Financial Literacy: Money Matters!

As you all know, we provide proactive financial advice on matters such as investment management and value-added services such as tax planning, risk management and estate planning to name a few.  Something you probably didn’t know is that earlier this year, we launched a campaign to promote financial literacy for children and young adults!  It is called the Young Investors program.  Some of our clients have recently become the first recipients of this new program!

Financial literacy is a person’s ability to recognize and use the money and other resources he or she has to get what is needed and wanted.  Another way of saying this is that financial literacy is being able to set goals for using financial resources, make plans, and use the plans to meet financial demands and achieve goals.  To achieve financial literacy, a person needs to have experiences with money.  That is why it is important that children begin to learn about money and its use when they are young.

You might not know this, but financial literacy availability for young children is scarce, primarily because the school systems lack time and budget resources to incorporate financial education into the curriculums.  In fact, only 16 states require any instruction in economics between Kindergarten and 12th grade.  Even worse, only 7 states require students to take courses in personal finance.

There’s been a greater awareness of this educational need in the past 10 years and some financial-literacy advocacy groups have begun to take some steps to fill this educational void.  Some have responded by offering summer camps to young children whose parents want to teach their children the basics of money management.  Feedback from many of the attendees is that, believe it or not, they had fun!  Of course, we want to join in on the fun, and we are also excited to be a part of the solution.

We know that a financial foundation is best achieved when started early, reviewed, as well as reinforced often.  It’s important to teach young children even before they are in school about the concept of money, and that it’s not all about spending!  For example, something simple that a parent can start as early as age 3 can have lasting effects for the future.  Consider this:

Activity: Tell your toddler that you’ll give him a cookie now if he wants it, but you’ll give him two cookies if he waits an extra ten minutes. See what he chooses and try to encourage him to wait for the extra cookie.

Lesson Learned: Be patient and wait for a bigger payoff, rather than always going for instant gratification.

Although it might not look like much, it sets the stage for a less impulsive, more thoughtful response, and hopefully not just one involving money in the future!

Thinking about the scenario above, in an article I read the other day from the Wall Street Journal on personal finance summer camps, a 12 year old boy cited some camp attendance takeaways such as stopping and pausing before making purchases and long term planning!  I suppose it’s true that small things do matter!  And more interesting feedback from the camp directors is that many children ages 10-14 didn’t know what stock and bonds were.  Some thought the investments were a form of real estate.  Clearly, more attention needs to be given to this area.

We love the opportunities these summer camps offer and hope to provide some of our own financial education to our client families year round.  With our financial literacy agenda, our Young Investor program is structured with several tiers of age appropriate interactions and dialogue starters on financial matters for our clients to have with their children or grandchildren.  Age appropriate financial suggestions, tools, links to pertinent financial articles and fun activities to engage their minds are some of the content we will be sharing.  With the importance of starting as early as possible, we literally start at the very beginning, with newly born children/grandchildren, and capture all ages through the early 20s.  Specifically, we break out the tiers in roughly 5 year intervals, so age 0-5 years is the first group, 5-10 years is next, then 10-15 years, with 15-20ish years being the last group.  Our goal is that by age 25, the child or grandchild will be more than ready to begin a lifetime of investing!

Even after your children and grandchildren start their careers, it is our hope that they will join our Emerging Investor program, where they can establish their own brokerage accounts with Charles Schwab and have some of the same great DWM advantages and services as their parents and grandparents.  We are happy to help them by protecting and growing a diversified portfolio to preserve assets and provide moderate growth with minimal risk.

With our help, the young children of today will come to ask for financial assistance and have some of the best mentors in their lives, YOU!  And we all know that money is not an elective in life, so let’s keep the dialogue going with our young generation and keep providing them with good ‘sense’!  We hope you find this program to be a valuable experience.  As always, please let us know your thoughts or if you need financial assistance with a young investor in your life.

Tick, Tock… Is it Time for your Required Minimum Distribution (RMD)?

“Time flies” was a recent quote that I heard from a client.  Remember a long time ago…putting money aside in your retirement accounts, perhaps at work in a qualified traditional 401(k) or to an individual retirement account (IRA)?  It’s easy to ‘forget’ about it because, it was after all, meant to be used many years down the road.  It would be nice to keep your retirement funds indefinitely; unfortunately, that can’t happen, as the government wants to eventually collect the tax revenue from years of tax deferred contributions and growth.

In general, once you reach the age of 70 ½, per the IRS, many of those qualified accounts are subject to a minimum required distribution (RMD) and you must begin withdrawing that minimum amount of money by April 1 of the year following the year that you turn 70 1/2.  Of course, there are a few exceptions with regards to qualified accounts, but as a rule, when you reach 70 ½, you must begin taking money from those accounts per IRS guidelines if you own a traditional 401(k), profit sharing, 403(b) or other defined contribution plan, traditional IRA, Simple IRA, SEP IRA or Inherited IRA.  (Roth IRAs are not required to take withdrawals until the death of the owner and his or her wife.)  Inherited IRAs are more complicated and handled with a few options available to the beneficiary, either by taking lifetime distributions or over a 5 year period.  The importance here, is to be aware that a distribution is needed.  Another word of caution…In some cases, your defined contribution plan may or may not allow you to wait until the year you retire before taking the first distribution, so review of the terms of the plan is necessary.  In contrary, if you are more than a 5% owner of the business sponsoring the plan, you are not exempt from delaying the first distribution; you must take the withdrawal beginning at age 70 1/2, regardless if you are still working.

The formula for determining the amount that must be taken is calculated using several factors.  Basically, your age and account value determine the amount you must withdraw.  As such, the December 31 prior year value of the account must be known and, second, the IRS Tables in Publication 590-B, which provides a life expectancy factor for either single life expectancy or joint life and last survivor expectancy, needs to be referenced.  The Uniform Lifetime expectancy table would be referenced for unmarried owners and the Joint Life and Last Survivor expectancy table would be used for owners who have spouses that are more than 10 years younger and are sole beneficiaries.  It comes down to a simple equation: The account value as of December 31 of the prior year is divided by your life expectancy.  For most of us, your first RMD amount will be roughly 4% of the account value and will increase in % terms as you get older.

It all begins with the first distribution, which will be triggered in the year in which an individual owning a qualified account turns 70 ½.  For example, John Doe, who has an IRA, and has a birthdate of May 1, 1947, will turn 70 ½ this year in 2017 on November 1.  A distribution will need to be made then after November 1, because he will have needed to attain the age of 70 ½ first.  Therefore, the distribution can be taken after November 1 (for 2017), and up until April 1 of the following year in 2018.

Once the first distribution is withdrawn, subsequent annual RMDs need to be taken for life, and are due by December 31.  In this case, John Doe will need to next take his 2018 distribution, using the same formula that determined his first distribution.  This will become a regular obligation of John’s each year.

So, we’ve talked about who, what, why and when, now let’s talk about the where.  Once the distribution amount is calculated, an individual can then choose where he or she would like that money to go.  Depending on circumstances, if the money is not needed for living expenses, it is advised to keep the money invested within one of your other non-qualified accounts such as a Trust or Individual account, i.e. you can elect to make an internal journal to one of your other brokerage accounts.  Alternatively, if you have another thought for the money, you can have it moved to a personal bank account or mailed to your home.  Keep in mind that these distributions, like any distribution from a traditional IRA, are taxed as ordinary income, thus, depending on your income situation, you may wish to have federal or state taxes withheld from the distribution.  At DWM, we can help our clients determine if, and what amount, to be withheld.

Another idea for the money could be a qualified charitable distribution (QCD).  Instead of the money going into one of your accounts, a direct transfer of funds would be payable to a qualified charity.  There are certain requirements to determine whether you can make a QCD.  For starters, the charity must be a 501 (c)(3) and eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions, and, in order for a QCD to count towards your current year’s RMD, the funds must come out of your IRA by the December 31 deadline.  The real beauty about this strategy is that the QCD amount is not taxed as ordinary income.

It may be pretty scary to know how quickly time flies, but with DWM by your side, we can take the scare out of the situation!