Your New DWM Website

A few months before starting my career at DWM, the team decided it was time to change the look of the company. The first step was revamping the logo to have a more modern feel, while still maintaining a strong message. The DWM gears were a perfect fit. The origin of the gears symbolizes the idea of process, which is ideal when you consider DWM’s philosophy: “Wealth management is a process, not a product.”

While the new logo certainly achieved a modern feel, we also needed to update the look of our website. We came together as a team to determine what the old site lacked, and how the new site would improve the overall user experience. I started building out the new site my second week at DWM. Every week the team discussed ways to make it better for clients, prospects, and anyone else who wanted to stop by. Now, almost 8 months later, the new and improved DWM site is finalized and ready for you to visit.

The new site benefits both DWM clients and non-clients in three main ways: simplicity, quick/convenient access, and transparency.

Simplicity. The new site has a very simple layout. We do not try to impress anyone with fancy terminology or complicated charts that may be difficult to understand. The goal is for you, the viewer, to have a stress free experience on our site and easily obtain the information you are looking for. From our home page, one can easily navigate to brochure-like items such as our DWM Total Wealth Management Process (investment management, value-added services, and relationship management), DWM processes and culture, the DWM team, and a link to recent blogs.  Within each tab, we give a brief overview of our philosophy on that particular subject, but do not ramble on for 10+ pages. As much as we love talking about all aspects of wealth management, we recognize you probably did not come to the site to read an entire book. So while the information is detailed, it is still easy to understand and not overwhelming.

Quick/convenient access for clients. Typically, clients visit the DWM website to access either their MGP financial plan, DWM/Orion account (performance) information, or Schwab account information. With that in mind, we did not want you to have to scavenge the site just to access your information. For this reason, we inserted quick links in the header of the site so you can quickly locate your information from any page. To go along with quick access, we made a point to maximize convenience, so, we decided all log in screens should open in a separate tab. This way, if you are reading a blog about market performance and decide to check your account, you will not be navigated away from the site. A new tab will open and you can finish reading after checking your account. Of course, everything is still 100% secure, as DWM takes your personal and account information very seriously.

Transparency. When I first started building out the new site, I was surprised to hear a general rule of thumb is to limit the amount of pictures of the company’s employees. If you visit other sites in the financial industry, you may notice there are a lot of canned pictures of happy couples running on the beach, sunsets, and whatever else distracts you from the idea wealth management is a process that takes a strong team you can trust. So while we are certainly happy at DWM, it is not because we are running along the beach everyday with our hands in the air, but because we enjoy helping you achieve and enjoy your financial freedom.

To go along with transparency, we spent a significant amount of time on the “DWM Team” section of the site. We decided we did not want to only brag about everything we have accomplished and why we are qualified to be your personal fiduciaries, but rather, give you a better idea of who we are as people. Of course, we give background information, but more importantly explain how we got into wealth management, some passions outside of wealth management, our family, interests, and experiences at DWM thus far. This gives the reader the ability to learn more about the individuals on this team and how they mesh with your needs.

We are very excited about the new DWM website and our overall online presence. To go along with the new website, we also have updated our Linkedin, Facebook, and Twitter Pages. We are using Twitter to help everyday folks with wealth management by posting blogs and “daily wealth management tips.” Our goal is to help as many people as possible achieve financial freedom and we are thrilled we can utilize social media to do that. So please, check out the new and improved DWM online platforms! Here are the links:

DWM website: http://www.dwmgmt.com/

DWM LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/detterbeck-wealth-management

DWM Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DetterbeckWealthManagement/

DWM Twitter: https://twitter.com/detterbeckwm

When You Pass On, Don’t Leave the Passwords Behind

Digital assets and passwords - RIPIsn’t it fun keeping track of all the different user names and passwords required in a digital world?  I updated my own list a week ago and I had 52 of them, 3 with Apple alone.  If you think it is tough getting into some websites now, can you imagine what happens when someone dies and their digital information needs to be accessed?  It can be a mess.  Leonard Bernstein died in 1990. His password protected memoir Blue Ink has not been broken into yet.

Online accounts have expanded exponentially.  Digital accounts and property may greatly exceed an individual’s paper records and lists of those records.  We are now at the beginning stages of how to include digital assets in estate planning.

On April 19th, Robert W. “Bobby” Pearce, Jr. of Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP presented “Digital Estate Planning” to the Estate Planning Council of Charleston.  My take away from his excellent presentation is that with the explosion of digital assets, all of us must rethink our estate planning.  Who owns the digital assets? Who can access the assets? In short, Bobby suggested that currently, the “rights of representatives, executors, beneficiaries and others are as clear as mud.”

Digital assets are any online property you own including any file, email, documents, photos, videos and images stored on digital devices including desktops, laptops, tablets, smart phones and other storage devices.  Digital accounts are email accounts, software licenses, bank accounts, social networking accounts, domain names, professional accounts, personal accounts and other online accounts.

Mr. Pearce indicated that the current legal status of online property records is largely dealt with by each online website’s Terms of Service (“TOS”). And TOS’ differ greatly.   For example, for yahoo, the account is nontransferable and will be deleted after 90 days.  Google requires a cumbersome process to obtain access to an account. Ultimately, court orders may be needed in both situations.  Only one state, Oklahoma has passed legislation dealing with digital property.  The question is, does the statute trump the TOS contract?  And what happens in the other 49 states?

There are other issues.  What is the value of your digital property?  Domain names and copyrighted work online may have commercial value.  And what about the personal and emotional value of photos and videos on Flickr, You Tube and other sites?  Who should be in charge of your online accounts, user names and passwords when you die?  What will be your instructions to the person?

At a minimum, you should get the following done now:

  1. Inventory your digital assets of all types and locations
  2. Identify the person to handle them
  3. Provide a list of accounts, user names, passwords, PINs and answers to security questions
  4. Instruct your designated person with how you want these to be managed
  5. Provide authority through a digital asset POA or other means

In short, it’s time to put your digital asset affairs in order.