Ready for a quick quiz?

financial-literacy-quiz

Two-thirds of the world can’t pass this financial literacy test.  Can you?  You don’t need a calculator, just 3-5 minutes of time.

 

Risk Diversification: Suppose you have some money to invest.  Is it safer to put your money into one business, piece of real estate or investment or to put your money into multiple businesses or investments?

a)One business, piece of real estate or investment

b)Multiple businesses, pieces of real estate or investments

 

Inflation:  Suppose over the next 10 years, the cost of things you buy including housing, food, taxes and health care and all others double.  If your income also doubles, will you be able to buy less than you can buy today, the same as you can buy today, or more than you can buy today?

a)Less

b)The same

c)More

Mathematics: Suppose you need to borrow $100 for one year.  Which is the lower amount to pay back: $105 or $100 plus 3% interest?

a)$105

b)$100 plus 3% interest

Compound Interest:  Suppose you put money into a bank and the bank agreed to pay 3% interest per year to your account.  Will the bank add more money to your account in the second year than the first year, or will it add the same amount of money for both years?

a)The same

b)More

Compound Interest II:  Now suppose you have $100 to invest in a (very aggressive) bank who will pay you 5% interest per year.  How much money will you have in your account in 5 years if you do not remove any of the principal or earned interest from the account?

a)Exactly $125

b)More than $125

c)Less than $125

 

Pretty simple, right.  The answer is b for all.  We’re sure our regular DWM blog readers got them all right.

Across the world, however, the 150,000 people who took the test didn’t do so well.  Two-thirds of them answered at least 2 of the 5 questions incorrectly.  The survey pointed out some key findings.  Norway has the greatest share of financially literate people worldwide.  Canada, the UK, the Netherlands and Germany also finished in the top 10. The U.S. didn’t.

downloadIn the Emerging Market countries, like China, India, Brazil and Russia, the young people, ages 15 to 35 were the most financially literate.  Apparently the kids in Shanghai “knocked the cover off the ball” (just like George Springer of the Astros).

So, what’s the takeaway? Financial literacy for Americans could use improvement.  In addition, as we pointed out in our blog two weeks ago highlighting Nobel Prize winner Richard Thaler, people, even if they are financially literate, can make systematically irrational decisions.  This means you may need a financial coach and advocate.  That’s what we are for our DWM clients.  Whether it’s professional investment management, financial decisions and planning, income tax planning, insurance and estate planning matters, we provide our financial literacy, rational analysis and proactive solutions and suggestions.  It’s our expertise and our passion.  At DWM, this is how we hit home runs!

Nobel Prize Winner Helps Add $30 Billion to Retirement Accounts

Richard Thaler received the Nobel Prize in economics last week, principally by showing that people don’t always behave rationally and, in fact, we are systemically irrational.

Here’s an example: Two friends are given tickets to a basketball game in the Northeast.  The night of the game there is a tremendous snowstorm.  One friend calls the other and suggests there is no way they are going to the game now, in the snowstorm, and they don’t go.  But, he said “You know, if we had paid for those tickets ourselves, we’d be going.”

Studies by Dr. Thaler show that if the friends had paid for the tickets, they would likely driven through the snowstorm because they didn’t want to “lose” their money.  Classical economics would say that’s crazy, but it’s true.  People pay huge attention to “sunk costs,” often irrationally.

Because of Dr. Thaler and others, we know more about human biases and anomalies that impact our financial decisions. These include compartmentalizing (putting money in mental boxes), mental accounting (thinking differently about money in your pocket versus money in the bank) and the endowment effect (once you own something you value it more than before you owned it).

Dr. Thaler not only helped discover our biases but also identified ways to make irrational behavior work to our advantage.  Savings and retirement has always been a big area for him.  He applauds the fact that if we compartmentalize (have a “mental box”) for retirement savings we are doing a very good thing.  Putting money in a 401(k) plan makes it much “stickier” than other money and it stays there.

In 2004, Dr. Thaler and Shlomo Benartzi published “Save More Tomorrow.”  It is based on the idea that instead of asking people to save more now, ask them to save more in the future.   We tend to irrationally discount our future commitments.  Hence, we tend to put off savings because retirement is so distant, but we will commit to future savings because it is also so distant.  Dr. Thaler suggested that people save 50% of every raise.  No need to give up anything now.  And, this concept would mean that if you save 50%, then the remainder will be left for current spending, without any guilt.  Every raise therefore increases both spending and savings- a much more palatable idea than taking away some of our current income to save.

Over the past few decades, most company pension plans have been discontinued and replaced by company sponsored defined contributions plans, where employees needed to make contributions.  These voluntary accounts should have worked better.  Rational employees were expected to save and invest to meet their long-term goals.  But, it didn’t work that way-participation rates early on were very poor.   Dr. Thaler was asked about the problem and his response was that workers can be their own worst enemies- “without help, they’ll never retire.”

His solution: “Nudge” them into joining company retirement plans, using a concept known as automatic enrollment.  Rather than waiting for employees to complete paperwork, companies would automatically enroll them and workers, if they don’t want to be in, can opt out.

Last year, 58% of companies were automatically signing up workers. That’s up from 8% in 2000.  And some companies are automatically escalating the contributions or giving the employees the option to do so.  Thaler and Benartzi’s research shows, as compared to 2011 data, 15 to 16 million more people are saving.  Assuming an average contribution of $2,000 a year, that’s $30 billion a year in additional contributions.

Dr. Thaler, with his colleague Hersh Shiffrin, suggested that our mental accounting of money is often a battle in our brains between the “doer” (focused on short-term rewards) and the “planner” (focused on the long-term.)  How choices are presented to us (“the choice architecture”) makes a big difference in our decision.  Making enrollment in the 401(k) occur by default and requiring a worker to “opt out” will likely put the “planner” in control, not the “doer.”

One of our key jobs and challenges at DWM is to assist our clients by framing questions and choices in the appropriate way.  Like Dr. Thaler, we understand that wealth, health and happiness decisions are not always rational yet we do our best to find a way to “nudge” both your doer and planner parts of your brain in order to help protect and grow your assets and your legacy. We haven’t made a $30 billion impact yet, but we’re passionately working on it every day.

October: Halloween and National Cybersecurity Awareness Month

What a combo!  Ghosts and goblins seem pretty tame compared to the potential theft of our financial information.  146 million Americans got a big scare last month when Equifax announced that hackers had stolen their personal information.  Fast food chain Sonic just announced that customers’ debit and credit card information was stolen last week.  So, while Halloween costumes, haunted houses and trick or treats get put away on November 1st, cybersecurity issues cannot be put away in the attic trunk or tossed into the garbage.

We probably all wish we could just email Equifax a two word message:  “You’re Fired!”  Unfortunately, it’s not that easy.  For example, Fannie Mae, who sets the rules for most mortgages, requires information from all three credit “repositories.”   If you will never need a mortgage, you can try to delete your files from Equifax.  However, those who have tried have been put “on hold” for hours and then told that deletion of their files was impossible.  The “no” response to deletion was confirmed by Equifax former CEO Richard Smith last week to Congress. For now, the best we can do is freeze (not “lock”) our accounts at Equifax, Transunion and Experian.

New “cyber-vampires” are emerging from the darkness.  Did you ever watch the movie “Catch me if you can?” Great film.   It is the story of Frank Abagnale, Jr., played by Leonardo DiCaprio, a master of deception and a brilliant forger who stayed one step ahead of the FBI (Tom Hanks) for five years with his highly successful scams.  Once arrested, he spent five years in jail from age 21 to 26.  Since that time, Mr. Abagnale has put his unique skills to good use teaching FBI agents around the country about cybercrime, identity theft and fraud.    He also serves as an ambassador for AARP’s Fraud Watch Network and lives in Daniel Island, SC.  Here are some of Frank Abagnale’s (“FA”) recent warnings:

FA: “Stop writing checks- if you are still paying by check, you might be putting your life savings at risk.”  If you go into a grocery store and write a check, you have to hand the clerk the check with your name and address, phone number, your bank’s name and address, your bank account number, the bank routing number and your signature.  And then, the clerk may ask to write down your date of birth and driver’s license number as well.  You never get the check back, it goes to the store’s warehouse, where it may be destroyed thoroughly (or not) six months from now.  Anyone seeing the check has all they need to draft on your bank account tomorrow.

FA: “It is now 4,000 times easier to forge checks (with today’s technology).”  50 years ago, FA used a Heidelberg printing press, originally costing $1 million, to forge checks.  The press was 90 feet long and 18 feet high.  Now, one simply opens their laptop and says, “Who’s my victim today?”  In fact, FA indicates that forging checks is so easy these days that street gangs that used to deal in drugs and narcotics are forging checks instead.  FA: “It’s easier and you spend a lot less time in jail if you are caught.”

FA: “Technology breeds crime-whether it is forging checks or getting information.”  Facebook is a great source of information for the crooks.  One of the most common scams now is the “grandparents scam.”  The bad guys go on Facebook and find out who the grandparents are and see who the grandson is dating.  They easily manipulate their telephone caller ID to show a call coming from the NYPD or other police department.  The thieves place their call on a Friday night and tell the grandparents that the grandson is at the jail after being picked up for DUI/DWI and being held for bail.  If money for bail is not received in two hours, the grandson will have to spend the weekend in prison.  “Millions of grandparents have fallen for this scam.”

At DWM, we recognize that you have worked and continue to work very hard for your money.  Our goal, in every facet of providing Total Wealth Management, is to protect and grow your assets.  Cyber-safe practices are a key element of risk management.  Our first job is to educate our clients and friends about the importance of cybercrime, identity theft and fraud.  Charles Schwab & Company, the custodian for our clients’ money, is as dedicated as we are to keep you and your funds safe and help prevent attacks.

Watch for more blogs this month (and beyond) on cybersecurity.  It’s a tremendously important topic!!

“An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure”- B. Franklin

Millions of Americans are being impacted by two Category 5 disasters- Hurricane Irma and the Equifax data breach!!  Certainly, we’re all watching Irma spread through FL and our hearts and prayers are with all those in Irma’s path.  But don’t discount the Equifax high-tech heist as something small.  Last Thursday, Equifax announced that personal and confidential information for 143 million Americans.  This included names, social security numbers, birth dates, addresses and, in some instances, driver’s license numbers and other information.

This epic breach is a really big deal and a great concern.  Equifax, Experian and Transunion warehouse the most intimate details of Americans’ financial lives, from credit cards to medical bills.  Once security is breached, the hackers typically sell the stolen information to sophisticated identity thieves.  Last year, 15.4 million Americans were victims of identity theft, which totaled $16 billion.  In most cases, the money was recovered, but only after a tremendous amount of time, money and stress.  One man said the thieves so ruined his credit that he was unable to secure a needed mortgage refinance.  One lady’s social security number was used by others to file her income taxes and get a refund before she even filed her own return.  It took her over a year to get it straight with the IRS.  In the first half of 2017, there were a record 791 data breaches in the U.S., up 29% from last year.  Victims have recounted what a terrifying experience it is to have your identity stolen.  “You’re worried about the tremendous implications this could have and the possibility of it going on for years.”

Here’s the really bad part of the Equifax breach. We now know that the breach occurred six weeks ago, July 29th.  The hackers probably sold the information shortly thereafter.  We’ve likely all been compromised for six weeks and we didn’t know it.  Equifax is now under investigation for the breach and their lack of transparency by Congress, New York’s attorney general and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. If you call Equifax, it’s another frustration.  Their “hot line” is staffed with people who really can’t tell you if your information was taken or not.  You should assume that it was.  Ouch!!

It’s time for us to play defense.  Step one- put a credit freeze on all three reporting services immediately.  It’s your only hope.  A credit freeze prevents existing creditors and new creditors from using your information.  It prevents new accounts being opened in your name.  When you contact the sites listed below you will receive a PIN that allows you to temporarily lift or “thaw” your freeze.  Put that number in a very safe place (see below).  Yes, you may be delayed a day or two to get your information released when you need to apply for new credit, but that’s a small problem compared to potential identity theft.

Here are the sites:

Equifax – https://www.freeze.equifax.com/Freeze/jsp/SFF_PersonalIDInfo.jsp

Experian – https://www.experian.com/freeze/center.html

TransUnion – https://freeze.transunion.com/sf/securityFreeze/landingPage.jsp

I froze Elise and my accounts yesterday in about 20 minutes.

 

Step two-you need to create strong passwords and store them in a secure spot. The bad guys have two pieces of information, your social security number (which you don’t want to change) and your address.  Don’t help them with the next step by having weak passwords.

Updating your passwords will take some time.  Focus first on the key ones; your credit cards, financial institutions, and key retailers like Amazon and Apple; anywhere there is money or where thieves could get merchandise or services.  If a site offers additional security with a two-factor authentication, enable it.   Once you’ve got the key sites, start knocking out the others.

You should use a password manager like 1Password or LastPass.  It’s always important to update your password every so often. These sites create a unique random number password for every website you visit and stores them in a database that you create.  This makes it much more difficult for the thieves to decode your password. Further, these are great places for all of your passwords and your PINs.  Of course, you need to keep your master password in a special spot and share that with your spouse and/or another trusted person.

No question, this is a real pain!!  But, the alternative is possible identity theft which could be a 100 times worse.  We live in an age of Big Data.  We have all allowed the emergence of huge detailed databases full of information about us.  Thanks to technology, financial companies, tech companies, medical organizations, advertisers, insurers, retailers and the government can maintain and access this information.  Unfortunately, companies like Equifax are only lightly regulated and there’s not much punishment for breaches.  Hence, breaches will keep happening.  Even with new technology, like Apple’s new iPhone8 which includes face recognition to unlock it, the consumer credit bureaus are not going away anytime soon.

Please do yourself a favor and freeze your credit, change your passwords and store everything securely this week.  The process will certainly feel like more than an “ounce” of prevention, but if it saves you from identity theft, it will be far more than a “pound” of cure.

My, How Jobs Have Changed

Hope you had a super Labor Day weekend!  Wonderful to be with family and friends.  It’s amazing how jobs have changed over the years.  The NYT over the weekend illustrated how life is so much different for workers by comparing two janitors working for two top companies then and now.

Gail Evans was a janitor for Eastman Kodak in Rochester, NY almost forty years ago.  She was a full-time employee, received 4 weeks paid vacation, reimbursement for some tuition costs to go to college and bonuses. And, when the Kodak facility was temporarily closed, the company kept paying her and had her perform other work.  Ms. Evans took computer classes at night, got her college degree in 1987 and ultimately became chief technology officer for Kodak.

Marta Ramos cleans floors for Apple in Cupertino, CA.  She isn’t on Apple’s payroll. She works for one of Apple’s contractors.  Ms. Ramos hasn’t had a vacation in years-she can’t afford the lost wages.  Going back to school is out of the question. There are no bonuses and no opportunities for some other role at Apple.  Ms. Ramos earns $16.60 per hour, about the same as Ms. Evans did in inflation-adjusted terms.  But her only hope for advancement is to become a “team leader”, which pays an extra $.50 per hour.

Over the last 35 years, American corporations have increasingly focused on improving their bottom line by focusing on their core competency and outsourcing the rest. Part of the success of the Silicon Valley giants of today has come from their ability to attain huge revenues and profits with relatively few workers.  It’s led to huge profits for shareholders, helped grow the U.S. economy, but also has fueled inequality.

In 1993, three of the then tech giants – Kodak, IBM and AT&T – employed 675,000 employees to produce $243 billion of revenue in inflation-adjusted dollars.  Today, Apple, Alphabet and Google produce $333 billion in annual revenue with less than 1/3 of that number, employing only 205,000 employees.

Apple is quick to point out that its products generate many jobs beyond those who receive an Apple paycheck.  It estimates that 1.5 million people work in the “app economy.” However, research shows that the shift to a contracting economy has put downward pressure on compensation.  Many corporations hire full-time employees only for the most important jobs and outsource the rest; obtaining contractors at the time and place needed for the lowest price possible. It’s not just janitors and security guards that are outsourced.  There are also people who test operating systems, review social media posts and screen job applicants, for example.  It’s understandable: companies face really tough competition and if they don’t keep their work force lean, they risk losing out to a competitor that does.

In addition, outsourcing often results in a culture of transience.  Contracted workers are often changing jobs every 12 to 18 months, which obviously can be stressful to them and their family.  Contractors generally don’t receive stock options nor robust health insurance.  Also, retirement plans, even for full-time employees, have changed considerably in the last 35 years. In 1979, 28% of workers were covered by a company paid pension program and 7% had a 401(k). In 2014, only 2% of workers were covered by a pension plan and 34% had a 401(k) plan, which of course, means that most of the funding now is coming from the worker.

Here’s what’s really amazing.  With all these changes, job satisfaction has gone up.  For the first time since 2005, more than half of U.S. workers say they’re satisfied with their jobs.  This optimism has led to consumer spending increasing every month this year and a strong economy.  Apparently, after a decade of job cuts, minimal raises and reduced benefits, workers have lowered their expectations.  Rick Wartzman, author of “The End of Loyalty: The Rise and Fall of Good Jobs in America,” feels that young workers today “don’t even know what they are missing.”

On Monday, we celebrated Labor Day, honoring working people.  That’s particularly important these days as many workers don’t have it nearly good as it was 30-40 years ago.  Even so, American values, spirit and resiliency continue to be very evident in these ever-changing times. Perhaps we need another holiday, “Resilience Day.”  Time to get the grill heated up again!

“The Markets are going to Fluctuate”

Last Thursday, August 17, the equity markets took a hit of 1-1.5%.  In overall terms, it wasn’t a pullback (5% drop) or a correction (10%) yet some were concerned this might be the “start of the end” of the long-term bull market.  Yes, stock valuations have been high for some time, but many people wondered “Why now?” Various reasons were given to “explain” the causes of Thursday’s decline.  Let’s take a look at some of these:

“Terrorism.”  The first reports of the attack in Barcelona were posted in New York around noon last Thursday.  The markets were already in a decline and gold and bonds were moving higher.  Though the attack was dreadful and disgusting, it likely didn’t move the markets.

“Corporate America abandons the White House.”  Kenneth Frazier, CEO of Merck, resigned Monday, August 14.  Others followed and the major business councils disbanded on Wednesday, August 16.  However, participation on President Trump’s councils is voluntary and the first priority of each of the CEOs is their “day job,” which involves working with their customers, employees, suppliers and investors.  Their departure shouldn’t have been a surprise.

“All Donald Trump all the time has worn out people’s patience.”   Certainly, many may be exhausted by the almost singular focus of the news being the White House for the last seven months.  However, impatience is unlikely to cause the markets to move lower.  It was only two weeks ago that we all were worried about the possibility of a nuclear war starting in the Korean peninsula. And, that scare didn’t move the markets.  Therefore, it’s hard to believe the daily White House news would be a source of concern for the markets.

“The White House Economic Team is Leaving.”  Early last Thursday, a rumor floated through Wall Street that Gary Cohn, the Director of the National Economic Council, was resigning.  Mr. Cohn, along with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are leading the all-important tax reform and infrastructure initiatives.  The S&P 500 began a sharp move down around 10 am last Thursday exactly the time the false tweet came out.  Fortunately, the rumor was squelched almost immediately but the markets, nevertheless, continued to fall.   Hence, the rumor seems not to have been the catalyst for the sale, though the loss of either Mr. Cohn or Mr. Mnuchin would, in fact, be a major concern.

In short, these “explanations” given after last Thursday’s market drop really don’t identify why it happened.  Even so, story lines will continue.  We humans want them.  We are wired to try to understand why and how things happen and use that information to guide our future.

Legend has it that about a century ago, an alert young man found himself in the presence of John Pierpont Morgan, one of the most successful investors of all time.  Hoping to improve his fortune, the young man asked Mr. Morgan’s opinion as to the future course of the stock market.  The alleged reply has become a classic:  “Young man, I believe the market is going to fluctuate.”

Yes, there are many things we cannot control and, fortunately, some we can.  At DWM, we focus on helping you to create and maintain an investment portfolio that is designed to participate in good times and protect in bad times by:

  • Identifying and implementing a customized asset allocation based on your goals and risk tolerance
  • Diversifying the holdings by asset class and asset style
  • Using the lowest cost investments wherever possible
  • Striving to make the portfolio tax efficient
  • Rebalancing regularly
  • Staying fully invested
  • Providing discipline to keep you on track and, for example, making sure you are not trying to time the markets or chase performance

Yes, the markets are going to fluctuate.  We can’t control that.  But, at DWM we can help you control those key metrics that, over the long run, can produce higher expected returns with lower risk.

Let’s All Work to Grow Human Capital!

Your biggest financial asset may be your human capital.  Yes, perhaps even more important than your investment portfolio, house, real estate and other assets.  Simply put, human capital refers to the abilities and qualities of people that make them productive.  There are many factors that contribute to human capital.  Knowledge is the most important, but discipline, punctuality, willingness to work hard, personal values and the state of one’s health are among the other factors.

Generally, younger people will have more human capital than financial capital.  In an economic sense, their human capital is the net present value of their lifetime earnings.  In a larger sense, human capital is our ability to add value to others and improve their lives and, by doing so, improve our own.  Decisions young people make early on regarding their education, their careers, their job choices, life partner choice, etc. will all have huge impacts on their eventual financial capital and human capital. Key questions they should answer include “What is your passion?” “When are you at your best?” and “What allows you to engage your human capital at the highest level?”

Historically, the cross-over point where financial capital starts to exceed human capital occurs when one is in their 50s.  However, with people living longer or pursuing “encore” careers, human capital may remain a significant personal asset for octogenarians and beyond.  A perfect example is 86 year old Warren Buffet who is committed to growing human capital:  “Investing in yourself is the best thing you can do.  Anything that improves your own talents cannot be taxed or taken away from you.”  Regardless of your age, human capital is like a garden, you need to continually give it your time and effort in order for it to grow.

For decades after WWII, the G.I. bill and the American economy pushed workers to build skills and maximize their economic potential.  This was arguably the greatest period of shared prosperity in the history of capitalism.  Last week’s Economist featured an article about University of Chicago Nobel Prize winner Gary Becker’s concept of human capital. Dr. Becker found that 25% of the rise in per-person incomes from 1929 to 1982 in the U.S. was because of increases in schooling.  Other components included on-the-job training and better health.  Dr. Becker was fond of pointing to Asian economics, such as South Korea and Taiwan, with few natural resources, who have invested in human capital by building up their education systems.  There is no debate that well-educated populations have greater incomes and broader social gains. There is a debate over whether the government should supply the education or students should bear the cost; yet both will receive the rewards.

Dr. Becker also wrote about “good inequality” and “bad inequality.”  Higher earnings for doctors, scientists and computer programmers, for example, help motivate students to push harder and achieve top paying jobs.  On the other hand, Dr. Becker wrote, when inequality becomes too extreme, the schooling and even the health of children from poor families suffers, with parents unable to adequately provide for them.  Inequality of this sort “depresses human capital, leaving society worse off.”

Certainly, many, if not most, of our DWM blog readers are committed to increasing and using their human capital to benefit themselves and others.  But, there are many Americans who do not or cannot.  Some are in occupations that have been hit hard by technological changes, others are in declining industries, others have limited education, and others have little opportunity.  As a result, there are lots of unhappy people due to this huge current gap between full human capital and employed human capital.  Can you imagine our country where the vast majority of our 323 million people were increasing their human capital and using it to benefit themselves and society?  Can you imagine an annual economic growth rate of GDP of 5-10%, like it was in the 60s and 70s, compared to the 2% it is currently?  Can you imagine hundreds of millions of Americans happy with their shared prosperity and with optimism for the future?

Let’s make growing human capital a lifetime commitment. And, let’s also commit to using our human capital to help others grow theirs.  It’s up to each of us. Mahatma Gandhi put it so well: “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”

Next on the Agenda- Income Tax

Washington is moving on to tax reform. Earlier this week, the Senate Republicans made it clear that they want to focus on tax overhaul and critical fiscal legislation.  Republicans and Democrats have already outlined their plans.  Income taxes have always been a very important and often contentious subject. Before we review the key issues, let’s step back and review tax policy generally.

I remember my first tax class in Champaign, Illinois over 50 years ago.  We learned that income tax policy was more than simply raising money.  Taxes have always been an instrument of economic and social policy for the government, as well.

Income taxes became a permanent part of life in America with the passage of the 16th Amendment in 1913.  The first tax amount was 1% on net personal incomes above $3,000 with a surtax of 6% on incomes above $500,000 (that’s about $9 million of income in today’s dollars).  By 1918, at the end of WWI, the top rate was 77% (for incomes over $1 million).  During the Great Depression, the top marginal tax rate was 63% and rose to 94% during WWII.  The top rate was lowered to 50% in 1982 and eventually 28% in 1988.  It slowly increased to 40% in 2000, was reduced again from 2003 to 2012 and now is back at 40%. Corporate tax rates are 35% nominally, though the effective rate for corporations is between 20% and 25%.

Changes in the tax structure can influence economic activity.  For example, take the deduction for home mortgage interest.  If that deduction were eliminated, the housing market would most likely feel a big hit and economic growth, at least temporarily, would likely decline.  In addition, an argument is often made that tax cuts raise growth.  Evidence shows it’s not that simple.  Tax cuts can improve incentives to work, save and invest for workers, however, they may subsidize old capital that may undermine incentives for new activity and growth.  And, if tax cuts are not accompanied by spending cuts or increased economic growth, then the result is larger federal budget deficits.

Our income tax system is a “progressive” system.  That means that the tax rate goes up as the taxable amount increases.  It is based on a household’s ability to pay.  It is, in part, a redistribution of wealth as it increases the tax burden on higher income families and reduces it on lower income families.  In theory, a progressive tax promotes the greater social good and more overall happiness.  Critics would say that those who earn more are penalized by a progressive tax.

So, with that background, let’s look at some of the key issues.

The Republicans and the White House outlined their principles last Thursday:

  • Make taxes simpler, fairer, and lower for American families
  • Reduce tax rates for all American businesses
  • Encourage companies to bring back profits held abroad
  • Allow “unprecedented” capital expensing
  • Tax cuts would be short-term and expire in 10 years (and could be passed through “reconciliation” procedures by a simple majority)
  • The earlier proposed border adjustment tax on imports has been removed

Also this week, Senate Democrats indicated an interest in working with Republicans if three key conditions are met:

  • No cuts for the top 1% of households
  • No deficit-financed tax cuts
  • No use of fast-track procedures known as reconciliation

The last big tax reform was 1986.  It was a bipartisan bill with sweeping changes.  Its goals were to simplify the tax code, broaden the tax base and eliminate many tax shelters.  It was designed to be tax-revenue neutral.  The tax cuts for individuals were offset by eliminating $60 billion annually in tax loopholes and shifting $24 billion of the tax burden from individuals to corporations.  It needed bipartisan support because these were permanent changes requiring a 60% majority vote.

With all that in mind, sit back, relax and follow what comes out of Washington in the next few months. It will be interesting to watch how everything plays out for tax reform, the next very important piece of proposed legislation.

Some Cures for Procrastination

While most of us are having a super summer, maybe traveling a little bit, maybe kicking back a little, 60 psychologists were in Chicago last week attending the 10th Procrastination Conference. Their goal:  to better understand who procrastinates and discuss how the dreaded loop of perpetual delay can be altered.

Amazing.  20% of people are true procrastinators.  It seems of all countries surveyed, including the U.S., to Poland, Britain, Germany, Japan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and Peru, all have about 1 in 5 residents who are chronic procrastinators, or “procs.”  They delay in completing a task to the point of experiencing subjective discomfort, such as anxiety or discomfort.  A proc is usually consistent; procrastinating in multiple areas of her or his life- work, personal, financial and social.  Procs often lose jobs, have broken marriages, suffer deflated dreams, have self-esteem issues and are in financial disarray. Procrastination can be a real problem.

Hopefully, though, we have none or only few chronic procs in our readership.  However, for those who are in the other 80% who “on occasion” delay making decisions until it is too late, find themselves saying “I’ll do it tomorrow,” putting things off until the last minute or simply neglecting important items, here are some ideas on ways to get more things done.

  • Begin by forgiving yourself for being a part-time procrastinator.
  • Break down tasks into smaller pieces. For example, “select your blog topic,” as opposed to “write the blog.”
  • Consider using the Pomodoro technique. Plan your day in 25 minute intervals with a 5 minute break after each.  Complete small tasks throughout the day which will produce a huge cumulative effect and a wonderful feeling of accomplishment.
  • Adopt the “Seven Minute Rule.” If you have a task that requires seven minutes or less, just get it done now.  No need to put it on a to-do list or waste energy thinking about it over and over again, just knock it out.
  • Minimize distractions. One key area is emails.  Consider being email free for 15-25 minutes at a stretch to be able to concentrate and complete a project rather than getting sidetracked every other minute.
  • Deal with problems now. Remember the following saying:  “If you have to swallow a toad, it’s best not to look at it too long.”
  • Seek external help for your goals.

It’s no surprise that many people procrastinate on getting their financial matters in order.  Making decisions for what happens to your estate when you die isn’t all that much fun.  Reviewing insurance coverage for when your house is destroyed or your dog bites your neighbor isn’t extremely enjoyable.  Income tax planning isn’t a bowl of cherries.  Planning for retirement and making choices about needs, wants and wishes is not like having a birthday party.  Trying to make investment decisions by yourself with so much information available and so many  conflicting, self-proclaimed “experts” is difficult and frustrating.

However, all of these items are very important and do need to be put in order. Wealth management is one of those key areas where seeking external help can break your procrastination and help you reach your goals.  Consider working with a full-service fee-only fiduciary like DWM.  Not only will you get an experienced, competent team to guide you and provide information and choices so you can make decisions on all aspects of your finances.  In addition, with firms like DWM, who have a proprietary and prudent process in place, you receive regular, consistent follow-up on all investment, financial planning, insurance, income taxes and estate planning matters for years to come.

So, don’t procrastinate.  Consider some of these ideas for getting more things done. And, if you need external help on your finances in order, please give us a call.

“American Spirit and Values”

David McCullough, Pulitzer Prize winning historian has a new book.  “The American Spirit,” is a compilation of speeches Mr. McCullough has made over the last 25 years.  His hope is to “remind us, in this time of uncertainty and contention, of just who we are and what we stand for, of the high aspirations of our founders and of our enduring values.”   Our country has always stood for opportunity, vitality and creative energy, fundamental decency, insistence on truth, and good-heartedness to one another.

However, much of what we read in the papers these days belies our American values.  Today, let’s look at two key areas- corporate America and Washington- that require substantial improvement.

First, let’s talk about today’s problem of big business focusing solely on “maximizing shareholder value.”  The result has been an almost Dickens-like atmosphere for consumers and employees. Turning airplanes into cattle cars is a good example.  We all saw the United passenger dragged off the flight in April.  United used to have a bonus program for executives based on on-time arrivals, consumer satisfaction and profit.  It doesn’t now- it’s only based on pretax income and cost savings.  Same thing for American Airlines.  After years in Chapter 11, AAL came out of bankruptcy by merging with US Airways in 2013.  Earlier this year, after finally making a profit, management awarded its long underpaid flight attendants and pilots with a raise to bring them to industry levels of compensation. Wall Street “freaked out” that some potential shareholders earnings were being diverted and AAL’s stock price tanked.

Wal-Mart doesn’t want that to happen to them. Seven Walton family members (with a net worth of $130 billion) own ½ of WMT.  In 2015, WMT made $14.7 billion and shareholders got $10.4 billion in dividends and stock repurchases. WMT’s “low, low prices” are in part made possible by low, low wages for its 1.5 million employees. Many full-time WMT employees live in poverty, without enough money to pay for an apartment, buy food, or get basic health care. And, each year, we taxpayers pay $153 billion to pay for food stamps and other welfare programs for low paid employees, with WMT employees receiving about $7 billion of it.  WMT’s CEO made $21.8 million last year. The median annual pay for CEOs of the S&P 500 companies is now $11.7 million.

The real issue with low wages is the impact on the overall economy.  One company’s workers are another company’s customers.  Profitable companies could pay workers more and shareholders less, leading to more spending on products and services from other companies. This is turn could increase the revenue and profits of the overall economy.  Treating employees more fairly, giving them more opportunity and training is good for America and the economic growth and happiness of our country.  Focusing on making super products and providing excellent customer service are great.   Those aspects of capitalism are good for American.  The greed and selfishness parts are not.

Which brings us to Washington.  In less than five months, President Trump has transformed us from leaders of the free world to whiny bullies.  He pulled us out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, refused to reaffirm the mutual defense commitment to NATO and abandoned the voluntary Paris climate accord.  Here’s how Mr. Trump’s national security adviser, Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster described the President’s world view:  “The world is not a ‘global community’ but an arena where nations, nongovernmental actors and businesses engage and compete for advantage.”

Really?  Is it all about self-interest? What happened to the more cooperative, rules-based vision that motivated America and its allies since WWII?  Our leadership was good for the world and has been good for our country.  A world of cutthroat competition and zero-sum outcomes is not.

On the domestic side, the House passed the Financial Choice Act (FCA) last week.  Very disappointing.   This legislation would replace the post 2008 financial crisis Dodd-Frank regulations, designed to protect Americans.   FCA would repeal the “Volker Rule,” which restricts banks from certain types of trading, and would strip the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau of its power to write rules and supervise investment firms (particularly regarding deceptive practices and consumer complaints.)  This, like the Health Care Choice Act and proposed tax reform, is just another Congressional attempt to give Wall Street and the top 1% unfair advantages so they can keep making more money at the expense of most Americans.

History can be a strength and an inspiration- it reminds us who we are and what we stand for.  Certainly, let’s make America Great, but let’s do it the right way- working together and providing opportunities for all 321 million Americans to reach their full potential. Let’s move away from the toxic polarization, greed and selfishness we see every day and get back to the high aspirations of our founders; cooperation, vitality, energy, basic truth and decency.  And, yes, let’s “Make Our Planet Great Again” and work with almost 200 countries worldwide to mitigate global warming.  We 7.5 billion citizens of the world are all in this together, hopefully for centuries and centuries to come.  Finally, let’s remember and promote our American Spirit and Values.