How Much do You Know About Labor Day?

We are all aware that Labor Day signifies the end of a summer filled with backyard BBQs, family and sunshine. It is the one long weekend of the year when families come together to say goodbye to summer, unwind and prepare for the changing seasons ahead. However, many of us don’t take the time to consider the true origin of Labor Day.

The concept of Labor Day dates back all the way to the Industrial Revolution in the U.S. during the late 1800s. The typical work day was 12 hours long, and the typical work week was seven days. Working conditions were far from ideal, and even children as young as four or five years old were commonly seen working in mills and factories to help their struggling families scrape by.

Many workers began organizing protests and strikes across the U.S. Unfortunately, many of these demonstrations turned violent and, in some cases, deadly. In 1894, Eugene V. Debs, with the support of the American Railroad Union, organized a strike and boycott of the Pullman Palace Car Company in Chicago. This strike effectively crippled all railroad traffic in the U.S., leading then President Grover Cleveland to deploy 12,000 troops to the area to dissolve the strike.

The use of military force on behalf of the U.S. government essentially poured gasoline on the already burning fire of discontent with current labor wages and conditions. Several people were killed during the Pullman strike altercation, and although the strike did come to an end, American workers were still unhappy and began to condemn President Cleveland’s aggressive response.

Meanwhile, union workers in New York City had been organizing and going on strike one day of the year in support of the idea of a national Labor Day that had been circulating around the U.S.

Later in 1894, which happened to be an important election year, President Cleveland decided to implement a nationally recognized annual celebration of American workers to appease his critics – and thus Labor Day as we know it was born.

Fast forward to 2017, where we at Detterbeck Wealth Management are fortunate enough to do what we are passionate about everday in a constructive and collaborative environment. We choose to use this year’s Labor Day as an opportunity to reflect on and appreciate how far the U.S. economy and workforce has come since those historic strikes in 1892.

From everyone here at DWM, have a great Labor Day Weekend and enjoy some time with the family!

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