The Underwater Beach Ball Effect

beach ball underwaterRemember as a kid holding a beach ball underwater, then letting it go? It’s fun. It’s also quite unpredictable as it returns to equilibrium.

The Federal Reserve is now facing the same task with long-term interest rates. Rates have been artificially submerged since the financial crisis in 2008. Can the Fed curtail their unprecedented monetary stimulus program without major fallouts to the economy and the financial markets?

On May 22nd, Chairman Bernanke told a congressional panel that he did not foresee an immediate reduction to easy money. However, hours later, the minutes from the last Fed meeting were released. These showed a growing number of governors want to start to “taper off” as early as next month. The markets have been rattled since then. The concern is: can the Fed “taper” off the quantitative easing without damage? It would be quite a balancing act. And, we, of course, are in uncharted waters.

Things had been going swimmingly since last September. The Fed has been buying $85 billion in bonds every month, lowering the long-term interest rates and boosting economic growth. The strategy appears to be working. The economy is growing, unemployment is shrinking, the housing market is recovering and the stock market has been soaring. The Fed had promised to keep the program going until there was a “substantial improvement” in the job market. We’re getting close. However, the markets have been spooked for the last seven trading days.

On Friday, U.S. Treasuries posted their biggest losses in more than two years, pushing yields to twelve month highs. The 30-year mortgage rate rose to 3.81% nationwide. Fixed income investments of all types declined in value, particularly currencies and emerging markets.

The S&P 500 has been down over 2% since May 22 and other equity subclasses, such as international, small cap and emerging markets are down even more. Many of the liquid alternative holdings have been flat, however, global real estate is down significantly, and gold is up in the last seven trading days. It’s one of those short periods of time when almost every investment is down.

The good news is that the economy has in fact recovered sufficiently that the Fed is considering tapering off easy money. That’s great. However, at this stage, we have no idea of the timing or the results of tapering. Bond interest and stock prices are connected, though not in a simple way. If bond interest rates rise too rapidly or too high, they will raise the cost of credit for companies and stock prices will be hurt. However, if interest rates are able to return to, let’s say, 5% or 6% that might have little impact on stocks.

focus

So what’s an investor to do? Should you do something or nothing? During periods of stress and volatility we suggest you focus on what you can control and learn to roll with what is out of your control. For example, none of us can control what the Fed does, what the major media report as front page news, interest rates or market actions. What we can control is our long – term investing plan, our asset allocation and the wealth manager we use.

It’s especially important at these times to review your long-term financial goals, risk profile (risk tolerance, risk capacity, and risk perception) and asset allocation. Most portfolios need a diversified mix of stocks, bonds and alternative investments. And, they need an experienced, proactive, trusted wealth manager like DWM, who has protected and grown client assets through volatile periods, just like the one we may be encountering now. Give us a call.