Total Eclipse of the Sun

We all spend a lot of time thinking about our Sun.  In the summer, we want to know if clouds or rain will obscure the Sun’s heat and brilliance and perhaps impact our plan for outdoor activities.  We must think about the Sun’s intensity by protecting our skin and our eyes from the powerful UV rays with sunscreen, protective clothing and eyewear.  Sunrise and sunset mark the ebb and flow in our days with beautiful atmospheric displays.  The Sun, as we all know, keeps us alive on this planet!

On August 21st, our moon will pass between the earth and the Sun, throwing shade across a wide path of the United States that includes Charleston, SC.  Temperatures will drop, the sky will darken and animals will be confused about what to do. The Great American Eclipse of 2017 will begin in the Charleston area with the first phase at 1:17 pm, will hit the peak or “totality “ period at 2:46 pm and will finally end around 4:10 pm.  This is the first total solar eclipse to occur in the US since 1979 and is the biggest astronomical event that America has seen in years.

There are five stages to a solar eclipse and there are some interesting features to look for during each phase, for those of you getting ready to participate.  Here are the 5 phases:

1. Partial eclipse begins (1st contact): The Moon starts becoming visible over the Sun’s disk. The Sun looks as if a bite has been taken from it.

2. Total eclipse begins (2nd contact): The entire disk of the Sun is covered by the Moon. Observers in the path of the Moon’s umbra, or shadow, may be able to see Baily’s beads and the diamond ring effect, just before totality.  Baily’s beads are the outer edges of the Sun’s corona peeking out from behind the moon and the diamond ring effect occurs when one last spot of the Sun shines like a diamond on a ring before being obscured.

3. Totality and maximum eclipse: The Moon completely covers the disk of the Sun. Only the Sun’s corona, or outer ring, is visible. This is the most dramatic stage of a total solar eclipse. At this time, the sky goes dark, temperatures can fall, and birds and animals often go quiet. The midpoint of time of totality is known as the maximum point of the eclipse. Observers in the path of the Moon’s umbra may be able to see Baily’s beads and the diamond ring effect, just after totality ends.

4. Total eclipse ends (3rd contact): The Moon starts moving away, and the Sun reappears.

5. Partial eclipse ends (4th contact): The Moon stops overlapping the Sun’s disk. The eclipse ends at this stage in this location.

Historically, solar eclipses have been significant events and have been recorded dating back to 5,000 BC.  There are writings of mathematical predictions of eclipses from ancient Greece, Babylon and China.  Rulers and leaders often used the predictions of astronomical events to gain power or to offer reassurance to a fearful population.  George Washington was grateful for a heads up about a coming solar eclipse prior to a battle in 1777 so he could alleviate any superstitions that his troops may have.  And scientists have used the opportunity of an eclipse to study the Sun, measure distances and features in the universe and learn about the Earth’s atmosphere.  The discovery of hydrogen can be credited to a solar eclipse and a solar eclipse in 1919 provided observational data for Einstein’s theory of general relativity.  This year, NASA has set up many sites within the path of the eclipse to monitor, measure and capture data to further their knowledge.  There is much to be learned from studying these phenomena.

As we have seen throughout history, the science of astronomy can be used to predict and measure certain events and occurrences with regularity.  Wouldn’t it be nice if there could be more certainty in predicting the ups and downs of the stock market?  One study found that stocks around the world rise on sunnier days!  However, no one can predict the future.  We need to focus on what we can control, including an appropriate asset allocation, diversification and keeping costs low.  That is why actively managed funds underperform the benchmarks and why even the geniuses like Warren Buffet recommend using passive index funds.  At DWM, we think you should stick with your investing plan and not look for the latest fads or trends or even astronomical events to impact your strategy.

We hope that NASA and other scientists learn some spectacular new things from this years’ eclipse.  Here in Charleston, we will be avid, yet passive spectators to the historical occurrence and will use our ISO certified eclipse glasses to watch the once-in-a-lifetime event unfold.   Happy eclipse watching!