Innovation: Showcasing Efficiency and Tightening Security

Companies in the 21st century are constantly looking for way to move their services to the next level of the digital age. Accessibility, convenience, and speed are major factors that industry leaders always look to improve upon, and Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. is no different.

Over the past few weeks, Schwab has put on several presentations in cities across the nation to showcase their technological advancements in a series they call Schwab Solutions. At DWM, we were lucky enough to attend one of these presentations and learned of a lot of exciting new features and opportunities that we believe can assist our clients. Here are some of the highlights:

  • E-Signature->For existing clients looking to open a new account at Schwab, we can utilize a new process called e-signature to send the documents over to your Schwab portal. Simply let DWM know your intention to open a new account, and we can work up the forms to do so. Once the forms are ready, we can send a request for your e-signature, which will send a notification to your Schwab Alliance account. This will assist in opening your account faster, more securely, and with no paper waste!
  • E-Approval->For check and journal requests (moving money from one account to another at Schwab), we can follow a very similar process to the e-signature process, with e-approval! Once again this reduces processing time, paper waste, and improves document accuracy. Schwab is also working to bring this feature to MoneyLink requests, so stay tuned for that improvement!
  • Mobile Deposit->The Schwab app also allows investors to scan/take a picture of the front and back of a check and upload them for deposit, usually within the same day!
  • The Schwab platform itself is receiving an overhaul in the coming months, which should provide clients with a much sleeker, more intuitive experience. A major difference to come will be a personal value chart, which will display a simplified net worth statistic based on the accounts at Schwab, as well as the ability to add in accounts outside of Schwab (think 401ks)!
  • In addition to the aesthetical changes, the Schwab portal now has much more client interactivity than before, which will allow investors to update various information on their accounts all from within the website, no paperwork involved. These various services include:
    • Updating accounts in case of address change
    • Beneficiary updates on IRAs
    • Tax withholding percentages for IRAs

As with any technological advancement, new security challenges often emerge, and Schwab, as well as DWM, are your first line of defense against these threats. For Schwab’s part, they have bumped up security in some major ways:

  • Whenever a new device is used to access a Schwab portal, a text or e-mail is sent (depending on how the security of the specific account is set-up), to ensure that fraudsters are not trying to access your account information electronically.
  • In addition, Schwab offers a security feature called two-factor authentication, which allows for an app on your phone to provide a six-digit code to follow your Schwab Alliance password, further ensuring that only the account holder can access their sensitive information.
  • Finally, one further security measure clients can choose to utilize is called Schwab Voice ID. With this service, a client calls in and answers some basic questions to the Schwab Alliance team, through which their Voice Biometrics system analyzes the quality of your voice. Then, if any suspicious activity occurs in your accounts, Schwab will call and verify the activity with you, using the Biometrics system to ensure that the voice on that end of the line is actually the account holder.

As far as DWM goes, our stance and determination in protecting our clients’ information remains resolute. We are completely committed to client security, and will continue to both provide education to keep our clients informed of rising threats, as well as keeping ourselves up-to-date about viral issues and staying abreast of any suspicious account behavior. For example, one of the most dangerous areas regarding theft and fraud currently going on are real estate scams. Hijackers will find a way into legitmate e-mail threads regarding wire information for a client buying property, and provide phony wire information. As a result, verbal verification is the new normal. As part of our safeguarding protocol, DWM will be calling the client and/or the title company to verify these wire instructions to ensure that everything goes as planned.

At DWM, we are passionate about protecting our clients and helping them shape their financial future, worry-free. This is seen throughout our wealth management process, from investing to account management, to financial planning. We aim to help clients notice and avoid any landmines that might be hiding in their long-term financial plan. Providing safer, more efficient ways of accessing and updating their accounts, while also actively monitoring for suspicious activity and ensuring accuracy is an effective method of doing so.

Please feel free to stay updated on Schwab’s technological advancements through their “Client Learning Center” page found here:

http://content.schwab.com/learningcenter/

Please also feel free to contact DWM with any questions or concerns regarding either advancements or safety.

At DWM, we are passionate about protecting our clients and helping them shape their financial future, worry-free. This is seen throughout our wealth management process, from investing to account management, to financial planning. We aim to help clients notice and avoid any landmines that might be hiding in their long-term financial plan. Providing safer, more efficient ways of accessing and updating their accounts, while also actively monitoring for suspicious activity and ensuring accuracy is an effective method of doing so.

Biases: Fluid & Fuzzy vs Rational

In a perfect world, we would all make optimal decisions that would provide us with the greatest value and satisfaction.  In economics, the rational choice theory states that when you are presented with options, you would choose that which maximizes your personal satisfaction.  This theory assumes that you make your decision by weighing the costs and benefits, without emotion and external factors.  If it were only that simple.

Enter behavioral economics.  It draws on psychology and economics to try to explain why people sometimes make irrational decisions, i.e. not following predictions of economic models based on a consistently rational, self-interested, and “utility” maximizing approach?  Psychology explains this deviation of behavior from what is expected rationally to be caused by “biases.”  Common examples of biases include:

  • Anchoring- relying too heavily on one piece of information
  • Confirmation-focusing on information that confirms one’s preconceptions
  • Endowment-demanding much more for something owned than what you would be willing to pay to acquire it
  • FOMO- Fear of missing out- paying too much to get into the “game”
  • Loss aversion- valuing the pain of losing twice as much as the satisfaction of making a gain
  • Normalcy- refusing to plan for a potential disaster that has never happened before
  • Recency- predicting the future results by expected recent results to continue

Koen Smets’s recent article in the Behavioral Scientist “There is More to Behavioral Economics than Biases and Fallacies” defines behavioral economics as the field that confronts us with our deeply potentially irrational selves.  “We are bamboozled by biases, fooled by fallacies, entrapped by errors, hoodwinked by heuristics, deluded by illusions.”  Ouch.

This brings to mind Ebenezer Scrooge’s question of the Ghost of Christmas Future:  “Are these signs of things that will happen or may happen?”  Perfect question, Ebenezer.  Actually, there is a widespread misconception that biases explain or even produce behavior.  Biases merely describe behavior that may or may not be followed.  They are simply labels for an observed behavior that contradicts traditional economics’ simplified “rational” expectations.

The conversation about biases is generally negative:  they interfere with our decision making or undermine our health, wealth and happiness.  For example, consider loss aversion.  Ten of thousands of years ago, humans were more concerned about losing a week’s food supply than gaining an extra week’s.  Today, an individual might never invest their cash because of a fear of losing money and have the purchasing power of their funds decreased by inflation.  This loss aversion is part of our evolutionary DNA, but that doesn’t mean that we have to exhibit that behavior.

Biases are tendencies that are not uniformly shared or employed.  Mr. Smet describes human behavior as “fluid and fuzzy.” These days, speed and simplification are keys and behavior based on biases is increasing.  Knowing that people are taking shortcuts, marketing has really stepped up its game.

“Heuristics” are really becoming huge. They are the various techniques we use to solve problems, learn or discover by using shortcuts.  Persuasion heuristics save us time and effort in making many of the hundreds of decisions we are confronted with each day.  Robert Cialdini, author of “Persuasion and Marketing” and political consultant, offers six key principles to persuading (or perhaps hoodwinking) a consumer using heuristics:

  • Authority-the voice or face of authority drives results. (Celebrity endorsements work)
  • Commitment and Consistency-consistent follow through establishes trust (Repetition works)
  • Scarcity-create hype based on time limits and expirations. (I see this every time I go to book a hotel room)
  • Liking-people are persuaded by others liking something. (Tripadvisor)
  • Social Proof- Show evidence of results. (People like to hear positive statistics-whether or not they are true)
  • Reciprocity-Offer discounts, free trials, sample products (people tend to “return a favor”)

We know biases exist. Some of them are in our DNA; some we learn over time.  At the same time, people and companies are aware of these potential biases as they are marketing their products, services, or suggestions.  Certainly, for many small decisions we need to make every day, there is no problem with taking a shortcut and even employing a bias.

However, when it comes to really important decisions, such as your wealth and happiness, it’s time to step up your game and move from fluid and fuzzy to rational.  These very important decisions generally take more time and require more due diligence.   You need to make sure you thoroughly and objectively understand and investigate choices and understand the likely risks and rewards of each.  To keep yourself “bias-free” at these times, you may benefit from having the expertise, skill and objectivity of a wealth manager like DWM who works with these important matters every day.  There’s a time for fluid and fuzzy and a time for rationality.  We’re here to help you when it’s time for rationality. Give us a call.

 

 

 

 

 

HERE COME THE MILLENNIALS!

In only 12 years, 75% of American employees will be Millennials.  By then, even the last of the Baby Boomers will be 66 and on social security (though a few of us might still be working).  Generation X is a smaller cohort and some of its 54-65 year olds will already be retired.  The oldest Generation Zers will only be 34 at that time.   Yes, in 2030, the Millennials, aged 35 to 53, will be the backbone of the economy and country.

What an exciting time to be alive!  Can you imagine all the changes that may occur in the next 12 years?  Just consider that just 14 years ago Blockbuster Video had 9,000 stores and is now down to one last store in Oregon. 2004 was also the year Facebook was launched.

Yes, new reality can be exciting and challenging.  The Millennials bring with them their own expectations of life, work and values.  Those organizations and communities that embrace generational diversity will undoubtedly thrive in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous future.

Jennifer Brown, author of “Reversing the Generation Equation: Mentoring in the New Age of Work,” indicates that Millennials “possess the most diverse attitudes, tendencies and requirements of any preceding generation and they are bringing that to work and life and demanding to be welcomed, valued, respected and heard.”  They’ve grown up with being in the center of the activity and expect to stay there.

The Pew Research Center’s “Millennials in Adulthood” takes a look at just how unique this generation is and how the social, political and economic realities in their formative years have shaped them.  Due to a disconnect between Millennials and many organizations not willing to meet them half-way, it’s no surprise that Millennials have experienced greater job dissatisfaction than Generation X and Baby Boomers.

A study conducted by Deloitte showed that 56% of Millennials have “ruled out working for a particular organization because of its values or standard of conduct.”  49% have declined a task assigned to them that was thought to go against personal values or rules of ethics.  According to the study, Millennials are seeking a good work/life balance (more than monetary compensation), their own homes, a partner, flexible working conditions and financial security.  Furthermore, this group does not necessarily defer to seniority as seen in previous generations. For them, respect must be earned.  Which brings us to the concept of “Reverse Mentoring.”

Jack Welch of GE was one of the early pioneers of reverse mentoring.  Twenty years ago, as technological changes were sweeping our country, Mr. Welch encouraged 500 top-level executives at GE to reach out to people younger than them to learn about the internet.  Since then, reverse mentoring has gone beyond technological learning and expanded into ideas, advice and insights.  Organizations such as PWC and AARP are among those who have launched programs.

At PWC, the young mentors are in their early 20s and have been working long enough to understand how it works and short enough to still have a fresh perspective.  The AARP Foundation created a Mentor Up program in 2013 where teens and young adults come together with older generations to keep them current and connected with the younger world.  The young mentor the older mentees on technology and health and fitness.  They also exchange Valentine’s Day cards.  In short, intergenerational connections were made, skills exchanged, understanding obtained and mutual respect and admiration were achieved.

At DWM, we have two excellent young team members; Grant Maddox in Charleston and Jake Rickord in Palatine.  We are just starting a reverse mentoring program at DWM where Grant and Jake will be the mentors and Brett, Jenny, Ginny and I will be the mentees.  Once a month, we set aside lunch time for the mentor to share a topic, theme or idea they are interested in sharing and to explain two-way learning opportunities.  We invest time to learn, get to know one another better and increase our trust and respect for each other.  We are also starting to dismantle the old paradigm that “seniority always knows best.”

Our goal is generational diversity and respect for all.  Yes, the Millennials are coming. And, yes, they come with the most diverse attitudes, tendencies and requirements of any preceding generation.  As they say in World Cup Champion France, “Vive la Difference.”

DWM 2Q18 MARKET COMMENTARY

‘Confusing’. If you look that word up in a dictionary, you’ll see something like “bewildering or perplexing” as its definition. Confusing could be a good way to describe the state of the market. On the one hand, you have a U.S. economy that may have come off one of its strongest quarters in years. On the other hand, there is continued threat of higher interest rates and a tumultuous trade war.

Before looking ahead, let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 2Q18:

Equities: Stocks were mixed in 2q18. Certain pockets did well whereas certain ones did not. For example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index was down 0.7% on the quarter and now in the red for the 2018 calendar year (-1.8%). The Dow’s multinational holdings are more prone to trade-related swings, whereas small caps*, up 7.8% for 2q18 & 7.7% YTD (Year-to-date as of 6/30/18), are not. Emerging stocks**, -8.0% 2q18 & -6.7% YTD, did not fare well. This brewing trade war between the U.S. and China, along with rising interest rates and the rising U.S. dollar, are causing many investors to flee from these so-called riskier areas. We think a good general proxy for global equities is represented by the MSCI AC World Index, which was up a modest 0.72% for the quarter, and now about flat (-0.2%) for the year.

Fixed Income: Yields continued to go up, boosted by the same concerns as last quarter: increasing expectations for growth and inflation in the wake of the recent $1.5 trillion tax cut. The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index, dropped a modest 0.16% for the quarter and now down 1.6% YTD. TheBarclays Global Aggregate Bond Index fell 2.8% (and now down 1.5% YTD) as emerging market bonds suffered for same reasons as mentioned above for emerging market equities.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, registered a +0.4% for 2q18 and now off only 1.3% for the year. Gold*** suffered, -3.5%, however REITs**** and MLPs† had nice quarter returns of 5.8 and 11.5%, respectively.

Like others, you may be thinking something like this right now: “Thank you for providing color on the various assets classes, but I’m still confused. How did a balanced investor fare overall? And where do we go from here?”

Overall, most balanced investors had modest gains for 2q18 and are pretty close to where they were when they started the year.

As for looking forward, we think the area causing the most confusion and uncertainty is the tariff trade war issue. A lot of this is political noise which has weighed down stock prices. What has been, or will be, enacted is quite different than what is being discussed. We are hopeful that the countries can eventually reach a compromise on trade.

In the meantime, the US economy is red hot, with GDP nearing 5.0% and unemployment levels near lows not last seen since 1969. The upcoming earnings season should be exquisite! But all of these positives get analysts worried that the economy may overheat. The Fed’s goal is to raise interest rates enough to keep enough pressure on the brakes of this economy to control inflation, but not too much where it comes to a screeching halt. That being said, inflation is a little bit above the Fed’s target level and as such we would expect to see the Fed continue to raise rates gradually, perhaps for the next 4 -5 quarters. They’ll most likely need to stop at some point as the economy cools when some of the Tax Reform stimulus wears off in the second half of 2019. It’s not an easy job.

“I’m still confused – should we be worried about a recession in the near future?” While we don’t see it happening any time soon, it definitely is an increased possibility, and at some point, will inevitably occur. The goal is to be prepared for it. Don’t let emotions get in the way. Stay diversified and stay invested. Trying to time the market is a losing proposition. A good wealth manager can help you stay disciplined.

The good news is that the next recession will most likely be milder than the last couple for a few reasons including the following:

  • Economies, both here and abroad, are simply more stable than in the past.
  • Valuations are fine today. The forward 12-month PE (Price-to-Equity Ratio) of the S&P500 is right in-line with its 25-yr average of 16.1. International stocks, as represented by the MSCI ACW ex-US Index are even cheaper, trading at a 13.0 forward PE.
  • The Fed certainly does not want another 2008 on its hands. They will continue to be friendly to market participants.

SP GRAPH EDITED

 

Still confused? Hopefully not. But if you are, talk to a wealth manager like DWM. If you look at antonyms for confusion, you will see words like “calm”, “peace”, and “happiness”. That’s what our clients want and what we seek to provide them.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

**represented by the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index

**represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index

***represented by the iShares Gold Trust

****represented by the iShares Global REIT

† represented by the UBS AG London BRH ETracs Alerian MLP ETF

Happy Independence Day!

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Everyone at DWM hopes you and yours will have an excellent celebration with family and friends on July 4th! Hopefully, there will be family reunions, great food, baseball games, picnics, parades, fireworks and more. Have a wonderful time!

We also hope you take a few minutes to think about why we celebrate July 4th. As many of you recall, Thomas Jefferson was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence, though John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and other members of Congress made 86 changes to the document before it was approved on July 4, 1776.   The Declaration consists of three main parts. First, it declares the rights of citizens. Second, it lists the grievances against England’s King George III. And, third, it makes a formal claim of independence.

The most famous words of the Declaration of Independence are:

“We hold these words to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

These powerful words still apply today. We hope that you, your family and all Americans are enjoying your life, liberty and pursuit of happiness on Independence Day and throughout the entire year!

Emptying the Nest

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It is an exciting time of year when smiling faces in caps and gowns are seen everywhere! Recently having the pleasure to witness my son’s graduation, the President of the University of South Carolina made sure that the graduates took the time to thank their parents for helping them get to this important occasion. Absolutely! So, congratulations, parents! Turning 21 or graduating from college are exciting milestones and your kids have now reached what we all consider to be the beginning of “adulthood” as they get ready to enter the “real” world. Kids grow up in all different ways and in all different stages – is your young adult ready for launch?

At DWM, we like to offer proactive financial advice for all members of our clients’ families. As your young adult is readying to depart the nest, however that looks, we think this is a good opportunity to provide some education, as they take the reins of their own financial future. Many college-aged kids have had a student checking account and understand how to use their debit card pretty well by now! They probably have some experience with having a job and budgeting for things they want to buy in the short term. However, some of the more complex financial topics can be intimidating for young adults, While they may have a solid background in finance, it is always good to review concepts like compound interest, building good credit, taxes, buying insurance and understanding 401(k)s, for once they land that first “real” job! We might suggest that a good place to start is by getting a copy of The Wall Street Journal. Guide to Starting Your Financial Life by Karen Blumenthal (https://www.amazon.com/Street-Journal-Guide-Starting-Financial/dp/030740708X ). This book covers issues about renting or buying your first home, basic investing, taxes, purchasing health insurance, buying a car, establishing good credit and saving for retirement, among other topics. Might make a perfect college graduation or 21st birthday gift!

In addition, this is a good time to help them make sure all of their accounts are properly set up, titled appropriately and that they have a savings program in place. Reaching the age of majority, which is age 21 for both Illinois and South Carolina, is a good time to change any custodial accounts like a UTMA and UGMA to individual accounts. It may also be helpful to talk about debt, perhaps review student loans and consider opening a credit card account to establish some credit history. Using debt wisely, having a good emergency fund and responsible budgeting are all really valuable conversations and will help your young adult navigate their new financial map.

Encouraging saving and investing is a fundamental lesson and the “pay yourself first” concept is an important one. Remind them that they are paying their future self and that, just like the rewards for eating right, exercising and wearing sunscreen, saving and investing will benefit the health of their future self (as well as their current self!).

One idea that might help is having an automatic savings app like the one found in The College Investor article https://thecollegeinvestor.com/17610/top-automatic-savings-apps/. Also from The College Investor, you can find numerous financial and investing podcasts available that your young adult may take interest in. Here’s the link to get started: https://thecollegeinvestor.com/6778/top-investing-podcasts/. Or maybe they would want a subscription that focuses on the economy, like The Economist or Wall Street Journal.

If working and the business offers it, they should always make sure to contribute to their 401(k) to get the most advantage of any company match. And, if they don’t already have one, starting a Roth account is another great investment savings vehicle, especially while their starting incomes and lower tax brackets will allow them the opportunity to make annual contributions. Up to $5,500 of their earned income can be directly contributed to a Roth account and the compounded gains will never be taxed. Your young adult can set up automatic transfers to investment accounts or savings vehicles so they get used to not seeing those funds in their everyday account, just like 401(k) contributions. It is a great way to plant the seeds for a successful future!

Once the young adult has gotten some traction and they have good financial habits in motion, encourage them to contact us and check out the Emerging Investors program at DWM http://www.dwmgmt.com/investors/. You can learn even more about the EI program by clicking on this link and accessing one of our recent blogs written by Jake Rickord http://dwmgmt.com/archives-blog/index.php/2017/11/. Our Emerging Investors program offers a specialized financial planning model with DWM investment strategies that uses the automated Schwab IIP platform. Our goal is to help them graduate to full DWM Total Wealth Management clients down the road. The best way to reach the level of a TWM client is not just by higher earning, but by stronger and earlier investing. We love to educate and help others plan for their financial future. We are always available if you or your young adult have any questions and would certainly welcome feedback.   Please let us know how we can be of assistance!

 

Rates keep going up! Should I Still Buy That McMansion I’ve Been Dreaming of??

BMIFeature-Rising-Rates-Minimal.pngThe ultra-inexpensive era of mortgage rates is coming to an end, and quickly. Mortgage rates have reached unprecedented 7-year highs. The average 30-year mortgage this week will cost consumers 4.7%, up nearly a full 1% from 2016.

While a 1% increase may not seem like the end of the world, it is important to realize the effect this may have over the course of a mortgage. Consider a consumer who purchased a home with a $200,000 mortgage in 2016. Assuming a 3.7% interest rate, this would amount to a principal and interest monthly payment of $921. In today’s environment, the same consumer may have a monthly payment of $1,037. Over the life of a conventional 30-year mortgage, today’s consumers may pay $41,760 more than those who locked in a rate in 2016.

Reviewing rates in today’s environment may leave some consumers discouraged. However, in comparison to many historical rates, today’s rates are actually relatively low. Take 1981, for example, when the average 30-year mortgage rate was 16.64%. Using a 16.64% interest rate, a $200,000 mortgage in 1981 would cost the consumer $2,793 per month, or, over the course of 30 years, $632,160 more than a consumer today.

For those looking to purchase a new home, the question remains: Is now a good time to buy? The answer is not so simple. There are a few factors to consider before determining if it’s the right time to buy for you.

First of all, as the economy improves overall, mortgage rates are likely to continue to increase. The culprit behind increased mortgage rates is actually surging wage growth. According to the Census and Bureau of Labor Statistics, average household income is at an all-time high, while mortgage rates have been laying low—until now. As wage growth continues to increase the money supply to consumers, consumer spending power increases. Unfortunately, increased consumer spending also increases demand for goods and will ultimately raise the price of goods–inflation.

With the expectation of rising inflation comes a steady increase in the yield of the 10-year Treasury note. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, which usually affects the 30-year mortgage rate, has risen to its highest close since 2011, ending up at just over 3.1%.

In addition, the Federal Reserve has indicated that it will be raising short-term rates at least three to four times this year alone, and potentially several more times in the coming years.

Current home owners should also not expect to refinance anytime soon. As rates rise, the group of homeowners who would benefit from or be eligible for mortgage refinancing has decreased drastically by 46% this year, according to Black Knight Inc.—the smallest group since 2008.

But with mortgage rates trending upward and no sign of lowering again in sight, many people are choosing to strike while they still have the chance.

Overall, your decision depends on if you want to wait it out and hope that mortgages rates will decrease again, or if you want to buy now while the rates are still relatively low, even with the 1% jump. One effective tip to help counteract for the increase in mortgage rates is to lower your price range accordingly and look for a house priced lower than what you would have pursued had mortgage rates remained at their lowest point.

Of course, there are many other factors besides mortgage rates which may affect a consumer’s decision to purchase a home. For example, economic factors such as rising rents, home appreciation, and predictable monthly housing payments.

Bottom line: Rising rates are expected to continue for some time, so it is important to weigh all factors at play and make the decision that’s right for you today and in the future.

First Grexit, Then Brexit, Now Itexit?

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The future of the EU is in question again- for the 3rd time in 4 years. In June 2015, the Greek financial crisis brought us Grexit. Two years later, the Brexit vote passed. And, now we may have Itexit. The political turmoil in Italy could result in Italy renouncing the euro and reviving the lira. Italy was a founding member of the EU and its exit could cause severe economic disruptions worldwide.

The two parties that won the March 4th Italian elections, the Five Star Movement and the League, have been hostile toward EU rules and the interference by Brussels in Italy’s affairs. They joined forces to form a government and proposed euroskeptic Paolo Savona as their choice for economics minister. Mr. Savona co-authored a blueprint for Italy to leave the EU. Current Italian President Sergio Mattarella rejected Mr. Savona and effectively collapsed the attempt to form a government. Mr. Mattarella’s Democratic Party has supported staying in the EU and was a big loser in the spring elections. Now, it looks like new elections later this summer are likely, which could amount to a referendum on Italy remaining in the EU.  

In 2015, Greek voters overwhelmingly rejected EU bailout terms requiring austerity. Greece defaulted on some of its debt and ultimately agreed to a third bailout, worth $100 billion, which imposed further cuts on spending. Grexit proved to be a powerful force for the Eurozone to work together and develop closer ties and more consistent and tougher fiscal rules. Greece is on schedule to be free from the burden of bailouts in August.

The UK is scheduled to withdraw from the EU on March 29, 2019, with a 21 month transition period out to December 31, 2020. Despite delays in negotiations, the UK government and UK opposition party say Brexit will happen. Since Brexit, the British pound first slumped, then regained its losses against the U.S. dollar, but has remained down 15% to the euro. Bank of England Governor Mark Carney indicated that Brexit has reduced UK GDP by $60 billion already. There is an ongoing debate as to what the relationship between the UK and the EU will be post-Brexit. If there is no agreement on trade, the UK would operate with the EU under World Trade Organization rules, which could mean customs checks and tariffs on goods as well as longer border checks. It could also mean Britain losing its position as a global financial center and its citizens living in other parts of the EU will lose their residency rights and health insurance. The next negotiation summit will be this June.

Before the euro, Italy had the power to raise or lower interest rates on their currency to impact its value. A cheap lira made Italian exports less expensive around the world, strengthening their economy at home. But, with the euro, Italy has no control over interest rates or prices. The populists, who did well in the recent elections, complained that their spending power has declined with the euro and EU membership has undermined Italian sovereignty. However, now Luigi di Maio, leader of the Five Star Movement, has said his party never supported leaving the euro.

Many experts agree that if Italy left the euro, it would be poorer, likely default on its debts and the lira would become greatly devalued. A default could lead to retribution from other countries and potential asset freezes and economic isolation. If this occurred, the trustworthiness of the euro as a currency would be questioned and the impact could destroy confidence in the EU itself.

Let’s hope Italy stays in the EU. The UK is starting to realize that the populism that brought Brexit can be quite expensive and painful. The Greeks certainly didn’t like austerity, but the tough rules of the EU put their country in a better spot. Itexit would harm Italians, the EU and the world. Let’s hope if there is a referendum, the Italians will vote for the greater good and stay in the EU.

The End of an Era

barbara-bush 2Barbara Bush was one of our country’s most cherished Grande Dames of politics and we were all saddened recently when she passed. With her signature white hair and pearls and her no-nonsense attitude, we were a little in awe, as well as inspired, by her example of family loyalty, faith, public service and good manners. She broke boundaries as the First Lady and championed education issues in her life, while remaining a loving wife and strong matriarch for her family. Regardless of what you think of her family’s politics, Barbara Bush was a woman to be admired.

Part of her legacy will now be the grace and dignity with which she managed her end of life. Surrounded by family at her home, she left this earth with the peace and comfort that we all might aspire to. Achieving that smooth and tranquil transition requires some planning, however. There are certain things that can and should be arranged and recorded ahead of time so that one’s loved ones are not unduly burdened and so that your own comfort and care are well-managed.

Caroline Feeney, in an article on wealthmanagement.com, recently outlined some of the lessons learned by watching Barbara Bush. We think these are valuable to review.

1.Understand Probate – Anyone who has been through probate will tell you to avoid it! Probate can be expensive, time-consuming and becomes part of the public record. Protecting your assets with proper titling and using a revocable or living trust can keep assets from going through the probate system. All revocable trusts remain private and anyone can set one up for their beneficiaries.

2.Plan for Contingencies – Think of all the scenarios that might come up. Select trustees and successor trustees with care and with a back-up plan. Consider the age, health and circumstances of beneficiaries, like substance addiction or divorce protection, when determining the age or terms of your designations.

3.Personal Property Memorandum – These are the softer, more sentimental items that you own. Houses and cars are protected by a trust or designated titling and a personal property memo provides a plan for the smaller tangible items. Someone will have to address these personal belongings when you are gone and, since you know them best, you should outline your plans for taking care of them. You only need to refer to the memo in a will or trust for it to be legally recorded. The list can be changed and updated, as you see fit, without involving a lawyer each time!

4.Palliative Care – Less than 30% of people have a Health Care Power of Attorney (HCPOA) that spells out the kind of care you want to receive and the people that you want making the decisions on your behalf if you cannot. The HCPOA allows an agent to make health care decisions, if you are incapacitated, for things like life support, tube feeding or organ donation. Consider those that might not be overcome with grief as agents who are tasked to comply with your wishes.

5.Prepare an inventory of all accounts – This includes a list of all bank and investment accounts with passwords, as well as all digital assets, including social media accounts. You can use a password vault or keep a handwritten list in a safe and then give access to one of your designated trustees.

6.Have Tax Planning Up to Date – The estate tax limits have increased in 2018 ($11.2M individual/$22.4M married couple), so most of us will not need to worry about estate taxes, unless the legislation changes again! It is still a good idea to have all of your information gathered, organized and up to date to make it easier for your executors, trustees and beneficiaries.

7.Designated Beneficiary Planning – We always help our clients make sure that all assets are titled properly, including real estate, investment accounts, qualified plans, bank accounts and life insurance policies.

8.Review Plan Regularly – Once you have a good plan in place, you should review it every year or two or as there are any life changes. At DWM, we keep copies of your documents with our own summary “estate flow” to help manage this.

9.Use Professionals! – This includes a recommended estate attorney to prepare your plan, as well as a professional wealth manager, like DWM, to review it.

10.Everyone Can Have an Estate Plan – You don’t need to be a famous, well-connected political icon, like Barbara Bush, to be thoroughly prepared.

Estate planning can be a daunting and sometimes complicated task. Many of our clients have trepidation about the process when starting, but every one of them feel a great deal of relief and accomplishment when they have done all the work and have a good estate plan in place. Helping our clients navigate all of the requirements and considerations of estate planning is a very important and satisfying part of what we do at DWM. We are not lawyers, but we know our clients well and can help them understand the many objectives and appropriate pieces of a good customized estate plan. Please let us know if you would like to review your estate plan with us!

Supreme Court Overturns Ban on Sports Gambling

NBA slot machine

On Monday, the Supreme Court struck down the 1992 federal law that said states couldn’t “sponsor, advertise, promote, license or authorize” sports gambling. The ruling in Murphy vs. NCAA agreed with New Jersey that the law was an intrusion into states’ rights to regulate activity within their borders. NJ had waged a six-year battle against the NCAA, NBA, NFL, MLB and NHL to allow sports betting. NJ will now join Nevada as the two states with legalized gambling. More will certainly follow. Illinois and South Carolina have already introduced bills and are moving towards legalization.

The states, the leagues and lots of others are all licking their chops to participate. The American Gaming Association estimates that $150 billion is wagered every year on illegal bets. Now, sports gambling could become more widespread, more systematic with an even larger market. Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, believes that the overall value of sports franchises has doubled overnight. “It will increase interest in the arena or stadium, it will increase the viewership for customers online, and help traditional television networks.”

The NBA has discussed with state officials what it calls an “integrity fee” of 1% on all betting. The integrity fee would be needed, in part, to pay for more assistance to league officials to keep the league honest, thus policing players and coaches so that games are not “thrown” to win bets. MLB has proposed a .25% integrity fee. Ted Leonsis, owner of both the Washington Capitals and Wizards, said that the sport franchises need to be paid “equitably” for the content and “intellectual property” they provide to television.

Pennsylvania last year passed legislation to allow sports betting, which included a 36% tax on sports betting revenue. Nevada’s rate is 6.75%. While some states may resist on moral grounds (Utah’s anti-gambling stance is written into its constitution), most will jump on the bandwagon as soon as possible. It has been estimated that $245 billion in legalized sports betting could generate $16 billion in additional state tax income.

Sports data companies, like Sportradar and gambling companies, like MGM and Caesars Entertainment, are hoping to cash in. The betting public can now come out of the “underground” market. Legal bookmakers should do well-Nevada sportsbooks haven’t had a losing month since 2013.

And what about the players and their salaries? If the NBA received a 1% fee, under the current union contract, half of that would be owed to the players. So, if $50 billion of NBA related sports betting produced a $500 million “bonus”, half of that would go to the players. And, this extra money might raise the salary cap and cause crazy gyrations with many top players changing teams.

However, there’s only so much money to go around. Last year, Nevada’s sportsbooks had a 5% profit margin, according to the state’s gaming board. A 1% “integrity fee” would represent 20% of the profit. With everyone fighting for their piece of the pie, legalized gambling may not take off as quickly as expected.

Joe Asher, chief executive of William Hill US, part of a major British sports betting operation, cautions that tax rates and league fees could add to the complexities: “It’s not going to be easy to move customers from the black market into the legal market.” Time will tell.