DWM 2015 Year-end Market Commentary

Uncertainty imageIf you had to summarize the markets in 2015 with one word, it would be “uncertainty”. Much of the reason for the poor performance of stocks, fixed income, and alternatives can be chalked up to uncertainty…uncertainty of what the Fed was going to do with interest rates, uncertainty to when oil supply and demand will come into balance, and uncertainty surrounding China’s economy. In last quarter’s market commentary, we wrote about having just finished an awful August/September stock market drubbing, only to see equity benchmarks almost fully recover in October. Unfortunately, the good vibes didn’t last long as another sell-off commenced in December after the Fed raised interest rates for the first time in over nine years. The end result: 2015 going down as the first losing year since 2008 for many investors.

Here’s how the major asset classes fared in 2015:

Equities: The MSCI AC World Equity Index registered -2.4%. Emerging markets really took it on the chin, losing 14.9%, as represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index as falling commodity prices and the strengthening US dollar hurt these countries’ economies. On paper, the big cap US market benchmarks appeared to do better with the S&P500 only down 0.7% before reinvested dividends, but that is skewed by the outperformance of some of the largest capitalized names like Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, and Alphabet (formerly Google). Remove those names and the S&P500 would have similar figures to the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index (-4.4%) or the Russell Mid Cap (-2.4%).

Fixed Income: Fixed income investors aren’t jumping for joy at this year’s end. The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index was up just a tiny bit, +0.6%; but the Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index declined 3.2%. It was worse off in the high yield aka “junk” market which finished the year -4.5%. This index was weighed down by energy companies where long term solvency has come into question given these extremely low oil prices.

Alternatives: In theory, asset allocation using a diversified approach helps investors over the long run. This was a very untypical year in that the three major asset classes (equities, fixed income, and alternatives) finished the year with very similar small negative results, with the Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Index down -1.0% for the year. We wouldn’t expect that trend to continue for 2016. For more detailed info on alternatives, please see our blog from last month at http://www.dwmgmt.com/why-alts/ .

At the time of this writing, the stock market is not off to a good start in 2016, with the Dow tumbling more than 1000 points in the first week, as the uncertainty of the Fed, China, and oil continues. But let’s chat about those three items.

  1. The Fed and interest rates: The Fed has indicated that it wants to keep raising, but at a very gradual rate. The last thing they want to do is harm the economy or US or global growth. In fact, Fed officials expect that rates will still be below 3.5% in late 2018. So this is not the same thing as slamming down on the brakes when going 80mph.
  2. China’s slow-down: This is not a one-time 2015/2016 event. China is undergoing a necessary and positive adjustment, shifting from an economy based on heavy manufacturing towards one based on service. This will take years to convert so investors should simply expect these type of headlines and not fear them.
  3. Oil prices: Consumers are loving these lower prices at the gas pump, but it’s creating havoc in the global markets. There’s a disequilibrium: demand is up, but supply is up more, way more! Many energy companies are suffering. Imagine if your paycheck got cut in half or more. It’s very hard to live on severely reduced income. You still have the same fixed costs. So what do you do? You can borrow money and hope for prices to recover, but they may not and you may go bankrupt. This ballgame is only in the middle innings and could get uglier. Fortunately, for the US consumer, these lower oil prices means extra money in our pocket which most likely leads to spending and boosting our economy even more.

2016 isn’t another 2008 in the making. Major market declines typically occur when the economy is heading south. That’s not the case as the US economy is one of the world’s healthiest right now: there’s strong job growth, solid inflation-adjusted wage growth, and cheap gas prices. For diversified investors, there are opportunities in areas where selling has been overdone and market cycles start to reverse. It’s been a rough start in 2016, but a long-term investor remembers to stay the course, be disciplined, and be rewarded in the end.

Uncertainty is the one thing that is certain about financial markets.  Expect it, but don’t fear it.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT