DWM 1Q19 Market “MADNESS” Commentary

In basketball, March Madness is a big deal. For those of you who aren’t familiar with the term, March Madness refers to the time of the annual NCAA college basketball tournament, generally throughout the month of March. In the market, it may appear that “Madness” is never confined to any one month. If you really want to talk about Madness, just think about the last 6 months: The S&P500 was at an all-time high late September, only to throw up an “airball” and bottom out almost 20% lower three months later on worries that the Fed was raising rates too fast, only to “rebound” to have its best first quarter since 1998 as the Fed shifted its tone to a more dovish nature. Is it the NCAA or the markets in a “Big Dance”?!?

Yes, the investing environment now is so much different than our last commentary. Then, it certainly felt like a flagrant foul after a tenacious 4q18 sell-off that had gone too far. We advised our readers then to essentially do nothing and stay the course. And once again, rewards come to those that stay disciplined. With the market back within striking distance of its peak, it almost feels like its “cutting down the net” time. (“Cutting down the net” refers to the tradition of the winning basketball team cutting down the basketball net and giving pieces to team members and coaches.) But of course, the game of investing is not just four quarters like basketball. Investing can be a lifetime. So if you’re thinking about your portfolio like you would a basketball team, let’s hope its more like the Chicago Bulls of the 90s and not the 2010s! (Where’d you go, Michael Jordan?!?)

Like the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tourney, your portfolio holdings are probably like some of the best out there. But there will always be some winners and losers. Let’s take a look at how the major asset classes fared to start 2019:

Equities: The S&P500 soared to a 13.7% return. Small caps* did even better, up 14.6%. Even with a challenging Eurozone environment, international stocks** climbed over 10%. In basketball terms, let’s just say that this was as exciting as a SLAM DUNK for investors! Of course, with a bounce-back like this, valuations are not as appealing as they were just three months ago. For example, the S&P500 now trades at a 16.4x forward PE vs the 16.2x 25-year average.

Fixed Income: With the Fed taking a more dovish stance, meaning less inclined to raise rates, yields dropped and thus prices rose. The total return (i.e. price change plus yield) for most securities in fixed income land were quite positive. In fact, the Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index & the Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index jumped 2.9% and 2.2%, respectively. Further, inflation remained under control and we don’t expect it to be a pain-point any time soon. But TIME OUT!: Within the last several weeks we have seen conditions where the front end of the yield curve is actually higher than the back end of the yield curve. This is commonly referred to as an “inverted yield curve” and has in the past signaled falling growth expectations and often precedes recessions. To see what an inverted yield curve means to you, please see our recent blog.

Alternatives: Most alternatives we follow had good showings in 1Q19 as evidenced by the Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, up 3.9%. Two big winners in the space were Master Limited Partnerships***, up 17.2%, and Real Estate****, up 15.2%. The pivot by the Fed in terms of their attitude toward rates really benefited the real estate space as new home buyers are now seeing mortgage rates almost a point lower than just several months ago. Unfortunately, not all alts did as well. Gold barely budged. And managed futures†, down 3.1%, were tripped up by the last six-month whipsaw.

So if you think of your asset classes as players on a basketball squad, one could say that pretty much every one had a good game, but the star of the show was definitely “LeStock”. Moreover, there was no buzzer beater necessary this quarter, as your team flat out won. In fact, most balanced investors after just one quarter are up high single-digits! A definite nice start to the year. You have now advanced to the next round, but where does your team go from here?

The game we saw in the first quarter cannot continue. With the Tax Reform stimulus starting to wear off, economic growth has to decelerate. In fact, companies in the S&P500 are expected to report a 4% decline in 1Q19 vs 1Q18; their first decline since 2016! World trade volume has really slowed down, so there’s a tremendous focus on a US-China trade agreement happening – if not, watch out! The good news is that the Fed seems to be taking a very market-friendly position, and unemployment and wage growth are under control.

As always, there are risks out there. But with the bull market on the brink of entering its 11th year of economic expansion, the end-of-the-game buzzer need not be close as long as you have a good coach at the helm. Just like within NCAA basketball, to succeed, you need a good coach on the sidelines – someone like Tom Izzo of the Michigan State Spartans who always seems to get his players to work together and play their best. The same way a wealth manager like DWM can help you put the portfolio pieces and a financial plan together for you in an effort to thrive and succeed.

So don’t wind up with a busted bracket. If you want a lay-up, work with a proven wealth manager and you’ll be cutting down your own nets soon enough. Now that’s a “swish”!

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

*represented by the Russell 2000

**represented by the MSCI AC World Index Ex-USA

***represented by the Alerian MLP ETF

****represented by the iShares Global REIT ETF

†represented by the Credit Suisse Managed Futures Strategy Fund

Ask DWM: Should I Consider Investing in Marijuana?

In 1996, California became the first state to legalize the use of medical marijuana. This began, for many, the first opportunity to legally invest in this industry. In 2012, both Colorado and Washington State legalized the use of recreational marijuana. Both events were monumental for the development of marijuana investments but, arguably, the most momentous day in marijuana investments occurred on October 17th, 2018 with the legalization of recreational marijuana in Canada. In June of 2018, Canada voted “yes” to legalization and became the first major country to do so. Interest in these investments have soared ever since.

Cannabidiol (“CBD”) is one of the major attractions in this story. CBD is a cannabis compound used primarily for medical purposes. CBD has been proven to provide benefits for pain management, sleep aid, and stress. The primary difference between marijuana and CBD is its lack of hallucinogenic properties. CBD does not contain tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”), the main hallucinogenic property found in marijuana. CBD is currently legal in all 50 states. As of February 2019, marijuana has been legalized in over 30 US states for medical purposes and ten, including Washington D.C., have approved it for recreational use.

Spending in the legal marijuana industry is expected to surge from $8.5 billion in 2017 to over $23 billion in 2022. As a side note and for comparison purposes, illegal sales of pot represented 87% of all North American sales and over $46 billion in 2016 according to Arcview Market Research. Hard to not get excited about those growth figures! Further, in a sign of credibility to the industry, major investments from some of the world’s largest beverage makers including Coca-Cola and Corona brewer Constellation Brands have created even more hype and have sent some pot stocks soaring. It’s not just Wall Street taking notice, but ordinary people are wondering if they should get in on the craze.

But just like Bitcoin & other cryptocurrencies, this upstart legal cannabis industry has many red flags and may lead to some scary results.

First off, “FOMO” or the Fear Of Missing Out is no reason to plow good money into a speculative area. It is prudent to do some serious research before dipping into the waters of an industry that faces many legal, regulatory and other hurdles. Further, beware of fraudsters on the internet claiming “this pot stock is the next big thing!” Investing in cannabis is like the wild, wild west and similar to the dot.com mania of the 90s with tons of extreme volatility and broken promises.

More specifically, there are a variety of risks associated with investing in this area. Marijuana is still not legal at the Federal level, which makes banking for marijuana companies within the US difficult and future issues uncertain. Second, most marijuana companies are considered “start-ups” where company revenues are low or nil, and they may be running at a loss. In addition to this, overall investments in marijuana continue to remain small, albeit growing, in comparison to developed industries. For example, the ETFMG Alternative Harvest ETF (symbol: MJ), one of the largest marijuana funds available, holds just $1 billion in capital. Lastly, with only a handful of well-known “reputable” companies in this area, don’t get burned by loading up in just one or two names and thus becoming subjected to company-specific risk.

If you are still interested in investing in marijuana, there are a few considerations to keep in mind. As a general rule, you should not allocate more than a couple percent of your total investment portfolio to one company name. Further, prudent portfolio management suggests to limit your overall exposure to a speculative area like this to no more than 5% of your total investable assets. Avoid concentrated company-specific risk and diversify. A diversified mutual fund or ETF like the ETFMG Alternative Harvest ETF (symbol: MJ) mentioned above is a great choice for those that aren’t good at research but “have to get in”…

At the end of the day, investments in marijuana should be considered widely speculative and highly susceptible to losses. Volatility in both specific companies and funds have been extremely high since their inception. Investments in these areas should be considered more like taking your money to Las Vegas. It’s a gamble and you could potentially lose your entire investment.

At DWM we consider ourselves to be financial advocates for our clients and we love being a part of all of our client’s financial decisions. Questions such as investments in marijuana have been a reoccurring theme as of late, eerily similar to those in 2017 about Bitcoin and we know what happened there….In other words, if you are still interested in this area, PROCEED WITH CAUTION!!!

At this time, DWM is not investing in marijuana for managed accounts due to the many issues mentioned above. For clients still interested in reviewing marijuana investments via a self-directed/unmanaged account, we welcome your calls.

DWM 4Q18 & YEAR-END MARKET COMMENTARY

Fantasy Football and portfolio management may be more similar than one would think. Over the past weekend, I drafted a playoff fantasy football team which I’m hoping will amass more points than the other five “owners” in my league. Fantasy football drafting for both the regular season and playoffs is similar in that you want to take the NFL players that get the most touchdowns and the best stats in turn for rewarding you with higher points. The team with the most collective points wins! However, playoff fantasy drafting is much different than a regular season fantasy draft, with the key difference being one doesn’t know how many games that a player will actually play! Patrick Mahommes may be the best player available per game on paper; but if his KC Chiefs lose in their first game, a middle-of-the-road player like Julian Edelman from the Patriots who is expected to play multiple games, can be superior. Thus, the key is trying to pick not only the best available player, but also the one who will play the most games.

It’s sort of like investing, where picking NFL players and their teams become synonymous with picking companies. You want a collective bunch of players/securities that outperform others which ultimately leads to higher values. I looked at this draft pool of players like I would constructing a portfolio: diversifying my picks by player positions and teams.

Some of the other owners didn’t follow this disciplined approach, instead opting at throwing all of their marbles into the fate of one team and hoping it would lead them to the Fantasy Football Holy Land. And just like investing all or the majority of your dollars into one stock, this type of “coaching” can lead to utmost failure. Case in point: one owner loaded up on one team, taking several players on the Houston Texans. Ouch. (If you’re an NFL fan, you know that the Texans were squashed by the Colts and are out of the playoffs, just like this “owner” is now out of contention in our Fantasy League!) The morale of this story is: there is no silver bullet in football or investing; stay disciplined and diversified and reap the rewards over the long term.

And now onto the year-end market commentary…

Unfortunately, there were not many good draft picks this year. In fact, as stated in one of our previous blogs, around 90% of asset styles were in the red this year. And I don’t mean the Red Zone! Let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 4q18 and calendar year 2018:

Equities: Stocks were driving down the field, reaching record highs right before the 4th quarter began and then…well, let’s just say: “FUMBLE!” with the MSCI AC World Index & the S&P500 both dropping over 13%! This was the steepest annual decline for stocks since the financial crisis. Yes, investors were heavily penalized in 4Q18 for several infractions, the biggest being:

  • The slowing of economic growth
  • The ongoing withdrawal of monetary policy accommodation, i.e. the Fed raising rates and until recently, signaling more raises to come
  • Trade tensions continuing to escalate
  • The uncertainty of a prolonged US Government shut-down
  • Geopolitical risk

None of these risks above justify the severe market sell-off, which brought the MSCI AC World Index to a -10.2% return for 2018. This is in stark contrast to 2017, when it was up 24.0%! “Turnover!” Frankly, the stock market probably overdid it on the upside then and now has overdone it to the downside.

Fixed Income: The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index & the Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index “advanced the ball” in the fourth quarter, up 1.6% and 1.2%, respectively. Still, it wasn’t enough to produce any “first downs” with the US Agg essentially flat and the Barclays Global down 1.2% on the year. Bad play: In December, the Fed raised rates another quarter-point and indicated they may do more. Good play: within the last week, they may have completed the equivalent of a “Hail Mary” by signaling a much more dovish stance – it certainly made the stock market happy, now up 7 out of the last 9 days at the time of this writing.

Alternatives:  Like an ordinary offense playing against the mighty Chicago Bears D, alts were “sacked” in the fourth quarter as evidenced by the Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, falling 4.0% for the quarter and finishing the year down 5.1%. This is the worst showing ever for this alternative benchmark. Frankly, we are shocked with this draw-down, chalking it up to 2018 going down as the year where there was no place to hide. Gold*, Managed Futures**, and Merger Arbitrage*** proved to be good diversifiers in 4q18, up 7.5%, 3.6%, 2.4%, respectively; but not many “W’s” (aka “wins”) for the year in alts or any asset class for that matter.

Put it all together and a balanced investor is looking at negative single-digit percentage losses on the year. Yes, 2018, in particular the fourth quarter, was a brutal one for investors. It was like we were in the Red Zone about to score an exhilarating touchdown, only for a “Pick 6” to happen. (Pick 6 is when the football is intercepted and returned into the opposing end zone.) What we learned is that “L’s” (aka “losses”) or corrections can still happen. Going into this year, many had forgotten that markets actually can and do go down. Further, markets can be volatile, down big one day, and up big the next. So what is one to do now, besides putting the rally caps on?

The answer is: essentially nothing. Be disciplined and stay the course. Or, if your asset allocation mix has fallen far out-of-line of your long-term asset allocation target mix, you should rebalance back to target buying in relatively cheap areas and selling in relatively expensive areas. Or, if you happen to have come into cash recently, by all means put it to work into the stock market. This may not be the absolute bottom, but it sure appears to be a nice entry point after an almost 20% decline from top to bottom for most stock indices. From a valuation standpoint, equities haven’t looked this attractive in years, with valuations both here in the US and around the globe below the 25-year average.

And speaking of football, it’s easy to be a back-seat quarterback and say, “maybe we should’ve done something differently” before this latest correction. But we need to remember that empirical studies show that trying to time the market does NOT work. You have to make not just one good decision, but two: when to get out and when to get back in. By pulling an audible and being out of the market for just a few days, one can miss the best of all days as evidenced by the day after Christmas when the Dow Jones went up over 1000 points. In conclusion, if you can take the emotion out of it and stay fully invested through the ups and downs; at the end of your football career, you give yourself the best chance to make it to the Super Bowl.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

*represented by the iShares Gold Trust

**represented by the Credit Suisse Managed Futures Strategy Fund

***represented by the Vivaldi Merger Arbitrage Fund

Understanding Benchmarks: Why is my Portfolio Trailing the S&P 500 so far in 2018?

Many investors with well-balanced, diversified portfolios might be asking this exact question when they compare their year-to-date (“YTD”) return with that of the S&P 500. To understand the answer to this question is to understand your portfolio composition and your relative performance to a benchmark which may or may not include the S&P 500.

Per Investopedia, “a benchmark is a standard against which the performance of a security or investment manager can be measured. Benchmarks are indexes created to include multiple securities representing some aspect of the total market.” Within each asset class – equities, fixed income, alternatives, cash – you’ll find lots of benchmarks. In fact, the total number of indexes is somewhere in the thousands! That said, “when evaluating the performance of any investment, it’s important to compare it against an appropriate benchmark.” So let’s start by getting familiar with the most popular as well as the most applicable benchmarks out there.

  • Dow Jones Industrial Average: Arguably the most well-known index for domestic stocks, the Dow is composed of 30 of the largest “blue chip” stocks chosen by the editors of the Wall Street Journal. The Dow is not a good benchmark to compare your diversified equity portfolio because 1) 30 companies is a small sample given there are over 3000 publicly listed stocks traded in the US alone. 2) The Dow isn’t well diversified with a heavy influence to industrials and excludes big names like Apple, Amazon, & Berkshire Hathaway. 3) It is price-weighted, meaning a stock with a higher price will have a higher weighting in the index than a stock with a lower price. Change in share price is one thing, but absolute share price shouldn’t dictate measurement. Thus, this index is severely flawed.
  • The S&P 500: Another index for domestic stocks, composed of 500 large-cap companies representing the leading US industries chosen by the S&P Index Committee. It’s certainly not as flawed as the Dow, but it too has its own problems: the biggest being that it is market-cap weighted, meaning that a stock’s weighting in the index is based on its price and its number of shares outstanding. So as a company’s stock price rises and its market-cap grows, this index will buy more of that stock and vice-versa. Thus, the index is essentially forced to buy larger, more expensive companies and sell companies as they get cheaper. This “flaw” is great in times when large cap growth companies are hot: think about FAANG – Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix, Google – these are all stocks that up until recently have soared and essentially the reason why the S&P500 heading into this month was one of the only 10% of 2018 positive areas amongst all of the asset categories Deutsche Bank tracks. (See graph below.) However, the S&P500 won’t show too well when growth is out of favor and investors emphasize value and fundamentals like they did in the 2000s, a decade when the S&P500 had basically zero return.
  • There are many other popular equity benchmarks such as the Russell 2000 (representing small cap stocks), MSCI EAFE (representing international stocks – in particular ones from developed regions of Europe, Australiasia, and the Far East), MSCI EEM (representing stocks of emerging regions), and lots more.
  • All of these above focus on a particular niche within the equity market. Therefore, none of them really make a good benchmark for comparison to your well-balanced, diversified portfolio. It’s like comparing apples to oranges! Which is why we favor the following benchmark for equity comparison purposes: MSCI ACWI (All Country World Index): This index is the one-stop shop for equity benchmarks consisting of around 2500 stocks from 47 countries, a true global proxy. It’s not a perfect benchmark, but it does get you closer to comparing apples to apples.

Next, we look at popular benchmarks within Fixed Income:

  • Barclays Capital US Aggregate Bond Index:  Basically the “S&P500 of bond land” and sometimes referred to as “the Agg”, this bond index represents government, corporate, agency, and mortgage-backed securities. Domestic only. Flaws include being market-cap weighted and that it doesn’t include some extracurricular fixed income categories like floating rate notes or junk bonds.
  • There are others, like the Barclays Capital US Treasury Bond Index & the Barclays Capital US Corporate High Yield Bond Index, that focus on their respective niche, but probably the best bet comparison for most diversified fixed income investors would be the Barclays Capital Global Aggregate Bond Index. This proxy is similar to the “Agg”, but we believe superior given about 60% of its exposure is beyond US borders. Not exactly apples to apples, but it can work.

Lastly, Alternatives:

  • For Alternatives, benchmarks are somewhat of a challenge as there aren’t as many relative to the more traditional asset classes of stocks & bonds because there are so many different flavors and varieties of alternatives. We think one of the most appropriate comparison proxies in alternative land is the Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index. It reflects the combined returns of several alternative strategies such as long/short, event driven, global strategies, merger arbitrage, & managed futures. As such, it can be considered as an appropriate comparison tool when comparing your liquid alternative portion of your portfolio.

Now that you’re more familiar with some of the more popular and applicable benchmarks of each asset class category, you may be asking the question: which one of the above is the best for comparison to my portfolio? The answer is: none of them alone, but rather a few of them combined. In other words, you would want to build a blended proxy consistent with the asset allocation mix of your portfolio. For example, if your portfolio is 50% equities / 30% fixed income / 20% alternatives, then an appropriate blended benchmark might be 50% MSCI AWCI Index / 30% Barclays Capital Global Aggregate Bond Index / 20% Credit Suisse Liquide Alternative Beta index. Now you’re really talking an apples-to-apples comparison!

You now should be equipped on how to measure your portfolio versus an appropriate benchmark. With 90% of assets categories being down for 2018 according to data tracked by Deutsche Bank through mid-November (see graph below), most likely you are sitting at a loss for 2018. 2018 has been a challenging year for all investors. Besides a select group of large cap domestic names (that are big constituents of the S&P500), most investment areas are down. That 90% losing figure is the highest percentage for any calendar year since 1920! Yikes! This also could be the first year in over 25 that both global stocks and bonds finish in negative territory. Wow! It’s a tough year. Not every year is going to be a positive one, but history shows that there are more positive years than negative ones. Stay the course.

Our investment management team here at DWM is made up of CFA charterholders. As such, we believe in prudent portfolio management which adheres to a diversified approach and not one that takes big bets on a few select areas. We know that with this diversified approach, it’s inevitable that we won’t beat each and every benchmark year-in and year-out, but we can be capable of producing more stable and better risk-adjusted returns over a full market cycle. Further, we are confident that our disciplined approach puts the client in a better position to achieve the assumed returns of their financial plans over the long run, thereby putting them in a position to achieve much sought long-term financial success.

Have fun with those comparisons and don’t forget to lose the oranges and double up on the apples!

DWM 3Q18 MARKET COMMENTARY

Get yourself fit! A diversified portfolio is like a well-balanced diet. You need all major asset classes/food groups for proper nutrition. Think of the major asset classes (equities, fixed income, alts) as your protein, carbs, and fats. If you were to load up in one particular area (e.g. carb loading), you might feel better in the short-term, but it could seriously affect your health in the long-term. And it’s the same way with investing: if you “overindulged” in any one particular area for too long; you are bound to get ill at some point. Which is a good segway for this quarter’s market commentary. Yes, US stocks – those in the large cap growth area in particular – ended the third quarter near records, but now is not the time to be one-dimensional.

But, before we dive into a proper nutritional program, let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 3q18:

Equities: Let’s start with the spicy lasagna…the S&P500, the hot index right now, which climbed 7.7% in the quarter and up 10.6% for the calendar year. However, most don’t realize that just three companies (Apple, Amazon, & Microsoft) make up one-quarter of those year-to-date (“YTD”) gains. Besides these outliers, returns in general for equities are more muted as represented by the MSCI AC World Index registering a 3.9% 3q18 & 3.65% YTD return. Emerging Markets* continue to be the cold broccoli, down 1.1% for the quarter and now -7.7% for the year. In other words, even though the headlines – which like to focus on domestic big-cap stocks, like the ones in the S&P500 and Dow – are flashing big numbers; in reality, the disparity amongst equity benchmark returns is huge this year with some areas up sizably and some areas down sizably.

Fixed Income: The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index, was basically unchanged for the quarter and down 1.6% YTD. The Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index fell 0.9% and now down 2.4% YTD. Pretty unappetizing. The shorter duration, i.e. the weighted average of the times until the fixed cash flows within your bond portfolio are received, the better your return. It’s a challenging environment when interest rates go up, but the Fed continues to do so in a gradual and transparent manner. Last week, the Fed raised its benchmark federal-funds rate to a range between 2% and 2.25%. We could see another four rate hikes, one for each Fed quarterly meeting, before they stop/pause for a while.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, increased +0.7% for the quarter and now off only 1.2% for the year. Alts come in many different shapes and forms so we’ll highlight just a few here. Gold** continued to drop, down 4.9% for qtr and now off 8.6% for year. Oil*** continues to rise, up 4.7% 3q18 & 27.5% YTD. MLPs**** jumped 6.4% on the quarter and now +5.0% for 2018. Whereas alts have not been “zesty” as of late, think of them like your morning yogurt: a great source of probiotics, a friendly bacteria that can improve your health when other harmful bacteria emerge.

So after a decent 3q18 for most investors, where do we go from here and what should be part of one’s nutritional program?

Let’s first talk about the economy. It’s been on a buttery roll as of late. The Tax Cut & Jobs Act of 2017 has created a current environment for US companies that has rarely been more scrumptious, as evidenced by earnings per share growth of 27% year-over-year (“YOY”). Unemployment clicked in at last measure at 3.9% and most likely will continue to drop in the near future. With the economy this strong, many may find it surprising to see the lack in wage growth and inflation. Wages are only up 2.8% and core inflation is up only up 2.0% YOY. Wages are staying under control as the Baby Boomers and their higher salaries exit the work field, replaced by lower-salaried Millennials and Gen Z. Part of the lack of inflation growth is because of the internet/technology that gives so much information to the Buyer at the tip of their fingers, keeping a lid on prices. Trade talk/tariffs, have been a big headliner as of late creating a lot of volatility; but that story only seems to be improving with the revised NAFTA taking shape with Mexico and Canada. Some type of agreement with China could be on the near horizon too.

This is all delectable news, but the tax stimulus effect will peak in mid-2019 and companies will have to perform almost perfectly to remain at their current record profit margin levels. With earnings a major component of valuation, any knock to them could affect stock prices. Further, the S&P500 is now trading at a forward PE ratio of 16.8x, which is north of its 16.1x 25-year average. This is not the case in other areas of the world – Europe, Japan, Emerging Markets – where valuations are actually lower than averages. If you haven’t done so already, time to put those on your menu.

It’s not only a good diet you want for your portfolio; you also want to make sure of proper fitness/maintenance, i.e. rebalancing back to established long-term asset allocation mix targets. Time to bank some of those equity gains and reinvest those into the undervalued areas if you haven’t already done so recently. Regular portfolio rebalancing helps reduce downside investment risk and instills discipline so that investors avoid “buying high” and “selling low”, a savory way to keeping you and your portfolio healthy.

In conclusion, we are in interesting times. The economy is peppery-hot, but incapable of keeping this pace. A slowdown is inevitable. The question is two-fold: how big will that slow-down be, and are you prepared for it? Now is the time to revisit your risk tolerance and compare that to how much risk is in your current portfolio. That spicy lasagna, aka the S&P500, has been a delicious meal as of late, but don’t let too much of it ruin your diet. Make sure your portfolio is diversified in a well-balanced manner. Stay healthy and in good shape by working with a wealth manager like DWM who can keep your portfolio as fit as a triathlete.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

*represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index

**represented by the iShares Gold Trust

***represented by the Morningstar Brent Crude Commodity ER USD

****represented by the UBS AG London BRH ETracs Alerian MLP ETF

DWM 2Q18 MARKET COMMENTARY

‘Confusing’. If you look that word up in a dictionary, you’ll see something like “bewildering or perplexing” as its definition. Confusing could be a good way to describe the state of the market. On the one hand, you have a U.S. economy that may have come off one of its strongest quarters in years. On the other hand, there is continued threat of higher interest rates and a tumultuous trade war.

Before looking ahead, let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 2Q18:

Equities: Stocks were mixed in 2q18. Certain pockets did well whereas certain ones did not. For example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average Index was down 0.7% on the quarter and now in the red for the 2018 calendar year (-1.8%). The Dow’s multinational holdings are more prone to trade-related swings, whereas small caps*, up 7.8% for 2q18 & 7.7% YTD (Year-to-date as of 6/30/18), are not. Emerging stocks**, -8.0% 2q18 & -6.7% YTD, did not fare well. This brewing trade war between the U.S. and China, along with rising interest rates and the rising U.S. dollar, are causing many investors to flee from these so-called riskier areas. We think a good general proxy for global equities is represented by the MSCI AC World Index, which was up a modest 0.72% for the quarter, and now about flat (-0.2%) for the year.

Fixed Income: Yields continued to go up, boosted by the same concerns as last quarter: increasing expectations for growth and inflation in the wake of the recent $1.5 trillion tax cut. The Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index, dropped a modest 0.16% for the quarter and now down 1.6% YTD. TheBarclays Global Aggregate Bond Index fell 2.8% (and now down 1.5% YTD) as emerging market bonds suffered for same reasons as mentioned above for emerging market equities.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, registered a +0.4% for 2q18 and now off only 1.3% for the year. Gold*** suffered, -3.5%, however REITs**** and MLPs† had nice quarter returns of 5.8 and 11.5%, respectively.

Like others, you may be thinking something like this right now: “Thank you for providing color on the various assets classes, but I’m still confused. How did a balanced investor fare overall? And where do we go from here?”

Overall, most balanced investors had modest gains for 2q18 and are pretty close to where they were when they started the year.

As for looking forward, we think the area causing the most confusion and uncertainty is the tariff trade war issue. A lot of this is political noise which has weighed down stock prices. What has been, or will be, enacted is quite different than what is being discussed. We are hopeful that the countries can eventually reach a compromise on trade.

In the meantime, the US economy is red hot, with GDP nearing 5.0% and unemployment levels near lows not last seen since 1969. The upcoming earnings season should be exquisite! But all of these positives get analysts worried that the economy may overheat. The Fed’s goal is to raise interest rates enough to keep enough pressure on the brakes of this economy to control inflation, but not too much where it comes to a screeching halt. That being said, inflation is a little bit above the Fed’s target level and as such we would expect to see the Fed continue to raise rates gradually, perhaps for the next 4 -5 quarters. They’ll most likely need to stop at some point as the economy cools when some of the Tax Reform stimulus wears off in the second half of 2019. It’s not an easy job.

“I’m still confused – should we be worried about a recession in the near future?” While we don’t see it happening any time soon, it definitely is an increased possibility, and at some point, will inevitably occur. The goal is to be prepared for it. Don’t let emotions get in the way. Stay diversified and stay invested. Trying to time the market is a losing proposition. A good wealth manager can help you stay disciplined.

The good news is that the next recession will most likely be milder than the last couple for a few reasons including the following:

  • Economies, both here and abroad, are simply more stable than in the past.
  • Valuations are fine today. The forward 12-month PE (Price-to-Equity Ratio) of the S&P500 is right in-line with its 25-yr average of 16.1. International stocks, as represented by the MSCI ACW ex-US Index are even cheaper, trading at a 13.0 forward PE.
  • The Fed certainly does not want another 2008 on its hands. They will continue to be friendly to market participants.

SP GRAPH EDITED

 

Still confused? Hopefully not. But if you are, talk to a wealth manager like DWM. If you look at antonyms for confusion, you will see words like “calm”, “peace”, and “happiness”. That’s what our clients want and what we seek to provide them.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

 

**represented by the Russell 2000 Small Cap Index

**represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index

***represented by the iShares Gold Trust

****represented by the iShares Global REIT

† represented by the UBS AG London BRH ETracs Alerian MLP ETF

DWM 1Q18 Market Commentary


In our last quarterly commentary, we cautioned not to get complacent, overconfident, or “too far out over your skis”. It’s ironic how just three months later, many investors’ emotions are just the opposite: unsure, cautious, and even scared. And rightly so, given the extreme up and downs for the first quarter of 2018. The stock market was in a classic “melt-up” state in January, only to quickly drop into correction territory in early February, then bounce and fall and bounce again from there. Yes, as I mentioned in my February 12th blog, volatility is back and here to stay (at least for the near future)!

Before looking ahead, let’s see how the major asset classes fared in 1Q18:

Equities: The S&P500 had its first quarterly loss since 2015, falling 0.76%. On the other side of the globe, developed countries also suffered, evidenced with the MSCI AC World Index registering a -0.88% return. Emerging markets were a stand-out, up 1.28%*. In a turn of events, smaller caps significantly outperformed larger caps. Much of this has to do with the trade war fears, i.e. many feel that smaller domestic companies will be less affected than some of the bigger domestic companies that rely on imports. Growth continued to outperform value. However, that gap narrowed in the last couple of weeks with some of the biggest cap-weighted tech names getting drubbed, including Facebook because of their user-data controversy and Trump’s monopolistic tweets at Amazon.

Fixed Income: Yields went up, powered by increasing expectations for growth and inflation in the wake of the recent $1.5 trillion tax cut. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose from 2.4% to 2.7%. When bond rates go up, prices go down. So not surprising the total return for the most popular bond proxy, the Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index, showed a 1.46% drop. Fortunately, for those with international exposure, you fared better. The Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index rose 1.37%, helped by a weakening U.S. dollar (-2.59%**) pushing up local currency denominated bonds.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, was down 1.72%. Losers in the alternative arena include: trend-following strategies, like managed futures (-5.08%***), that don’t do well in whipsaw environments like 1Q18, and, MLPs, which were under duress primarily due to a tax decision which we think was overdone. Winners include gold****, which was up +1.76% for its safe haven status, and insurance-linked funds† (+1.60%), which have hardly any correlation to the financial markets.

In conclusion, most balanced investors are seeing quarterly losses, albeit small, for the first time in a while. So where do we go from here?

Inflation concerns were the main culprit to the February sell-off, but there are other concerns weighing upon the market now: fears of a trade war brought on by tariffs, escalated scrutiny of technology giants, new Fed leadership, increasing interest rates, stock valuation levels, and a bull market long in the tooth in its 10th year.

Opposite these worries is an incredibly hot economy right now, supported by the tax cut which should boost corporate earnings to big heights. In fact, FactSet has projected earnings for S&P500 companies to increase 17% in 1Q18 from 1Q17!

And, whereas there has been much dialogue regarding how the S&P500 has been trading at lofty valuations, the recent move of stock prices downward has really been quite healthy! It has put valuations back in-line with historical averages. In fact, the forward 12-month PE (Price-to-Equity Ratio) of the S&P500 at the time of this writing is almost identical to its 25-yr average of 16.1. International stocks, as represented by the MSCI ACW ex-US is even more appealing, trading at a 13.3 forward PE.

We don’t think inflation will get out of hand. Even with unemployment around all-time lows, wage growth is barely moving up. So we doubt that we’ll see inflation tick over 2¼%. That said, we do think the Fed will continue to raise rates. Frankly, they need to take advantage of a good economy to bring rates up closer to “normal” so that they have some fire-power in the event of future slow economic times. But that doesn’t mean they’ll be overly aggressive. The new Fed Head, Jerome Powell, like his predecessor, most likely will be easy on the brakes, keeping focus on how the Fed actions play off within the market.

Put it all-together and it seems like we’re in a tug-of-war of sorts between the positives and the negatives. At DWM, we feel like the positives will outweigh the negatives and are cautiously optimistic for full year 2018 returns in the black, but nothing can be guaranteed. The only couple things one can really count on are:

1.Continued volatility. After an abnormally stable 2017 that saw little whipsaw, 2018’s volatility is more reminiscent to the historical average of the last few decades. Back to “normal”.

2.DWM keeping its clients informed and embracing events as they unfold, keeping portfolios positioned and financial plans updated to weather what’s next.
Here’s looking to what 2Q18 brings us!

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

*represented by the MSCI Emerging Markets Index

**represented by the WSJ Dollar Index

***represented by the Credit Suisse Managed Futures Strategy Fund

****represented by the iShares Gold Trust

†represented by the Pioneer ILS Interval Fund

COMPLACENCY CHECK: MARKETS FINALLY GO DOWN & THE RETURN OF LONG OVERDUE VOLATILITY

 

The last week hasn’t been kind to investors. The S&P500 and Dow officially entered “correction” territory, which signifies a decline of at least 10% from a recent high, after all-time record highs only a couple weeks ago.   What’s going on???

 

The culprit: things were too good!  Recent stronger than expected reports on wages and jobs means growth may be “overheating” and that can lead to inflation and rising interest rates. Rising rates equal higher bond yields, which can make bonds more attractive than stocks, and – VOILA! – now traders don’t want to own stocks, many of which have become quite expensive on a valuation perspective from the nine-year Bull run. Then, in this worst-case scenario, stocks go down and that causes consumer confidence to wane which means Joe Investor won’t want to be another 4G TV. Consumer spending slows, corporate earnings suffer, and recession takes place.

 

Vicious circle, huh? It doesn’t have to be exactly like that. Furthermore, cycles can take a long time to play out – years, not days. In this fast-paced, information at your fingertips society we’re in, we forget that.

Last Friday’s jobs report showed the largest annual increase in wages since 2009. In hindsight, this wasn’t surprising given that 18 states pushed up minimum wages to start 2018. Furthermore, many major corporations, raking it in from the recent tax cuts, have provided one-time Tax Reform-related bonuses to workers. So these government reports, that some traders obsess over, may have been amplified for January and most likely will come down to earth in the ensuing months.

 

It was just a couple of years ago when many were concerned about DEFLATION and hoped of the day when the Fed could raise rates back to “normalcy”. This schizophrenic market is now focused on the fear of INFLATION. The threat of inflation and higher bond yields – evidenced by the Ten-Year Bond reaching four-year highs yesterday at 2.85% – has some worried. But frankly, a 3% or even 4% Ten-Year Bond environment shouldn’t be so concerning. For the last several decades, the 10-Year was higher than that and could be nice “fresh powder” for a Fed when recessionary times come.

 

The “buy the dip” mentality that has been so common place the last few years has not shown up this time around, or at least not until today. Some contend that “buy the dip” investors didn’t have enough time as the quants and hedge funds with big volatility-related bets work through the crash in that subsector.

After a very calm 2017 where we didn’t see any stock markets daily moves of over 2%, we’ve already had a few this year. Volatility is back to “normal” – not 2017 normal, but normal when we are comparing to the last 100 years or so. It was only February of 2016 when we had our last correction, which really isn’t that long ago. But complacency is unfortunately an easy characteristic to exhibit after such a long period of subdued volatility. Hopefully it didn’t lead to overconfidence.

So we’re in a correction…what do we do now?

 

There have been over a dozen market pullbacks of 5% or more since March 2009. This is another one! According to Goldman Sachs Chief Global Equity Strategist Peter Oppenheimer within a January 29 report, “The average bull market ‘correction’ is 13% over four months and takes four months to recover.” Which tells you that generally when the market comes back, it does so relatively quickly, as we’ve already seen today.

 

So, it’s a fool’s game to try to time the market and jump in and out of it. No one has a crystal ball. Furthermore, we know that over time that staying invested is your friend. Studies show that just missing a few days of strong returns (which we could very well get next week or later this month), can drastically impact overall performance.

So avoid any emotional mistakes by staying invested and staying disciplined. Don’t be making any short-term knee-jerk reactions; instead think long-term and focus on the things that can be controlled:

 

§  Create an investment plan to fit your needs and risk tolerance

§  Identify an appropriate asset allocation target mix

§  Structure a well-balanced, diversified portfolio

§  Reduce expenses through low turnover and via passive investments where available

§  Minimize taxes by using asset location, tax loss harvesting, etc.

§  Rebalance on a regular basis, taking advantage of market over-reactions by buying at low points of the market cycle and selling at high points

§  Stay Invested

 

In closing, a pullback / correction like this one is needed to allow the market to recalibrate. It can be a very healthy event because it may signify that the underlying assets’ valuations are getting back in line with fundamentals. So don’t get anxious over this return of long overdue market volatility. We should all get used to this “new normal” and not let our emotions cause us to take irrational actions that could lower our long-term chances of financial success.

 

Don’t hesitate to contact us to further discuss your portfolios and your overall wealth management.

 

[1] Cheng, Evelyn. “The stock market is officially in a correction… here’s what usually happens next.” CNBC, 8 February 2018, https://www.cnbc.com/2018/02/08/the-stock-market-is-officially-in-a-correction–heres-what-usually-happens-next.html. Accessed 12 February 2018.

DWM 2017 YEAR-END MARKET COMMENTARY

Ah, winter…colder temps, snow (even in the Carolinas)…it’s a good time for the annual ski trip. But if there are words for caution when skiing, it’s always: “Don’t get too far out over your skis!” Something for investors to think about as we talk about how the markets fared in 2017 and where they might go in 2018.

Equities: “Fresh powder!” In concerted fashion around the globe, equities rallied in 2017, thanks to strong economic fundamentals and friendly central bankers. Almost like Goldilocks’s time, where the porridge is not too hot nor too cold, so is the pace of this economic expansion: fast enough to support corporate earnings growth, but slow enough to keep the Fed from putting the brakes on too quickly. This led to a magic carpet ride for equity investors, with returns of 5.1% for 4q17 & 18.3% YTD for the average diversified US stock fund* and a 4.1% fourth quarter return and a hearty 26.8% YTD for the average international stock fund*. “Gnarly!” Growth outperformed value, with a handful of tech stocks (Apple, Microsoft, Alphabet, and Facebook) leading the way. But it should be noted that this won’t last forever. In fact, a 2016 study** showed that the average annual price return for growth stocks to be only 12.8% vs 17.0% for value stocks. Another reason to be diversified.

Fixed Income: It was also a positive time for bond investors, as evidenced by the Barclays US Aggregate Bond Index gaining 0.4% in the fourth quarter and 3.5% for the year. The inclusion of global fixed income assets led to better results with the Barclays Global Aggregate Bond Index registering +1.1% for 4Q17 and +7.4% YTD. Yields on the ten-year bond pretty much finished the year where they started, with investors content with the Fed’s pace of raising rates.

Alternatives: The Credit Suisse Liquid Alternative Beta Index, our chosen proxy for alternatives, was up 1.7% for 4q17 and 4.6% YTD. Two of the most well-known alternative exposures, gold and real estate, had solid showings for both the quarter and the full year. Gold***: +1.6% and 12.9%, respectively. Real Estate****: +3.5% and 7.8%, respectively.

2017 proved to be another rewarding year for the balanced investor. But how do the slopes look for 2018? Will it be another plush ride up the mountain again? Gondola, anyone?!?

Indeed the same items – low interest rates, low inflation, accelerating growth, strong earnings – that propelled the global economy in 2017 should remain in 2018. The risk of recession seems nowhere in sight. Furthermore, the Republican tax overhaul is also expected to be a boost, at least in the near-term. But not sure if that represents “eating tomorrow’s lunch”. Moreover, two key drivers of economic growth, productivity gains and labor force expansion, have been on the downtrend. So is now the time to be thinking about the “vertical drop”???

With the bull market in its ninth year, many areas of the stock market at record highs, and volatility near record lows, it can be easy to become not only complacent but overconfident. Now is not the time to get too far out over your skis and take on more than you can chew! At some point, the fresh powder will turn into slush. Don’t be a “hot dog” or a “wipe-out” may just be in your future.

At DWM, we see ourselves as ski instructors, helping our skiers traverse the green, blue, and even black diamond runs by keeping them disciplined to their long-term plan, including the allocation and risk profiles of their portfolios. Rebalancing, the act of selling over-weighted asset classes† and buying underweighted asset classes in a tax-conscious manner, is part of our ongoing process and prudent in times like these. There are few signs of financial excess like ten years ago, but the market can only be predictable in one fashion: that it’s always unpredictable.

In conclusion, may your 2018 be a ‘rad’ one, with fresh powder on the slopes and fireside smiles in the cabin. Don’t hesitate to contact us if you want to talk or ‘shred’ the nearest run.

Brett M. Detterbeck, CFA, CFP®

DETTERBECK WEALTH MANAGEMENT

*according to Thomson Reuters Lipper

**study by Michael Hartnett of Merrill Lynch

***represented by the iShares Gold Trust

****represented by SPDR Dow Jones Global Real Estate

†versus your initial investment target

Time for a financial caddie?

Caddie_Brett.jpg

“Pro Jock.” “Looper.” That’s what I strived to be in my early days of youth. Those that are familiar with the movie Caddyshack may recognize the reference and, yes, one of my first jobs was that as a caddie. And whereas the Caddyshack movie was quite whacky, in real life the lessons learned by growing up as a golf caddie were life lessons and things as a “financial caddie” I still exhibit today.

  1. Preparation / Guidance – a good golf caddie (“GC”) should arrive to the ball before the golfer and remove any surrounding debris and have yardage-to-the-green ready for the golfer. This is quite similar to how a financial caddie (“FC”) prepares his client for the next big shot in their life, by assessing the current investment environment and creating an Investment Policy Statement/target asset allocation mix and chart of course that can help the client navigate “all 18 holes”.
  2. Paying attention – a good GC needs to be paying attention to their golfer’s needs, i.e. is she cold and needs a jacket from the bag?, is her ball dirty and in need of cleaning?, is she familiar with what the next hole does? A good FC is one that is not only paying attention but being proactive with the client’s needs, i.e. running tax projections to make sure there are no surprises come tax time, running estate planning flow reports to make sure that the clients’ estate planning is in-line with their wishes, etc.
  3. Commitment – I remember some caddies that would quit – sometimes physically, sometimes mentally, sometimes both – out there. That’s bad caddying and a lack of commitment and perseverance. Some days will be beautiful, sunny ones but some will be stormy with difficult conditions. Like a good GC, a good FC makes you, the client, the priority and makes sure that our professional attention, focus and best efforts always have you in mind.
  4. Resourcefulness – Every “loop” is different, every golf shot is different, every round is different the same way in the financial world there are always new things being thrown at you. A good GC and FC will embrace change and always look for new possibilities to solve the problem, unravel the puzzle, and complete the task.
  5. Attitude – the good caddies know that they need to show up to the caddie shack early in the morning with a smile and a hard-working, respectful attitude if they want to earn the continual right of “toting the bag”. At DWM, one of our most valued qualities is a conscientious attitude used to apply diligence for the timeliness of project completion and adherence to punctuality in schedules in respect to the clients we gratefully

That being said, I’d like to share a wonderful experience with you. Schwab & Co invited my father/business partner, Les, to play in the Schwab Cup Senior Pro-Am last week. Pros like Bernard Langer, Vijay Singh, Fred Couples, Lee Janzen, and our new favorite, Brandt Jobe were all there. These are golfers my dad grew up watching and idolizing. Les was able to share the course with these guys and, after a 20+ year break, I came out of golf caddie retirement to strap on the bag one last time!

“So, I tell them I’m a pro jock, and who do you think they give me?” No, not the Dalai Lama, but Les Detterbeck, himself. Third generation of the first Lester. The long putter, the grace, not yet bald… striking. So I’m on the first tee with him. I give him the driver. He hauls off and whacks one – big hitter, the Lester – long, into a one foot crevice, a couple miles east of the bottom of the desert, right on the fairway. And do you know what the Lester says? Gunga galunga…gunga…No, actually he says, “give me the 4 wood” and the Lester proceeds to put it onto the green and two putt for a gross par, net birdie to start our Pro-Am team off in the right direction.

Brett-Les.jpg

It was exhilarating day to say the least. We didn’t win the event, but we had a once-in-a-lifetime day, coming just a couple weeks before Les’ 70th birthday. And whereas I doubt I will ever caddie for someone in an official tournament ever again, I know that I will always strive to do my best as a FINANCIAL CADDIE to the wonderful clients we currently serve and future ones.

Of course, this was the first time I had officially caddied in over twenty years. I thought I did a splendid job, my gift to Les for his 70th. Back in the 80’s, I’d be happy to earn $20-$40 for the round to go blow at the local music shop on a few CDs. But this time… there was no money; only total consciousness. So I got that going for me, which is nice.

(*If you haven’t figured by now, Caddyshack is the author’s favorite move of all time. Happy BDay, Les! Gunga Galunga!)