DWM 3Q18 MARKET COMMENTARY

Get yourself fit! A diversified portfolio is like a well-balanced diet. You need all major asset classes/food groups for proper nutrition. Think of the major asset classes (equities, fixed income, alts) as your protein, carbs, and fats. If you were to load up in one particular area (e.g. carb loading), you might feel better in the short-term, but it could seriously affect your health in the long-term. And it’s the same way with investing: if you “overindulged” in any one particular area for too long; you are bound to get ill at some point. Which is a good segway for this quarter’s market commentary. Yes, US stocks – those in the large cap growth area in particular – ended the third quarter near records, but now is not the time to be one-dimensional.

But, before we dive into a proper nutritional program, let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 3q18:

Equities: Let’s start with the spicy lasagna…the S&P500, the hot index right now, which climbed 7.7% in the quarter and up 10.6% for the calendar year. However, most don’t realize that just three companies (Apple, Amazon, & Microsoft) make up one-quarter of those year-to-date (“YTD”) gains. Besides these outliers, returns in general for equities are more muted as represented by the MSCI AC World Index registering a 3.9% 3q18 & 3.65% YTD return. Emerging Markets* continue to be the cold broccoli, down 1.1% for the quarter and now -7.7% for the year. In other words, even though the headlines – which like to focus on domestic big-cap stocks, like the ones in the S&P500 and Dow – are flashing big numbers; in reality, the disparity amongst equity benchmark returns is huge this year with some areas up sizably and some areas down sizably.

Fixed Income: The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index, was basically unchanged for the quarter and down 1.6% YTD. The Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index fell 0.9% and now down 2.4% YTD. Pretty unappetizing. The shorter duration, i.e. the weighted average of the times until the fixed cash flows within your bond portfolio are received, the better your return. It’s a challenging environment when interest rates go up, but the Fed continues to do so in a gradual and transparent manner. Last week, the Fed raised its benchmark federal-funds rate to a range between 2% and 2.25%. We could see another four rate hikes, one for each Fed quarterly meeting, before they stop/pause for a while.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, increased +0.7% for the quarter and now off only 1.2% for the year. Alts come in many different shapes and forms so we’ll highlight just a few here. Gold** continued to drop, down 4.9% for qtr and now off 8.6% for year. Oil*** continues to rise, up 4.7% 3q18 & 27.5% YTD. MLPs**** jumped 6.4% on the quarter and now +5.0% for 2018. Whereas alts have not been “zesty” as of late, think of them like your morning yogurt: a great source of probiotics, a friendly bacteria that can improve your health when other harmful bacteria emerge.

So after a decent 3q18 for most investors, where do we go from here and what should be part of one’s nutritional program?

Let’s first talk about the economy. It’s been on a buttery roll as of late. The Tax Cut & Jobs Act of 2017 has created a current environment for US companies that has rarely been more scrumptious, as evidenced by earnings per share growth of 27% year-over-year (“YOY”). Unemployment clicked in at last measure at 3.9% and most likely will continue to drop in the near future. With the economy this strong, many may find it surprising to see the lack in wage growth and inflation. Wages are only up 2.8% and core inflation is up only up 2.0% YOY. Wages are staying under control as the Baby Boomers and their higher salaries exit the work field, replaced by lower-salaried Millennials and Gen Z. Part of the lack of inflation growth is because of the internet/technology that gives so much information to the Buyer at the tip of their fingers, keeping a lid on prices. Trade talk/tariffs, have been a big headliner as of late creating a lot of volatility; but that story only seems to be improving with the revised NAFTA taking shape with Mexico and Canada. Some type of agreement with China could be on the near horizon too.

This is all delectable news, but the tax stimulus effect will peak in mid-2019 and companies will have to perform almost perfectly to remain at their current record profit margin levels. With earnings a major component of valuation, any knock to them could affect stock prices. Further, the S&P500 is now trading at a forward PE ratio of 16.8x, which is north of its 16.1x 25-year average. This is not the case in other areas of the world – Europe, Japan, Emerging Markets – where valuations are actually lower than averages. If you haven’t done so already, time to put those on your menu.

It’s not only a good diet you want for your portfolio; you also want to make sure of proper fitness/maintenance, i.e. rebalancing back to established long-term asset allocation mix targets. Time to bank some of those equity gains and reinvest those into the undervalued areas if you haven’t already done so recently. Regular portfolio rebalancing helps reduce downside investment risk and instills discipline so that investors avoid “buying high” and “selling low”, a savory way to keeping you and your portfolio healthy.

In conclusion, we are in interesting times. The economy is peppery-hot, but incapable of keeping this pace. A slowdown is inevitable. The question is two-fold: how big will that slow-down be, and are you prepared for it? Now is the time to revisit your risk tolerance and compare that to how much risk is in your current portfolio. That spicy lasagna, aka the S&P500, has been a delicious meal as of late, but don’t let too much of it ruin your diet. Make sure your portfolio is diversified in a well-balanced manner. Stay healthy and in good shape by working with a wealth manager like DWM who can keep your portfolio as fit as a triathlete.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

*represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index

**represented by the iShares Gold Trust

***represented by the Morningstar Brent Crude Commodity ER USD

****represented by the UBS AG London BRH ETracs Alerian MLP ETF

THE FINANCIAL CRISIS: 10 YEARS LATER

On September 15, 2008, Lehman Brothers imploded; filing a $691 billion bankruptcy that sent stock markets into a deep dive of 40% or more. The global financial crisis ultimately would destroy trillions of dollars in wealth- $70,000 for every single American. The deep financial trough produced the Great Recession.

Now, 10 years later, how are we doing and what lessons have we learned?

How are we doing?

Official economic statistics would say that the American economy is fully recovered. We are in a 9+ year bull market with a cumulative total return of 350%. The total combined output of the American economy, known as our gross domestic product (“G.D.P.”) has risen 20% since the Lehman crisis. The unemployment rate is lower than it was before the financial crisis. These key measurements, now a century old tradition, however, don’t tell the whole story. The official numbers are accurate, but not that meaningful.

For many Americans, the financial crisis of 2008-2009 isn’t over. It left millions of people-who were already just “getting by”- even more anxious and angry about their future. The issue is inequality. A small, affluent segment of the population receives the bulk of the economy’s harvest. It was true 10 years ago and is even more so today. So, while major statistics look good, they really don’t measure our country’s “human well-being.”

The stock market is now 60% higher than when the crisis began in 2007. While the top 10% of Americans own 84% of the stocks, the other 90% are much more dependent on their homes for their overall net worth. The net worth of the median (not the “average”) household is still 20% lower than it was in 2007, despite the record highs for the stock markets.

The unemployment rate, currently at 3.9%, does not take into account two major items. First, the number of idle working-age adults has swelled. Many of them would like to work, but they can’t find a decent job and have given up looking. Currently, 15% of men aged 25-54 are not working and not even looking; therefore, they are not considered “unemployed.” Second, many Americans are working at or near the federal minimum hourly wage- which has been $7.25 per hour since July 2009. Neither group is benefitting from low, low unemployment rates.

There is a movement to change these metrics to something more meaningful.   A team of economists, Messrs. Zucman, Saez and Piketty, have begun publishing a version of G.D.P. that separates out the share of national income flowing to rich, middle class and poor. At the same time, the Labor Department could modify the monthly jobs report to give more attention to other unemployment numbers. The Federal Reserve could publish quarterly estimates of household wealth by economic class. Such reports could change the way the country communicates about the economy. Economist and Nobel Laureate Simon Kuznets, who oversaw the first G.D.P. calculation in 1873, cautioned people not to confuse G.D.P. with “economic welfare.”

What lessons have we learned?

Mohammed A. El-Erian, the chief economic adviser at Allianz, the corporate parent of PIMCO, recently summarized, in the “Investment News,” some key lessons learned from the crisis.

Accomplishments:

  • A safer banking system due to strengthened capital buffers, more responsible approaches to balance sheets and better liquidity management
  • A more robust payment and settlement system to minimize the risk of “sudden stops” in counterpart payments
  • Smarter international cooperation including improved harmonization, stronger regulation and supervision and better monitoring

Still outstanding issues:

  • Long-term growth still relying on quick fixes rather than structural and secular components
  • Misaligned internal incentives encouraging some institutions who are still taking pockets of improper risk-taking
  • The big banks got bigger and the small got more complex through the gradual hollowing out of the medium-sized financial firms
  • Reduced policy flexibility in the event of a crisis because interest rates in most of the advanced world, outside of the U.S., are still near zero and world-wide debt is significantly higher than 10 years ago.

Yes, we’ve made some good progress in the last 10 years since the financial crisis. But, there’s still plenty of room for improvement.

Financial Literacy: Money Matters!

As you all know, we provide proactive financial advice on matters such as investment management and value-added services such as tax planning, risk management and estate planning to name a few.  Something you probably didn’t know is that earlier this year, we launched a campaign to promote financial literacy for children and young adults!  It is called the Young Investors program.  Some of our clients have recently become the first recipients of this new program!

Financial literacy is a person’s ability to recognize and use the money and other resources he or she has to get what is needed and wanted.  Another way of saying this is that financial literacy is being able to set goals for using financial resources, make plans, and use the plans to meet financial demands and achieve goals.  To achieve financial literacy, a person needs to have experiences with money.  That is why it is important that children begin to learn about money and its use when they are young.

You might not know this, but financial literacy availability for young children is scarce, primarily because the school systems lack time and budget resources to incorporate financial education into the curriculums.  In fact, only 16 states require any instruction in economics between Kindergarten and 12th grade.  Even worse, only 7 states require students to take courses in personal finance.

There’s been a greater awareness of this educational need in the past 10 years and some financial-literacy advocacy groups have begun to take some steps to fill this educational void.  Some have responded by offering summer camps to young children whose parents want to teach their children the basics of money management.  Feedback from many of the attendees is that, believe it or not, they had fun!  Of course, we want to join in on the fun, and we are also excited to be a part of the solution.

We know that a financial foundation is best achieved when started early, reviewed, as well as reinforced often.  It’s important to teach young children even before they are in school about the concept of money, and that it’s not all about spending!  For example, something simple that a parent can start as early as age 3 can have lasting effects for the future.  Consider this:

Activity: Tell your toddler that you’ll give him a cookie now if he wants it, but you’ll give him two cookies if he waits an extra ten minutes. See what he chooses and try to encourage him to wait for the extra cookie.

Lesson Learned: Be patient and wait for a bigger payoff, rather than always going for instant gratification.

Although it might not look like much, it sets the stage for a less impulsive, more thoughtful response, and hopefully not just one involving money in the future!

Thinking about the scenario above, in an article I read the other day from the Wall Street Journal on personal finance summer camps, a 12 year old boy cited some camp attendance takeaways such as stopping and pausing before making purchases and long term planning!  I suppose it’s true that small things do matter!  And more interesting feedback from the camp directors is that many children ages 10-14 didn’t know what stock and bonds were.  Some thought the investments were a form of real estate.  Clearly, more attention needs to be given to this area.

We love the opportunities these summer camps offer and hope to provide some of our own financial education to our client families year round.  With our financial literacy agenda, our Young Investor program is structured with several tiers of age appropriate interactions and dialogue starters on financial matters for our clients to have with their children or grandchildren.  Age appropriate financial suggestions, tools, links to pertinent financial articles and fun activities to engage their minds are some of the content we will be sharing.  With the importance of starting as early as possible, we literally start at the very beginning, with newly born children/grandchildren, and capture all ages through the early 20s.  Specifically, we break out the tiers in roughly 5 year intervals, so age 0-5 years is the first group, 5-10 years is next, then 10-15 years, with 15-20ish years being the last group.  Our goal is that by age 25, the child or grandchild will be more than ready to begin a lifetime of investing!

Even after your children and grandchildren start their careers, it is our hope that they will join our Emerging Investor program, where they can establish their own brokerage accounts with Charles Schwab and have some of the same great DWM advantages and services as their parents and grandparents.  We are happy to help them by protecting and growing a diversified portfolio to preserve assets and provide moderate growth with minimal risk.

With our help, the young children of today will come to ask for financial assistance and have some of the best mentors in their lives, YOU!  And we all know that money is not an elective in life, so let’s keep the dialogue going with our young generation and keep providing them with good ‘sense’!  We hope you find this program to be a valuable experience.  As always, please let us know your thoughts or if you need financial assistance with a young investor in your life.

Tax Efficient Investing

Think of these opposites:  Good/Bad.  Rich/Poor.  Gain/Loss. Joy/Sadness.  Investment Returns/Income Taxes.  Yes, Uncle Sam is happy to take all the joy out of your investment returns and tax them.  That’s why tax efficient investing is so important.

You have three types of investment accounts: taxable, tax deferred or tax exempt.  For taxable accounts, you must pay taxes in the year income is received.  Retirement accounts, IRAs and annuities are examples of tax deferred accounts, in which you pay tax on the income when you take it out. Tax-exempt accounts, like Roth IRAs and Roth 401ks, are not taxed even at withdrawal.

Strategy #1:  Know Your Bracket.  The tax brackets have changed for 2018.  The top federal marginal rate of 37% will hit taxpayers of $500,000 and higher for single filers and $600,000 for married couples filing jointly.  There can be a huge difference between taxes on current ordinary income and taxes on long-term capital gains. Capital gains are the appreciation on your holdings over time and often represent a very significant portion of your total investment return.  Securities held for over a year generally qualify for long-term capital gain taxes, which are taxed at 0% to 20%, with most investors paying 15%. The difference between ordinary and capital gains taxes on your investment income can be substantial.

Strategy #2:  Asset Allocation includes Asset “Location.”  Tax efficient investments should be in taxable accounts, tax inefficient investments should be in tax deferred or tax-exempt accounts.  For example, bonds are tax inefficient.  Interest earned on bonds in taxable accounts is income in the year received and is taxed at ordinary income tax rates.  However, bond interest earned in a tax deferred account is also taxed as ordinary income, but only at withdrawal, when presumably you might be at lower income and tax levels.  Hence, bonds should generally be located in tax deferred accounts, such as IRAs and 401ks.

Stocks are more tax efficient. First, the qualified dividends received on stocks are taxed at the capital gains tax rate, which is likely less than your ordinary income tax rate. And, second, the largest part of your investment return on equities is often your capital gain, which is also generally at 15% tax and is only paid when you sell a security.  Hence, stocks and equity funds are tax efficient and generally should be located in taxable accounts.  Conversely, holding equities in retirement accounts is not generally a good idea because even though the tax is deferred, the ultimate withdrawals will be taxed at ordinary rates, not capital gains.

Alternative investments, which are designed to be non-correlated with bonds and stocks, may generate more ordinary income than tax-efficient income.  Hence, they should generally be located in tax deferred accounts.  Tax-exempt accounts, such as Roth accounts, can hold tax efficient and tax inefficient holdings. Hence, tax-exempt accounts are already tax efficient and can hold all three asset classes; equity, fixed income and alternatives, in appropriate asset allocations without any income tax cost.

Strategy #3:  Grow your Roth Assets.  Because Roth assets are tax-exempt and, therefore, 100% tax efficient, they are the most valuable investment asset you can own; both in your lifetime and your heirs.  Roths only have investment returns, no taxes.  Furthermore, Roth accounts, unlike traditional IRA accounts, do not require minimum distributions when you and/or your spouse reach 70 ½.  Upon your passing, the beneficiaries of your Roth assets can “stretch them” by allowing them to continue to grow them tax-free. However, the heirs will be required to take minimum distributions.

Roths can be funded in a number of ways.  If you have earnings, you can make Roth contributions of $5,500 per year ($6,500 if you are 50 or over) if your income is below a certain threshold.  In addition, if you are working for a company with a 401k plan, that plan may allow Roth 401k contributions. In this case, there are no earnings limitations and you can contribute $18,500 ($24,500 if you are 50 or over.)  You can also convert IRAs to Roths.  This is done by paying income tax on the difference between the amount converted and the cost basis of the IRA. There is no limit of the amount you can convert.  The concept is “pay tax once, have the Roth grow tax-free forever.” Oftentimes this conversion takes place after retirement but before age 70 ½ and is done in an annual installment amount to keep the tax implications within a given tax bracket.   We encourage you and/or your CPA to look at this possibility.

Strategy #4:  Do an Income Tax Projection.  Tax projections are really important, particularly in 2018, with all the new changes brought on by tax reform.  The projection provides information as to your income, deductions, tax bracket, estimated taxes (to minimize surprises and penalties) and, hopefully, also possibilities for tax savings.  We prepare “unofficial” tax projections for our clients for these very reasons.  Investment management must consider income taxes.

Ultimately, your return on investments is your gross return less the income taxes.  Therefore, we encourage you to make your investment portfolio operate as tax efficiently as possible and accentuate the positive; good, rich, gain, joy and investment returns.  Rather than the negative; bad, poor, loss, sad and income taxes.  You should make yourself happy, not Uncle Sam.

Happy Labor Day: Fun Facts!

Labor Day in the 21st century means time for beaches, BBQ, ballgames and quality time with family and friends. For many, Labor Day signifies the last days of summer. But don’t worry, the official end of summer is September 21st so you still have some time to catch some waves and rays. Although Labor Day always falls on the first Monday of every September, there is a lot more to this holiday weekend than an extra day off from work and great sales. From a survey done by WalletHub, here are 10 facts about Labor Day that you may not know:

  1. 133 million Americans will enjoy a BBQ this Labor Day

 

  1. The average Labor Day shopper will spend $58

 

  1. 25% of Americans plan to get out of town

 

  1. The top three Labor Day destinations include New York City, Chicago, and Las Vegas

 

  1. Labor Day is America’s third favorite holiday behind Christmas/Chanukah and Memorial Day

 

  1. There are approximately 89 running races held over Labor Day weekend

 

  1. The number one hardest working city in America is San Francisco with an 8 hour average work day, and the laziest city in America is Columbia, SC with an average work day of 7.3 hours

 

  1. Labor Day is the unofficial end of hot dog season in America. From Memorial Day to Labor Day there are 818 hot dogs eaten per second

 

  1. Most Americans believe Labor Day is only an American holiday when really it was started in Canada

 

  1. Last but not least, yes, you really can wear white after Labor Day!

From everyone here at DWM, have a great Labor Day Weekend and enjoy some time with the family!

Mother Nature is in Charge!

Americans are getting a little disaster weary.  From the horrific wildfires out west to torrential rains and flooding all summer in the east, it has been quite a year.  And in the south and east, we all know what August means…hurricane season is upon us!  Mother Nature is getting on our nerves in 2018!

How can we protect ourselves to minimize the risks to our homes, our property and our livelihoods?  Mitigating risks from catastrophic events starts with prevention and planning by both government and individuals.  Prevention can start with using damage-resistant building materials, having elevated home designs, enforcing safe building codes, developing flood plain management systems, securing or removing hazards ahead of storms and by having evacuation or escape plans in place.  FEMA has an 81 page guide of Mitigation Ideas to deal with earthquakes, landslides, floods, hurricanes, hail, lightning, tornadoes, severe winter weather and more.  https://www.fema.gov/media-library-data/20130726-1904-25045-2423/fema_mitigation_ideas_final_01252013.pdf  There are many threats coming from our environment, but many things that can be done to lessen some of the painful aftermath of these occurrences.

We certainly can use property & casualty insurance to plan and prepare for the worst.  In hurricane-prone areas, for example, we have riders for “named storm” or “wind and hail” coverage that comes with our homeowner’s insurance.  The costs of the insurance can be reduced by increasing the amount of a deductible you want to have or, in other words, how much you can afford to pay out of pocket for repairs after a storm.  We also look for extra coverage for those circumstances when there is a widespread event like a hurricane that may drive costs up with higher demand for labor and materials.  Homeowners may want to have an extended coverage rider built in to help with those higher costs.  It is important to evaluate what your risk tolerance is for these situations and how much you want to pay to transfer some of the risk to the insurance company.  If your home is destroyed or badly damaged, do you have a comfortable level of protection for you and your family?

There has been much discussion on the 50 year old National Flood Insurance Program, as well. President Trump recently signed the legislation to extend the debt-ridden program until November 30th.  That means not dealing with necessary reforms until after hurricane season and mid-term elections.  The federal program, which is some $20 billion in debt to the U.S. Treasury, offers subsidized flood insurance to coastal or flood-prone areas where private insurers have pulled out or made it unaffordable.   As it is, the NFIP provides coverage with caps on claims for homes at $250,000 and on property at $100,000.  Many higher-value property owners may choose to also carry “excess” flood insurance to bridge the gap between the federal program caps and the value of their homes and property.

Unfortunately, the reduced premiums from about 5 million NFIP flood insurance policies nationwide cannot adequately support the claims that have come from recent events, including storms like Sandy, Katrina, Harvey, Maria, Irma and Matthew.  And hurricanes aren’t the only cause of flooding.  We have seen some of these epic rainstorms cause significant inland flooding and damage.   As the head of the SC Department of Insurance said recently, “our entire state is in a flood-zone.”  And this may be true for many areas in the South, East and Midwest.  It is clear there is a need for a flood program that can provide support for affected residents after a storm, especially as we see changing climate conditions and rising sea levels. Lawmakers thus far have been unable to find a bi-partisan fix to the financially strained system.

As homeowners and members of our communities, we should certainly do our share to prepare for these natural events and make sure we have a solid plan in place for our families and our property.  We can maintain our property, keep our own emergency fund and can participate in the insurance coverages available to help protect us.  And we should hope and expect that our legislators – local, state and national- will compromise to find solutions to reform existing programs and to prepare disaster plans that can assist all of us in the event of a catastrophic event.

At DWM, we use a holistic approach to evaluating your financial plan, including risk management.  We will help you review all of your property & casualty insurance policies to ensure that you have appropriate coverage for you and your family.  Let’s hope Mother Nature stays peaceful for the rest of the year!

Innovation: Showcasing Efficiency and Tightening Security

Companies in the 21st century are constantly looking for way to move their services to the next level of the digital age. Accessibility, convenience, and speed are major factors that industry leaders always look to improve upon, and Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. is no different.

Over the past few weeks, Schwab has put on several presentations in cities across the nation to showcase their technological advancements in a series they call Schwab Solutions. At DWM, we were lucky enough to attend one of these presentations and learned of a lot of exciting new features and opportunities that we believe can assist our clients. Here are some of the highlights:

  • E-Signature->For existing clients looking to open a new account at Schwab, we can utilize a new process called e-signature to send the documents over to your Schwab portal. Simply let DWM know your intention to open a new account, and we can work up the forms to do so. Once the forms are ready, we can send a request for your e-signature, which will send a notification to your Schwab Alliance account. This will assist in opening your account faster, more securely, and with no paper waste!
  • E-Approval->For check and journal requests (moving money from one account to another at Schwab), we can follow a very similar process to the e-signature process, with e-approval! Once again this reduces processing time, paper waste, and improves document accuracy. Schwab is also working to bring this feature to MoneyLink requests, so stay tuned for that improvement!
  • Mobile Deposit->The Schwab app also allows investors to scan/take a picture of the front and back of a check and upload them for deposit, usually within the same day!
  • The Schwab platform itself is receiving an overhaul in the coming months, which should provide clients with a much sleeker, more intuitive experience. A major difference to come will be a personal value chart, which will display a simplified net worth statistic based on the accounts at Schwab, as well as the ability to add in accounts outside of Schwab (think 401ks)!
  • In addition to the aesthetical changes, the Schwab portal now has much more client interactivity than before, which will allow investors to update various information on their accounts all from within the website, no paperwork involved. These various services include:
    • Updating accounts in case of address change
    • Beneficiary updates on IRAs
    • Tax withholding percentages for IRAs

As with any technological advancement, new security challenges often emerge, and Schwab, as well as DWM, are your first line of defense against these threats. For Schwab’s part, they have bumped up security in some major ways:

  • Whenever a new device is used to access a Schwab portal, a text or e-mail is sent (depending on how the security of the specific account is set-up), to ensure that fraudsters are not trying to access your account information electronically.
  • In addition, Schwab offers a security feature called two-factor authentication, which allows for an app on your phone to provide a six-digit code to follow your Schwab Alliance password, further ensuring that only the account holder can access their sensitive information.
  • Finally, one further security measure clients can choose to utilize is called Schwab Voice ID. With this service, a client calls in and answers some basic questions to the Schwab Alliance team, through which their Voice Biometrics system analyzes the quality of your voice. Then, if any suspicious activity occurs in your accounts, Schwab will call and verify the activity with you, using the Biometrics system to ensure that the voice on that end of the line is actually the account holder.

As far as DWM goes, our stance and determination in protecting our clients’ information remains resolute. We are completely committed to client security, and will continue to both provide education to keep our clients informed of rising threats, as well as keeping ourselves up-to-date about viral issues and staying abreast of any suspicious account behavior. For example, one of the most dangerous areas regarding theft and fraud currently going on are real estate scams. Hijackers will find a way into legitmate e-mail threads regarding wire information for a client buying property, and provide phony wire information. As a result, verbal verification is the new normal. As part of our safeguarding protocol, DWM will be calling the client and/or the title company to verify these wire instructions to ensure that everything goes as planned.

At DWM, we are passionate about protecting our clients and helping them shape their financial future, worry-free. This is seen throughout our wealth management process, from investing to account management, to financial planning. We aim to help clients notice and avoid any landmines that might be hiding in their long-term financial plan. Providing safer, more efficient ways of accessing and updating their accounts, while also actively monitoring for suspicious activity and ensuring accuracy is an effective method of doing so.

Please feel free to stay updated on Schwab’s technological advancements through their “Client Learning Center” page found here:

http://content.schwab.com/learningcenter/

Please also feel free to contact DWM with any questions or concerns regarding either advancements or safety.

At DWM, we are passionate about protecting our clients and helping them shape their financial future, worry-free. This is seen throughout our wealth management process, from investing to account management, to financial planning. We aim to help clients notice and avoid any landmines that might be hiding in their long-term financial plan. Providing safer, more efficient ways of accessing and updating their accounts, while also actively monitoring for suspicious activity and ensuring accuracy is an effective method of doing so.

HERE COME THE MILLENNIALS!

In only 12 years, 75% of American employees will be Millennials.  By then, even the last of the Baby Boomers will be 66 and on social security (though a few of us might still be working).  Generation X is a smaller cohort and some of its 54-65 year olds will already be retired.  The oldest Generation Zers will only be 34 at that time.   Yes, in 2030, the Millennials, aged 35 to 53, will be the backbone of the economy and country.

What an exciting time to be alive!  Can you imagine all the changes that may occur in the next 12 years?  Just consider that just 14 years ago Blockbuster Video had 9,000 stores and is now down to one last store in Oregon. 2004 was also the year Facebook was launched.

Yes, new reality can be exciting and challenging.  The Millennials bring with them their own expectations of life, work and values.  Those organizations and communities that embrace generational diversity will undoubtedly thrive in a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous future.

Jennifer Brown, author of “Reversing the Generation Equation: Mentoring in the New Age of Work,” indicates that Millennials “possess the most diverse attitudes, tendencies and requirements of any preceding generation and they are bringing that to work and life and demanding to be welcomed, valued, respected and heard.”  They’ve grown up with being in the center of the activity and expect to stay there.

The Pew Research Center’s “Millennials in Adulthood” takes a look at just how unique this generation is and how the social, political and economic realities in their formative years have shaped them.  Due to a disconnect between Millennials and many organizations not willing to meet them half-way, it’s no surprise that Millennials have experienced greater job dissatisfaction than Generation X and Baby Boomers.

A study conducted by Deloitte showed that 56% of Millennials have “ruled out working for a particular organization because of its values or standard of conduct.”  49% have declined a task assigned to them that was thought to go against personal values or rules of ethics.  According to the study, Millennials are seeking a good work/life balance (more than monetary compensation), their own homes, a partner, flexible working conditions and financial security.  Furthermore, this group does not necessarily defer to seniority as seen in previous generations. For them, respect must be earned.  Which brings us to the concept of “Reverse Mentoring.”

Jack Welch of GE was one of the early pioneers of reverse mentoring.  Twenty years ago, as technological changes were sweeping our country, Mr. Welch encouraged 500 top-level executives at GE to reach out to people younger than them to learn about the internet.  Since then, reverse mentoring has gone beyond technological learning and expanded into ideas, advice and insights.  Organizations such as PWC and AARP are among those who have launched programs.

At PWC, the young mentors are in their early 20s and have been working long enough to understand how it works and short enough to still have a fresh perspective.  The AARP Foundation created a Mentor Up program in 2013 where teens and young adults come together with older generations to keep them current and connected with the younger world.  The young mentor the older mentees on technology and health and fitness.  They also exchange Valentine’s Day cards.  In short, intergenerational connections were made, skills exchanged, understanding obtained and mutual respect and admiration were achieved.

At DWM, we have two excellent young team members; Grant Maddox in Charleston and Jake Rickord in Palatine.  We are just starting a reverse mentoring program at DWM where Grant and Jake will be the mentors and Brett, Jenny, Ginny and I will be the mentees.  Once a month, we set aside lunch time for the mentor to share a topic, theme or idea they are interested in sharing and to explain two-way learning opportunities.  We invest time to learn, get to know one another better and increase our trust and respect for each other.  We are also starting to dismantle the old paradigm that “seniority always knows best.”

Our goal is generational diversity and respect for all.  Yes, the Millennials are coming. And, yes, they come with the most diverse attitudes, tendencies and requirements of any preceding generation.  As they say in World Cup Champion France, “Vive la Difference.”

DWM 2Q18 MARKET COMMENTARY

‘Confusing’. If you look that word up in a dictionary, you’ll see something like “bewildering or perplexing” as its definition. Confusing could be a good way to describe the state of the market. On the one hand, you have a U.S. economy that may have come off one of its strongest quarters in years. On the other hand, there is continued threat of higher interest rates and a tumultuous trade war.

Before looking ahead, let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 2Q18:

Equities: Stocks were mixed in 2q18. Certain pockets did well whereas certain ones did not. For example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index was down 0.7% on the quarter and now in the red for the 2018 calendar year (-1.8%). The Dow’s multinational holdings are more prone to trade-related swings, whereas small caps*, up 7.8% for 2q18 & 7.7% YTD (Year-to-date as of 6/30/18), are not. Emerging stocks**, -8.0% 2q18 & -6.7% YTD, did not fare well. This brewing trade war between the U.S. and China, along with rising interest rates and the rising U.S. dollar, are causing many investors to flee from these so-called riskier areas. We think a good general proxy for global equities is represented by the MSCI AC World Index, which was up a modest 0.72% for the quarter, and now about flat (-0.2%) for the year.

Fixed Income: Yields continued to go up, boosted by the same concerns as last quarter: increasing expectations for growth and inflation in the wake of the recent $1.5 trillion tax cut. The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index, dropped a modest 0.16% for the quarter and now down 1.6% YTD. TheBarclays Global Aggregate Bond Index fell 2.8% (and now down 1.5% YTD) as emerging market bonds suffered for same reasons as mentioned above for emerging market equities.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, registered a +0.4% for 2q18 and now off only 1.3% for the year. Gold*** suffered, -3.5%, however REITs**** and MLPs† had nice quarter returns of 5.8 and 11.5%, respectively.

Like others, you may be thinking something like this right now: “Thank you for providing color on the various assets classes, but I’m still confused. How did a balanced investor fare overall? And where do we go from here?”

Overall, most balanced investors had modest gains for 2q18 and are pretty close to where they were when they started the year.

As for looking forward, we think the area causing the most confusion and uncertainty is the tariff trade war issue. A lot of this is political noise which has weighed down stock prices. What has been, or will be, enacted is quite different than what is being discussed. We are hopeful that the countries can eventually reach a compromise on trade.

In the meantime, the US economy is red hot, with GDP nearing 5.0% and unemployment levels near lows not last seen since 1969. The upcoming earnings season should be exquisite! But all of these positives get analysts worried that the economy may overheat. The Fed’s goal is to raise interest rates enough to keep enough pressure on the brakes of this economy to control inflation, but not too much where it comes to a screeching halt. That being said, inflation is a little bit above the Fed’s target level and as such we would expect to see the Fed continue to raise rates gradually, perhaps for the next 4 -5 quarters. They’ll most likely need to stop at some point as the economy cools when some of the Tax Reform stimulus wears off in the second half of 2019. It’s not an easy job.

“I’m still confused – should we be worried about a recession in the near future?” While we don’t see it happening any time soon, it definitely is an increased possibility, and at some point, will inevitably occur. The goal is to be prepared for it. Don’t let emotions get in the way. Stay diversified and stay invested. Trying to time the market is a losing proposition. A good wealth manager can help you stay disciplined.

The good news is that the next recession will most likely be milder than the last couple for a few reasons including the following:

  • Economies, both here and abroad, are simply more stable than in the past.
  • Valuations are fine today. The forward 12-month PE (Price-to-Equity Ratio) of the S&P500 is right in-line with its 25-yr average of 16.1. International stocks, as represented by the MSCI ACW ex-US Index are even cheaper, trading at a 13.0 forward PE.
  • The Fed certainly does not want another 2008 on its hands. They will continue to be friendly to market participants.

SP GRAPH EDITED

 

Still confused? Hopefully not. But if you are, talk to a wealth manager like DWM. If you look at antonyms for confusion, you will see words like “calm”, “peace”, and “happiness”. That’s what our clients want and what we seek to provide them.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

**represented by the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index

**represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index

***represented by the iShares Gold Trust

****represented by the iShares Global REIT

† represented by the UBS AG London BRH ETracs Alerian MLP ETF

At DWM, our job is wealth management. We look to help our clients secure their financial futures through comprehensive financial planning and prudent investment management. Today, I’d like to focus on the investment management part which adheres to our philosophy of protection first, growth second.

Some readers may be familiar with DWM’s approach to investment management. At its core, it starts with the identification of our clients’ goals and constraints. We do this by identifying their goals, risk tolerance, return objectives, income needs, time horizon, and other special requirements. As every client is unique, so is each client portfolio.

We then match the characteristics of their goals and constraints with a specific Asset Allocation mix tailored to them. For example, x% equities via the DWM Core Equity Portfolio, y% fixed income via the DWM Core Fixed Income Portfolio, and z% alternatives via the DWM Liquid Alternatives Portfolio.

But many of our readers may not know the logistics of building those three DWM exclusive portfolios. Here is a little bit of the secret sauce:

The three major asset classes of equities, fixed income, and alternatives are further broken down into subclasses, which also have different exposures, risks, and potential returns. For example, we divide the equity portfolio into different sectors and market capitalizations, as well as between domestic and foreign stocks. We also pay attention to value vs growth. Then, in the fixed income portfolio, we split out exposure into government debt, corporate debt, and international debt, while paying special attention to credit risk and duration.

From there, there are several ways to go about choosing the securities to fulfill the subclasses. Our affiliation with Charles Schwab & Co- and its investment platform which makes most of the public investment universe available to us, there are lots of securities – some great, some not so great – to choose from.We further filter by looking at the following:

  • What type of exposure do we want to have in that subclass (for example, is market-cap weighted okay or is better to use a different methodology like factor-weighting)?
  • Total price to own and trade that security (e.g. the Operating Expense Ratio “OER” and ticket charge if applicable)
  • Volume: does the security trade enough for our firm to take a position for our clients’ portfolios
  • Security vehicle (ETF or Mutual Fund): both come with different characteristics
  • How do the securities complement one another, keeping in mind that non-correlating assets maximize your diversification benefits

It should be noted that from a risk management perspective we aren’t big fans of individual stocks. In fact, we began phasing out the use of individual stocks within our DWM-managed portfolios over a decade ago. Why?

  1. Company-specific risk: When allocating percentages of your portfolio to individual stocks, you run the possibility of the company represented by said stock going bankrupt or having a similar setback that can greatly increase the overall risk of your portfolio.
  2. More diversification with low-cost mutual funds and exchange-traded funds: With MFs and ETFs, we can incorporate the exposures to different individual stocks in one bundle, without having to have the aforementioned company-specific risk.

As you can now see, a lot goes into building and maintaining a portfolio. Once the initial portfolio is established with the appropriate weights to various investment style exposures, it is anything but “set and forget”. These “weights” or allocations to asset classes and the underlying investment styles can significantly fluctuate and will need to be rebalanced. Or we may find that we want more or less exposure to a specific area and thus adjustments are needed. Furthermore, new products – some great, some not so great – come to the market every day. If we identify one that is potentially a better fit to our model and it passes our due diligence process, we will make changes accordingly, whereby we execute trades via our sophisticated channels.

In conclusion, portfolio management is constantly evolving. Ongoing education and research is paramount to a solid investment management practice. At DWM, we don’t take that responsibility lightly. Through diligence and care, we seek to help our investors make their money work harder by eliminating the unforeseen landmines in their portfolio. Diversification, low-cost mutual funds/ETFs, and consistent portfolio monitoring are wonderful tools that DWM implements to help accomplish this hefty task, and keep our clients on track to meeting their financial goals.