We love the opportunities these summer camps offer and hope to provide some of our own financial education to our client families year round.  With our financial literacy agenda, our Young Investor program is structured with several tiers of age appropriate interactions and dialogue starters on financial matters for our clients to have with their children or grandchildren.  Age appropriate financial suggestions, tools, links to pertinent financial articles and fun activities to engage their minds are some of the content we will be sharing.  With the importance of starting as early as possible, we literally start at the very beginning, with newly born children/grandchildren, and capture all ages through the early 20s.  Specifically, we break out the tiers in roughly 5 year intervals, so age 0-5 years is the first group, 5-10 years is next, then 10-15 years, with 15-20ish years being the last group.  Our goal is that by age 25, the child or grandchild will be more than ready to begin a lifetime of investing!

Even after your children and grandchildren start their careers, it is our hope that they will join our Emerging Investor program, where they can establish their own brokerage accounts with Charles Schwab and have some of the same great DWM advantages and services as their parents and grandparents.  We are happy to help them by protecting and growing a diversified portfolio to preserve assets and provide moderate growth with minimal risk.

With our help, the young children of today will come to ask for financial assistance and have some of the best mentors in their lives, YOU!  And we all know that money is not an elective in life, so let’s keep the dialogue going with our young generation and keep providing them with good ‘sense’!  We hope you find this program to be a valuable experience.  As always, please let us know your thoughts or if you need financial assistance with a young investor in your life.

Emptying the Nest

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It is an exciting time of year when smiling faces in caps and gowns are seen everywhere! Recently having the pleasure to witness my son’s graduation, the President of the University of South Carolina made sure that the graduates took the time to thank their parents for helping them get to this important occasion. Absolutely! So, congratulations, parents! Turning 21 or graduating from college are exciting milestones and your kids have now reached what we all consider to be the beginning of “adulthood” as they get ready to enter the “real” world. Kids grow up in all different ways and in all different stages – is your young adult ready for launch?

At DWM, we like to offer proactive financial advice for all members of our clients’ families. As your young adult is readying to depart the nest, however that looks, we think this is a good opportunity to provide some education, as they take the reins of their own financial future. Many college-aged kids have had a student checking account and understand how to use their debit card pretty well by now! They probably have some experience with having a job and budgeting for things they want to buy in the short term. However, some of the more complex financial topics can be intimidating for young adults, While they may have a solid background in finance, it is always good to review concepts like compound interest, building good credit, taxes, buying insurance and understanding 401(k)s, for once they land that first “real” job! We might suggest that a good place to start is by getting a copy of The Wall Street Journal. Guide to Starting Your Financial Life by Karen Blumenthal (https://www.amazon.com/Street-Journal-Guide-Starting-Financial/dp/030740708X ). This book covers issues about renting or buying your first home, basic investing, taxes, purchasing health insurance, buying a car, establishing good credit and saving for retirement, among other topics. Might make a perfect college graduation or 21st birthday gift!

In addition, this is a good time to help them make sure all of their accounts are properly set up, titled appropriately and that they have a savings program in place. Reaching the age of majority, which is age 21 for both Illinois and South Carolina, is a good time to change any custodial accounts like a UTMA and UGMA to individual accounts. It may also be helpful to talk about debt, perhaps review student loans and consider opening a credit card account to establish some credit history. Using debt wisely, having a good emergency fund and responsible budgeting are all really valuable conversations and will help your young adult navigate their new financial map.

Encouraging saving and investing is a fundamental lesson and the “pay yourself first” concept is an important one. Remind them that they are paying their future self and that, just like the rewards for eating right, exercising and wearing sunscreen, saving and investing will benefit the health of their future self (as well as their current self!).

One idea that might help is having an automatic savings app like the one found in The College Investor article https://thecollegeinvestor.com/17610/top-automatic-savings-apps/. Also from The College Investor, you can find numerous financial and investing podcasts available that your young adult may take interest in. Here’s the link to get started: https://thecollegeinvestor.com/6778/top-investing-podcasts/. Or maybe they would want a subscription that focuses on the economy, like The Economist or Wall Street Journal.

If working and the business offers it, they should always make sure to contribute to their 401(k) to get the most advantage of any company match. And, if they don’t already have one, starting a Roth account is another great investment savings vehicle, especially while their starting incomes and lower tax brackets will allow them the opportunity to make annual contributions. Up to $5,500 of their earned income can be directly contributed to a Roth account and the compounded gains will never be taxed. Your young adult can set up automatic transfers to investment accounts or savings vehicles so they get used to not seeing those funds in their everyday account, just like 401(k) contributions. It is a great way to plant the seeds for a successful future!

Once the young adult has gotten some traction and they have good financial habits in motion, encourage them to contact us and check out the Emerging Investors program at DWM http://www.dwmgmt.com/investors/. You can learn even more about the EI program by clicking on this link and accessing one of our recent blogs written by Jake Rickord http://dwmgmt.com/archives-blog/index.php/2017/11/. Our Emerging Investors program offers a specialized financial planning model with DWM investment strategies that uses the automated Schwab IIP platform. Our goal is to help them graduate to full DWM Total Wealth Management clients down the road. The best way to reach the level of a TWM client is not just by higher earning, but by stronger and earlier investing. We love to educate and help others plan for their financial future. We are always available if you or your young adult have any questions and would certainly welcome feedback.   Please let us know how we can be of assistance!

 

The Money Talk

It’s no secret that today’s standard high school and college curriculums are missing a few very important details. One of the most overlooked areas is basic financial education. Discussing finances with your children can be a difficult topic to broach, but it is critical to their success in the long run.

One common misconception of having “the money talk” is the idea that kids must be sheltered from financial issues. In some instances this is absolutely true, but having a basic discussion about finances and instilling good values in your children is important. “The money talk” shouldn’t be seen as taboo, but rather as an opportunity to guide your kids and help them navigate potentially tricky financial issues and decisions that arise.

Here are some tips to help as you approach “the money talk.”

 

1.Be honest.

 

Chances are that at some point in your life, you’ve experienced highs and lows in your finances. No need to hide it! These experiences provide a learning opportunity for your kids and allow you to be open and frank about the reality of financial decisions—they can handle it.

If you ran up debts in your past and had difficulty paying these back, this serves as an excellent teaching moment. Learning from those you respect can be just as effective as learning the lesson on your own.

Also, this may go without saying, but be careful not to spread falsehoods about your current financial situation. Remember, your kids can handle it and will almost always know when you’re not being completely honest with them.

 

2. Talk in values, not figures.

 

If you’re hesitant to share your financial situation with your children, that is normal. You are certainly not alone on this, but it doesn’t have to be scary. The good news is your kids don’t always want to know (or need to know) every detail of your financial life. Don’t sweat the small stuff—instead, focus on teaching them the basics. Ask yourself, what do they need to know, and what is often missed in standard education? Children should have a solid understanding of concepts such as saving, budgeting, paying down debt, developing healthy spending habits, and compounding interest.

 

3. Use real-world experiences.

 

Life is full of sporadic but important financial lessons that can be found in everyday experiences. It’s up to you to look for these opportunities and expand on them with your children.

If you’re going to the bank, you may consider taking your children with you. This is a great time to demonstrate how transactions work and, if applicable, how an ATM works. To take it a step further, you may even begin the discussion on how money can generate interest.

When your children start their first jobs and start receiving paychecks, this is a convenient time to discuss the importance of budgeting, paying bills, and taxes. Talk through what their goals are for each paycheck and how much they may need to save in order to accomplish these goals.

If you are planning a family trip, consider letting them in on the budgeting. Showing them your budget, planning activities you want to accomplish with this budget, and building a trip around this information will help make financial planning seem tangible to them. This may also be a good time to remind your kids that goals often require sacrifice, and not every trip activity will be accomplished.

Try giving your kids an allowance and taking them to the grocery store. The grocery store can be a clear example of “needs” vs. “wants.” Your children need nutrients but most certainly would like to have a few candies as well. However, with a set allowance, they won’t be able to afford them all!

In closing, whether you realize it or not, you play an important role in your children’s financial future. In their early years, they rely heavily on you for financial advice to help them form healthy financial habits (and the occasional $20 bill for the movies). At DWM, we feel it is essential to educate your children about finances early on, so they can be better prepared for the future. That’s why we created our new Emerging Investor program to help younger folks invest early on and get started on the path to financial freedom! To learn more about this exciting new program, check out the full description here: http://dwmgmt.com/blogs/123-2017-11-29-20-49-47.html.

Our Children Are Our Future

This Holy Week in the Christian world is an excellent time to put last Saturday’s “March for Our Lives” in perspective. While millions of Americans found the marches for gun control inspiring, many others were skeptical wondering “What do these kids know?” Older people have been groaning about the young in politics for centuries. Yet, in the late 19th century, during a very dark political time for the U.S., the young people helped save democracy. Can they do it again?

Young people have always been involved in American politics, primarily as unpaid labor doing work behind the scenes; making posters, handing out campaign information, running errands and other unglamorous jobs. The young were never allowed to champion themselves or their opinions, being told by established politicians to simply follow the party’s platform.

At the end of the 19th century, according to John Grinspan, Smithsonian historian and author, young people cried out to be heard on their issues. A new generation of young people denounced current leaders and partisanship. They demanded reforms. In 1898, one New Yorker summarized their movement as “the younger generation hates both parties equally.”

At the start of the 20th century, the youth movement put an end to extreme polarization; forcing both parties to pursue its issues and concerns. Independent young voters became a decisive third force, with enough clout to swing close elections. Politicians supported them and their agenda, creating the Progressive Era, which included cleaning up cities and passing laws protecting workers. Though unable to personally vote, women played a key role. Women worked to refocus American life toward social issues, built schools and fought child labor.

Mr. Grinspan argues that the key to understanding youth politics is that young people can’t “focus simply on benefits for the young.” Youth is temporary and gains are passed on. The high school seniors who marched Saturday across the country will hopefully make their schools safer well after they have graduated. Mr. Grinspan concludes that the young should set the nation’s political agenda as they will be here much longer than the rest of us.

Today’s young have much work to do. The solutions the marchers want certainly depend on winning elections. Ultimately, it’s not about standing up to be heard, but about accomplishing political change. These kids didn’t spontaneously emerge from Florida a month ago. They and millions like them were born after 9/11. They have grown up with the worry of guns in their classrooms and the threat of terrorism for their entire lifetime. Many have perceived that our grown-up generations have been stripping our nation’s resources, allowed or assisted in the destruction of the middle class, added trillions of dollars of debt to our nation’s finances and have allowed politics to sink into tribalism. They’ve been watching us and our mistakes and they’ve decided it’s not for them. We all have much to learn from these children and their perspective and they deserve our support.

In honor of Holy Week, it seems a very appropriate time to read Matthew 19:13-14 (from the new living translation): “Then the little children were brought to Jesus for Him to place His hands on them and pray for them; and the disciples rebuked those who brought them. But Jesus said, ‘Let the children come to me. Don’t stop them! For the Kingdom of Heaven belongs to those who are like these children.’”

DWM wishes you and your family a wonderful Easter weekend!!

DWM SAYS THANKS – LAST WEEKEND AT THE SWEETGRASS PAVILLION

This past Saturday, many clients/family/friends attended our annual Charleston Friends of DWM Appreciation Event at Sweetgrass Pavillion in Mt. Pleasant, SC. Although the sun evaded us, the room was filled with bright faces!

A great time was had by all!

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Marilyn Dingle, the resident sweetgrass basket weaver, educated us on the history of sweetgrass baskets.

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And some even participated!

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Everyone learned a thing or two about Marilyn and the art of sweetgrass basket weaving!

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And had lots to talk about!

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Many thanks to all who waded through the rain and joined us for our appreciation event! And to both those that did attend and to those that couldn’t make it, let us reiterate that we are honored to have you all as our friends and look forward to a continued great relationship! Thank you!!!

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DWM SAYS THANKS – LAST WEEKEND AT ARLINGTON PARK!

This past Saturday, many clients/family/friends attended our annual Chicagoland Friends of DWM Appreciation Event at Arlington Park Race Track in Arlington Heights, IL. We were blessed with a warm, sunny day under the shade of one of Arlington Park Race Track’s marquee tents!

A great time was had by all!

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Don the Handicapper educated us aka “Arlington Park Betting 101”.

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And we had some lucky winners!

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Then again not all of us were old enough to bet, but still had fun!

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Some just wanted to chill…in a tree!

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Some of us – both young and old – even had a roll down the hill match! (Thanks for organizing, L.M.)

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For those that attended, thank you very much for coming and partaking in what was a truly special day for our Detterbeck Wealth Management team. And to both those that did attend and to those that couldn’t make it, let us reiterate that we are honored to have you all as our friends and look forward to a continued great relationship! Thank you!!!

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Lastly, for those in Charleston area, we look forward to hopefully seeing you at our October appreciation event!

Father of the American Christmas Card

It’s that time of year again. Time to get together with family, reconnect with old friends and drink eggnog by the fire. Spending time with those important people in your life is nice any time of the year, but it’s always great around the holidays. However, what is one to do about all those wonderful people if you do not get to see them in person? Enter the Christmas card. Christmas cards have become a staple in most households during the holidays and there is a long history behind their success and popularity.
Have you ever wondered how the Christmas card came to be what it is today? Initially produced in 1843 by Sir Henry Cole of Britain as a way to keep in touch with all of his friends and acquaintances, it wasn’t until 20 years later that they became mass produced in the United States by Louis Prang of Boston, MA. Sir Henry Cole’s original card included images of him feeding and clothing the poor with the words “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year” on both sides. He had the same heading of “TO ____,” with the blank spot allowing him to print a different name on each card. Back in the States, the popularity of Louis Prang’s take on the Christmas card grew. Soon people began to collect these and measure how many they received each year. It is for this reason that Louis Prang is considered by many as the “Father of the American Christmas card.”

Christmas cards have indeed grown since their creation in the 1800’s. With 1.6 billion Christmas cards purchased every year, according to the Greeting Card Association, the industry for Christmas cards seems like it may last the test of time. That is, if we don’t all switch over to electronic, emailed cards. However, the ease of electronic greeting cards does not appear to be having a large effect either, as this year Americans will spend on average $30 on Christmas cards, according to a study done by Statista.com. The amount that Americans spend on Christmas cards each year does not even take into account the time and effort that goes into developing the card, and, in some cases, getting the family to stand still long enough to have a picture for your card. However, all the time, effort and money that you put into giving Christmas cards to friends and family is a small price to pay for letting your loved ones know you’re thinking of them during the holiday season.

At DWM we value the importance of family and friends, and we agree that maintaining close relationships is priceless. Connecting with those important people in your life is nice around the holidays, and it’s especially important to us at DWM now and throughout the year. We appreciate keeping in touch with all of you and we wish you a Merry Christmas, a wonderful holiday season, and a happy new year!

Teach Your Children Well

As parents, we want what is best for our kids and want to prepare them to be independent and successful adults.  Two of my three children are in college now and, from my experience both as a parent and working at DWM, I have learned there are some gaps in the financial education and understanding of money in our young people, including my kids.  Money isn’t everything and certainly should be kept in perspective related to other pursuits in life.  That would be my first tip for the young adults in my life.  However, money is a means to an end and it is important for them to understand their own unique balance sheet and learn strategies to successfully manage all the variables that will affect their financial future.

1. Protect and Grow your Most Valuable Asset – YOU!

One of the most important things for college-age or young working adults to realize is that by far their most valuable asset is themselves!  For a young adult, the ability to generate income for the next 40 or so years is their most phenomenal asset.  Understanding the value of this asset can encourage them to look for ways to magnify that potential earning power and minimize the risks to it. Will additional education improve that income potential?  It is also smart for young people to realize that the future is uncertain.   We need to teach them to prepare for any risks, like economic downturns, that may reduce asset growth or increase their liabilities.  This can help them recognize that using resources to maintain adequate disability or life insurance can be as important as insuring your car or home.  Creating good habits in saving, tax-planning and budgeting are important to protect against unanticipated variables.

2. Diversify your Assets

When evaluating net worth, most people tend to think of some of the obvious current assets that you might include – a house or a car, for example.  Looking more deeply, though, will show some differences in those assets.  This is another area where younger people may need some education.  A car’s value, for example, should be considered against the taxes, maintenance, gas and depreciation that essentially makes it worth much less over time.  Same with a boat.  Real estate is usually considered a good asset to offer diversification, if it is appreciating at or above inflation.   An interesting article from the Wall Street Journal notes that as wealth increases, the percentage of net worth represented by a principal residence declines.  Young adults should understand that diversification is an important strategy and having a good mix of assets will make you financially stronger, especially over the long-term.

3. Spend Wisely

In general, a personal balance sheet should include the value of everything you have and everything you owe, even if some of those are intangible.  When you put the potential value of a career’s worth of income in real dollars in one column against the future costs of loans or other debts, it makes the impact more visible.   This strategy can help spotlight the real costs for student loans, houses, cars, trips, credit cards or luxury purchases.  An Investment News article recently quoted a study that found more than half of college bound students had failed to estimate their student loan costs adequately and regretted the decision to take out those loans, once their repayment programs had begun.  Certainly, when evaluating the merits of an educational program or even a business investment, it would be smart to consider potential income benefits against the costs for that investment.  Weighing the purchase of a new flat screen TV or expensive pair of shoes against the value of income needed to finance that goal might make anyone think twice!

4. Save and Invest Early

Finally, it is significant for young people to know that they can really maximize the potential on their balance sheet by saving and investing as early and as fully as possible.  Learning the value of compounding in real terms can be a wonderful eye-opener and understanding the effect of inflation on a dollar over time can be equally enlightening.  Not all saving is created equal.  A penny saved is worth more than a penny earned, when you factor in taxes and compound interest!  It is important to maximize retirement investments and practice the “pay yourself first” philosophy of saving and investing to create a good financial plan.

Also, young workers should be encouraged to immediately sign up for employer retirement plans, like 401(k)’s, and to maximize their contributions to take advantage of any match programs offered by their employer.  If their job doesn’t offer one, opening an IRA or Roth IRA might be a good solution.  Starting a Roth at a young age allows the investor to take advantage of making after-tax contributions while in a lower tax bracket and creating an account that can grow and offer tax free funds for use later in life.  As an example, a 25 year old who makes the maximum allowable annual contribution of $5,500 annually to an investment vehicle that averages a 5% return could have around $700,000 by the time they are ready to retire.

The biggest lesson that our kids and other young adults should be taught is that the most important key for success in wealth management, as in most things, is discipline.  We love to educate our clients and their families.  Please let us know if we can help teach your kids good financial habits.

What Will Be Your Legacy?

Family fourth of JulyMoney or family values? Hopefully, both.

A 2012 study by Allianz found that 86% of baby boomers and their parents agreed that family stories and values were more important life legacies than financial assets. This echoed findings in 2005 when a similar study was conducted and 77% felt that memories, stories, life lessons, family traditions and values were 10 times more important than money.

We’re seeing more multi-generational planning in our business these days. Our clients are families and in some cases include three generations; grandparents, parents and children. Multi-generational planning has become an extremely important and growing part of our business.

There are a number of reasons:

  1. People are living longer. The older generations are more actively involved with the younger generations and the younger generations may become caregivers for the older generation for a longer time.
  2. There is more communication in the family. We’re not seeing the traditional patriarchal model as often these days. Males and females of all generations have a voice in family matters and with the internet and social media there’s lots of communication.
  3. Families seem to have more assets than the past. The Great Generation and Silent Generation have made a substantial amount of money and not spent it. Despite the Financial Crisis of 2008 and the current slow economic recovery, America has been a wonderful place to live and make money for decades.
  4. Minimizing estate taxes is no longer the primary objective of family wealth management. Back in 2001, the lifetime exemption for federal estate tax purposes was only $675,000 per person. Today it is $5,250,000. Hence, if planned properly, a couple could transfer $10,500,000 or more to beneficiaries without estate taxes. Furthermore, many states no longer have estate or inheritances taxes or have high thresholds before such taxes start. Hence, taxes still need consideration, but they are not necessarily the focal point of planning.

Today, some families create 100 year family plans. They believe that the assets of the family are the human capital of its individual members. They communicate their family history and culture and pass it down through generations. They discuss shared values and develop family mission statements. They focus on each family member’s individual pursuit of happiness. Some families hold regular meetings and make a major commitment toward financial education. Many share philanthropic initiatives. Alan Alda said it well, “I’ve come to believe that giving feels good, but I think giving strategically feels terrific.”

Of course, successful families also consider their wealth objectives and dealing with strategic issues or risks that may stand in the way. They discuss preparation for major life events such as birth, death, divorce, marriage, illness, sale of a business, etc. Communication of intentions is critical in these areas. Research shows that wealth transfer is best accomplished when heirs are aware, informed and prepared. Lack of information can lead to misunderstandings about intentions and values. Some of our families are mentoring beneficiaries, and, of course, paying special attention to the long-term selection of trustees and advisors.

We now see three steps of planning: 1) Financial planning is often described as preparing, planning, protecting and growing your assets during your lifetime. 2) Estate planning prepares your assets for your family. 3) Multi-generational planning prepares your family to receive their inheritance in both money and family values.

Regardless of your age, if you would like to talk about multi-generational planning, please give us a call. We’d like to talk with you and we’re passionate about helping families to create and pass along legacies- of all types.